College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term 2004 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2004 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Hebrew and Jewish Cultural Studies


This page was created at 6:25 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.

Winter Academic Term 2004 (January 6 - April 30)


HJCS 491. Topics in Hebrew and Jewish Cultural Studies.

Jewish Literature and Culture in English

Section 001 — Politics and Culture in Hebrew Literature: Ethnicity and Gender. Taught in English. Meets with JUDAIC 317.003 and WOMENSTD 483.005.

Instructor(s): Ruth Tsoffar (rtsoffar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This upper-level/graduate seminar approaches gender, sexuality, ethnicity, and class as categories of difference that participate in the wider production of Israeli culture. We will look at fictional works and films, conceptualizing ways in which gender and ethnicity compete, conflicted, and negotiate with the historical and modern Israeli national narrative and the way these recent works shift historical Zionism to a post national, global discussion.

We will closely look at the ways Israeli writers and film-makers address general questions about hegemonic language, discursive space, author legitimacy, ethnic mapping and self-representation, as they challenge and approximate the canon and the general Sabra notion of the homeland.

The reading, in translation, includes works by writers such as Ronit Matalon, Shimon Ballas; the poetry of Miri Ben Simhon, Yona Wallch or Sami Schetrit; music by Zehava Ben, or films by David Ofek and Buzaglo. As an interdisciplinary course on culture, this course's research, methods, and debates draw on economic, historical, and sociopolitical context of Israeli culture.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 491. Topics in Hebrew and Jewish Cultural Studies.

Jewish Literature and Culture in English

Section 002 — From Bible and Midrash to Modern Hebrew Literature. Taught in English. Meets with Judaic 317.001.

Instructor(s): Shachar M Pinsker (spinsker@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See JUDAIC 317.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 543 / ACABS 543. The Bible in Jewish Tradition.

Judaic Cultural Studies

Section 001 — Philo of Alexandria. An advanced knowledge of Greek is required.

Instructor(s): Gabriele Boccaccini (gbocca@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See ACABS 543.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

HJCS 570 / ACABS 570 / JUDAIC 570. Reading the Rabbis.

Jewish Literature and Culture in Hebrew

Section 001 — Meets with JUDAIC 270.001/HJCS 270.001 and HJCS 470/ACABS 470.

Instructor(s): Yaron Eliav (yzeliav@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Second year proficiency in Hebrew (HJCS 202). (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in HJCS 270/JUDAIC 270 or HJCS 470/ACABS 470.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed as a graduate level introduction to rabbinic literature, a multifaceted corpus produced by Jewish scholars (known in English as Rabbis) from 1st to the 7th century CE. It provides the necessary information for contextualizing the rabbinic project historical, social, cultural, and religious backgrounds as well as mapping of the various genres represented in this literature. In addition, it offers a first hand encounter with the texts in their original language as well as introduction to the most important scholarly trends in the field. As such, the course is geared toward advanced students of Judaism who wish to gain basic knowledge of the rabbis and their literary endeavor as well as those interested in any aspect of Graeco-Roman or Byzantine civilization and wish to work with rabbinic material. Students will attend all meetings of "Introduction to Rabbinic Literature" (HJCS 270; JUDAIC 270). In addition, the seminar will meet every two weeks, during which we will engage in an in-depth study of rabbinic sugyot in the original language and discuss modern scholarship and theory on rabbinic literature. Students will also be asked to read four or five scholarly books and write two short papers

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 577 / JUDAIC 467 / RELIGION 471. Seminar: Topics in the Study of Judaism.

General HJCS

Section 001 — Zohar: The Book of Enlightenment.

Instructor(s): Elliot K Ginsburg (elgins@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/hjcs/577/001.nsf

The focus of this course will be the Zohar (the so-called Book of Enlightenment or Splendor) surely the central (and mostly rich evocative) work of Spanish Kabbalah. This voluminous work, written in sonorous neo-Aramaic, betrays an artist's sense of language. Avoiding rigid categorization, the Zohar likes to speak of divinity and other "secrets" in fluid terms of light and water: flashing sparks, deep wells, springs, and flowing rivers. At once a "narrative" recounting the spiritual adventures of wandering heroes and a mystical "midrash' on Torah, the Zohar attained a sort of canonical status from the 15th century onward.

Our study of the Zohar will focus on its historical placement, including its relation to currents in Christian and Islamic mysticism, and in philosophy; and with regard to social concerns of the day. We will also explore the riddle of its authorship (not only who composed it, but how was it "written": amid the so-called "circle of the Zohar"). The core of the seminar will focus on ways of reading/decoding the Zohar. Themes to explore include kabbalistic images of the divine and of the natural world; the recasting of devotional practices and ritual innovation (including Shabbat practices; sacred eating; and Zohar's impact on popular piety); its critique of certain regnant Jewish practices: its view of language and Torah; the rich (and sometimes bizarre) symbolization of masculine and feminine; the struggle with Evil and the Other; and its relationship of Messianism. Our textual study will be informed by contemporary scholarship, including three works on the Zohar (by Daniel Matt and Arthur Green) that will be appearing only this fall! While students may rely on English translation, I will make ongoing references to the neo-Aramaic/Hebrew original, as well.

Pre-requisites: it is strongly recommended that students either have prior background/coursework in Jewish Mysticism or other Jewish textual traditions, or have undertaken significant (university) study in other religious, contemplative or philosophical traditions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 798. Directed Graduate Readings.

Occasional Course

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

HJCS 990. Dissertation Research Precandidate.

Occasional Course

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral candidate not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U."

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

HJCS 995. Dissertation Research.

Occasional Course

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate (Prerequisites enforced at registration). (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U."

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department


Undergraduate Course Listings for HJCS.


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