College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term 2004 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in History


This page was created at 6:24 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.

Winter Academic Term 2004 (January 6 - April 30)


HISTORY 409. Byzantine Empire, 867-1453.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John V Fine Jr

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A survey taking the Byzantine Empire from the accession of the Macedonians till the Empire's fall to the Ottomans. The course focuses on both internal political history and foreign affairs (relations with the West; the great Church split between Rome and Constantinople; relations with Crusaders and with Slavic neighbors — Russians, Bulgarians, and Serbs, relations with the Seljuk and Ottoman Turks). The main texts are: Ostrogorsky's History of the Byzantine State, and Jenkins' Byzantium: The Imperial Centuries; and for the final two centuries, Nichol's The Last Centuries of Byzantium. Flexible requirements: Besides the final examination, various options exist: (1) a short paper and hour exam; (2) a longer paper and no hour exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 432. Medieval and Early Modern Russia.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Valerie Ann Kivelson (vkivelso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Since medieval times, Europeans have brought back tales of exoticism and barbarism from Russia to their homelands, but few have taken the time to understand the nature of Russian society and culture. This course attempts to examine early Russian society in its own terms, while also studying the historiographic tradition and the issues at stake for the various historians of the field. The course spans the history of Russia from the ninth century, when written records begin, to Peter the Great at the beginning of the eighteenth century. Topics include the formation of the Russian state, the conversion to Orthodox Christianity, the invasion of the Mongol horde, the reign of Ivan the Terrible, and the transformation of Muscovy in the seventeenth century.

Early Russian history poses particular intellectual challenges. The history of this period is not only completely unfamiliar to most people today, but is also complicated by the unreliability of the source record. Imagine trying to make sense of American history if the authenticity of the Constitution were uncertain and scholars were divided about whether or not the Civil War actually took place. This is the degree of uncertainty that plagues the history of early Russia and makes its study exceptionally exciting and interesting. Each student has the opportunity to contribute original insights and to participate in clarifying the opaque record by filling in some of the blanks. This course allows students to experience the joys of original interpretation and research in a field where the answers are still unknown.

REQUIREMENTS:

1)Very short weekly papers (approx. 2 paragraphs) responding to questions from the readings.
2)Midterm: in class.
3)7-8 page paper on a primary source
4)Take-Home Final Exam, distributed on Friday April 13, at my office; due Thursday April 19 at my office, by 3:30 p.m. The exam will require approximately 8 pages of writing, typed, double-spaced.
5)Short, in-class or at-home writing assignments may be added as the term progresses.

There are no prerequisites.

TENTATIVE READINGS:
(Books will be available for purchase at Shaman Drum Bookstore on State Street)
1)Bushkovitch, Paul, Peter the Great
2)Halperin, Charles J., Russia and the Golden Horde: The Mongol Impact on Medieval Russian History (Bloomington: University of Indiana Press, 1985).
3) Skrynnikov, Ruslan G., Ivan the Terrible (Gulf Breeze, FL: Academic International Press).
4)Platonov, S. F., The Time of Troubles: A Historical Study of the Internal Crisis and Social Struggle in Sixteenth- and Seventeenth-Century Muscovy, trans. by John T. Alexander (Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1970).
5)Pouncy, Carolyn, The Domostroi: Rules for Russian Households in the Time of Ivan the Terrible (Ithaca: Cornell University Press).
6)Riasanovsky, Nicholas, A History of Russia, (any edition)., Oxford. (expensive text book, but should be available in used copies for more reasonable prices).
7)Zenkovsky, Serge A., Medieval Russia's Epics, Chronicles and Tales, revised and enlarged ed. (NY: Dutton, 1974).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 434. Russia in the 20th Century: War, Revolution, and Reform.

Section 005 — Graduate students only. Meets with HISTORY 434.001.

Instructor(s): William G Rosenberg (wgr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

HISTORY 434 explores the history of revolutionary Russia and the Soviet Union. At the present moment of historical reimagining, when the Soviet past is rapidly being reconstructed to suit various contemporary needs, studying in a careful way the history of what until recently was the world's second great "super power" should provide new perspectives for students interested in the complexities of the present day world. Using novels, memoirs, documents, and other texts, HISTORY 434 will explore the utopian visions as well as the harsh social realities of the developing Soviet system, its culture, politics, economics, and imperial structures as well as the broad historical patterns underlying its collapse. While focusing on the Soviet Union, it will also attempt to link these patterns with the human predicament more generally.

The course is designed for juniors, seniors, and first year graduate students, but should be accessible to sophomores as well. It presumes no prior knowledge or Russian or European history. Undergraduates are required to attend all lectures and discussion sections, complete in a timely way all required reading, prepare two short written projects, and take a midterm and final exam.

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HISTORY 453. Modern Southeast Asian History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001 — 1942-1999.

Instructor(s): Rudolf Mrázek (rdlf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The major themes of this course will be late-colonialism, nationalism, and modernization of Southeast Asia (Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, the Philippines, Siam/Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, and Burma) — a historical conflict between the societies of the region and the global community of "developed" nations. Political, social, and intellectual history will be studied but, first of all, the course wants to be an introduction to a sensitive and well-informed reading of a broadest variety of historical sources. Individual students' interest in particular region will be fully supported.

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HISTORY 455. Classical India and the Coming of Islam 320-1526 A.D.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Thomas R Trautmann (ttraut@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The greater part of this course concerns itself with the history of ancient India in its classical age beginning with the empire of the Guptas, and attempts to analyse the components of Indian civilization in its classical form (kinship, caste, political organization, religious institutions). It then examines the Turkish invasions and the challenges posed by Islamic rule. This is a lecture course, and it presumes no prior study of India on the part of any of its participants (except the professor). Both undergrads and grad students are welcome.

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HISTORY 456. Mughal India.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001 — Meets with ASIAN 455.001.

Instructor(s): Farina Mir

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/history/456/001.nsf

This course will examine the political, social, cultural, and religious history of India during the period of the Mughal Empire (1526-1858). The Mughal Empire was one of the great empires of the early modern world, encompassing the vast majority of the Indian subcontinent at its height and with more wealth and subjects than either of its two great contemporaries, the Ottomans and the Safavids. This course will explore the larger historical and geographical contexts that enabled this political dynasty, originally based in Central Asia and Afghanistan, to emerge as the preeminent power in the Indian subcontinent. It will analyze the nature of Mughal rule, looking specifically at the evolving nature of Mughal state structure, how a majority non-Muslim population was accommodated, the interactions between religious communities, and Mughal contributions to Indian aesthetics in the arenas of architecture, art, and music. The course will trace both Mughal ascendancy and the decentralization of political power in the last century and a half of the Mughal era (1707-1858). We will examine how Mughal power was challenged, the rise of "successor" states across the subcontinent -- analyzing the political, social, and cultural implications of the devolution of power in the eighteenth century, and the eventual assumption of political control by the British crown in 1858. The British assertion of political sovereignty in India was the result of a sustained engagement with Indian society through much of the Mughal period. We will trace the relationship between British trading interests and Indian society in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, a period which saw the transformation of the English East India Company from a trading concern to a political sovereign in India. Lastly, we will explore perceptions of India's Mughal past in contemporary South Asia. These range from discourse on Mughal architecture and history in India's lucrative tourism industry, to representations of Mughal history in popular Indian cinema, to the portrayal of Aurangzeb, the last "great" Mughal emperor (1658-1707), as an icon of religious bigotry.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 457. History of India, 1750-1900.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Barbara Daly Metcalf

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course covers the history of the Indian sub-continent from a period of decentralized regional states in the eighteenth century, of which the British East India Company based in Bengal was one, to the establishment by the mid-nineteenth century of British control over the entire sub-continent. One central theme of the course will be to show that the commonsense notions of continuity, fostered both by colonialism and nationalism, must be replaced with understanding the newness of modern identities and the new meanings infused into old terms ("caste," "Hindu" or "Muslim," even "India" itself). To understand how our cultures are constructed is to give us a critical distance on what otherwise seems part of nature. Topics covered include the nature of pre-British political and social life; the strategies of British conquest; the emergence of a new public life including movements for social and religious reform. Course requirements include attendance at all classes and completion of the assigned reading before class; two short essays (10-12 pp.); a mid-term and a final.

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HISTORY 459. Gender, Medicine, and Culture in U.S. History.

U.S. History

Section 001 — Meets with WOMENSTD 342.002.

Instructor(s): Martin S Pernick (mpernick@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course compares men and women as healers and as patients, and the connections between medical and cultural gender roles in U.S. history, from the colonial era to the present, focusing on the past two centuries. We will examine how changes in gender both affected and reflected changes in medicine and culture, emphasizing connections between changing concepts of health and of gender. The course will be taught primarily in lecture format, though periodic in-class discussion groups will also be held. Reading assignments will range from modern histories to old medical journals, newspaper articles, poetry and films. Although no background in history, gender studies, or medicine is required, prior coursework in at least one such area would be helpful. There will be essay-style midterm and final exams, a seven page book review paper, and bi-weekly short quizzes.

The course is not open to first-year undergraduates. Those who miss the first meeting without advance permission will be dropped from the course; if you are considering whether to register you must be at the first meeting to preserve the option of enrolling.

Course pack from Dollar Bill at Michigan Book and Supply.

Readings:

  • Laurel Ulrich, A Midwife's Tale, (Vintage)
  • Regina Morantz-Sanchez, Sympathy and Science, UNC
  • Judith W. Leavitt, Brought to Bed, Oxford
  • Andrea Tone, Devices and Desires, Hill & Wang (NOTE: SAME TITLE, DIFFERENT BOOK, AS THE NEXT ONE)
  • Margarete Sandelowski, Devices and Desires, UNC
  • Judith W. Leavitt, Typhoid Mary, Beacon Press
  • Nancy Tomes, Gospel of Germs, Harvard
  • Martin Pernick, The Black Stork, Oxford
  • Edward Larson, Sex, Race and Science, Johns Hopkins
  • Allan Brandt, No Magic Bullet, Oxford
  • Elizabeth Lunbeck, Psychiatric Persuasion, Princeton
  • Barron Lerner, Breast Cancer Wars, Oxford

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 461. The American Revolution.

U.S. History

Section 005 — Graduate students only. Meets with HISTORY 461.001.

Instructor(s): David J Hancock (hancockd@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An intensive course on the background to the Revolution, its progress, and the changes it wrought in American life. Emphasis on America's mid-18th-century socioeconomic transformation, Britain's reorganization of her empire in the 1760s and 1770s, colonial opposition, and the emergence of a uniquely American ideology. Subsequent topics include the progress and disclocations of the military conflict, the attempt at confederation, and the culmination of the Revolutionary movement in the iteration and early development of the Constitution and Bill of Rights.

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HISTORY 463. The Origins of the American Civil War, 1830-1860.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): J Mills Thornton III (jmthrntn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course attempts to understand the causes of the American Civil War. It begins with a description of the society of the ante-bellum South; turns next to a portrait of Jacksonian politics and political ideology; then takes up that transmutation of Jacksonian ideals in the 1840's and 1850's through which hostile sectional stereotypes were defined. It culminates with an exploration of the sense in which the intellectual, social, religious, and economic conflicts in America came to be summarized by the slavery question during the period, because of the demands of political competition. There will be a midterm exam, a research paper of ten pages, and a two-hour final examination. Reading will average about 250 pages a week. Enrollment will be limited to forty students, in order to facilitate class discussion.

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HISTORY 467. The United States Since 1945.

U.S. History

Section 011 — Graduate students only. Meets with HISTORY 467.001.

Instructor(s): Matthew D Lassiter (mlassite@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

History 467 provides a topical and thematic approach to post-1945 United States history, including Cold War politics and culture, the fate of liberalism and the rise of conservatism, the power shift to the suburbs and the Sunbelt, social movements of the Left and the Right, the relationship between countercultures and the mass consumer culture, and the era of globalization and its discontents. The main emphasis of the course is the intersection of politics, culture, and society in recent U.S. history. We will engage questions such as: How has the "frontier mythology" shaped postwar America? How did the Cold War reshape political culture and popular culture in the United States? What happened to the power base of organized labor? How have civil rights, feminism, environmentalism, the Christian Right, and other grassroots movements changed American society? Why did the United States lose in Vietnam? Why is the "war" metaphor so popular in American domestic policy? Were the Seventies more important than the Sixties? Are the "culture wars" finally over? How are Latinos and other new immigrant groups changing contemporary politics? Did the ideology of American Exceptionalism advanced by Ronald Reagan and on display in two wars in the Middle East overcome the "Vietnam Syndrome"? Is it accurate to speak of a new "American Empire" in the global arrangements that have replaced the Cold War framework? Did the 1990s really mark the triumph of the "new economy"? Where did your shoes actually come from?
The workload for History 467 resembles the requirements in 300-level history courses, and no prerequisites are necessary to enroll in this course. History 467 is divided into a lecture/discussion format that will include books, films, documentaries, fiction, and short discussion projects. The graded assignments include a take-home midterm assignment, an independent research paper, and an in-class final exam.

The list below contains the books that are likely to be required for purchase, although these are subject to change.
**Tom Engelhardt, The End of Victory Culture: Cold War America and the Disillusioning of a Generation
**Thomas Sugrue, The Origins of the Urban Crisis: Race and Inequality in Postwar Detroit
**William Chafe, Civilities and Civil Rights: Greensboro, North Carolina, and the Black Struggle for Freedom
**Tim O'Brien, The Things They Carried
**Bruce Schulman, The Seventies: The Great Shift in American Culture, Society, and Politics
**Ruth Rosen, The World Split Open: How the Modern Women's Movement Changed America
**Mike Davis, Magical Urbanism: Latinos Reinvent the U.S. City
**Thomas Frank, One Market Under God: Extreme Capitalism, Market Populism, and the End of Economic Democracy

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, 5, Permission of Instructor

HISTORY 468. Topics in U.S. History.

U.S. History

Section 001 — Asians and Blacks in Detroit. Meets with CAAS 358.001 and AMCULT 305.001.

Instructor(s): Scott T Kurashige (kurashig@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be elected up to three times for credit.

Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/amcult/305/001.nsf

In this seminar course, we will analyze urban community history and politics from the perspective of Asian Americans and African Americans in Detroit. Course materials will provide students with knowledge of topics such as racial segregation, urban redevelopment, the 1967 rebellion, the Black Power movement, and the Justice for Vincent Chin movement. We will connect our discussion of history to an analysis of current efforts to revitalize Detroit, comparing and contrasting strategies developed by politicians, corporations and grassroots community activists. This is a community service-learning course. We will apply the knowledge we acquire to the creation of cooperative projects related to the revitalization of Detroit. In turn, much of our learning will come from practical experience working with community-based organizations in Detroit. Students will also have an opportunity to develop community organizing and outreach skills. Important: Following week 2, the majority of class meetings will be held at off-campus locations in Detroit. Transportation assistance will be provided as needed.

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HISTORY 472. Topics in Asian History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001 — Modern Empires in Pacific Asia. Meets with HONORS 493.002.

Instructor(s): Leslie Pincus, Mark Nornes (amnornes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be elected up to three times for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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HISTORY 475(580). The History of American Constitutional Law.

U.S. History

Section 005 — Graduate students only. Meets with HISTORY 475.001.

Instructor(s): J Mills Thornton III (jmthrntn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a survey of the evolution of American constitutional law from 1789 to the present. It will rely primarily upon reading the selections from the opinions of the U.S. Supreme Court to be found in A.T. Mason and D.G. Stephenson, Jr., eds., American Constitutional Law, and Stanley Kutler, ed., The Supreme Court And The Constitution. The goal will be to discover how the different material circumstances and social and political assumptions of each age in American history have been reflected in the Supreme Court's shifting conceptions of the meaning of the Constitution. In this way, we will seek to define how beliefs about the essential character of American republicanism have been altered through time, and in addition, to appreciate the Supreme Court's changing understanding of its own role in the constitutional order. There are no prerequisites for the course, but HISTORY 160-161 or an equivalent understanding of the general structure of American history is assumed. There will be a midterm examination of ninety minutes, a ten-page term paper, and a two-hour final examination.

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HISTORY 476(569) / LHC 412. American Business History.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David L Lewis

Prerequisites: Junior, senior, or graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/lhc/412/001.nsf

This course familiarizes students with the broad sweep of American business history, and touches on global business history as well. Much course content is personalized, that is, focuses on people, rather than institutions or events.

Course pack. No text.

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HISTORY 477. Law, History, and the Dynamics of Social Change.

Section 001 — The Law in Slavery and Freedom: The U.S. and Latin America in Comparative Perspective. [2 credits for Law Students; 3 for others]. Meets with Law 877.001 and INSTHUM 511.002.

Instructor(s): Rebecca J Scott (rjscott@umich.edu) , Martha S. Jones (msjonz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this class we will analyze the ways in which slavery — generally defined in the Americas as the ownership of property in human beings — was codified and regulated in law. By examining judicial records, we will explore the ways in which law upheld and reinforced the power of slave owners. We will then look at the mechanisms through which slaves themselves at times were able to make use of the legal system to advance their own interests and, in some instances, achieve their freedom. Course readings will include evidence from ordinary trials and from famous U.S. appellate cases like Dred Scott v. Sandford, as well as material from French Louisiana and Spanish Cuba. We will conclude by exploring the role of law and judicial processes in upholding and challenging the structures of caste and white supremacy that emerged following upon slave emancipation.

2 credits for Law Students; 3 credits for undergraduate and graduate students

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HISTORY 478. Topics in Latin American History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001 — Latin America, National Period. Meets with HISTORY 348.001.

Instructor(s): Fernando Coronil (coronil@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/history/348/001.nsf

This course examines the history of Latin America from the early nineteenth century until the present. The approach is chronological and thematic. A temporal narrative will be organized around these themes:

  1. state formation, including forms of political rule and the construction of collective identities at local, national, and continental levels;
  2. élite and popular relations, including cases of rebellion, revolution, and state repression; and
  3. forms of capitalist development and transformations in class relations, ideologies of economic development, and center-periphery linkages.

The discussion of individual countries and of specific topics will be intertwined throughout the course. Classes will combine lecture and discussions. Students are required to read the assigned materials BEFORE each class and are encouraged to participate in class discussions. Written work will involve a short essay, a longer paper, a midterm, and a final. Readings will include relevant sections from a textbook, and articles, monographs, novels, short stories, newspapers and films, some of which will be selected in response to class discussion and students' interests.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 478. Topics in Latin American History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 002 — Literature and Social History (Brazil). Meets with LACS 455.002 and CAAS 458.002 and PORTUG 474.004.

Instructor(s): Sidney Chalhoub

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See LACS 455.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HISTORY 481. Topics in European History.

Section 001 — The Caucasus Since the Fall of the Soviet Union.

Instructor(s): Gerard J Libaridian (glibarid@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be elected up to three times for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine militarized conflicts (Nagorno Karabagh, South Ossetia, and Abkhazia) and latent ones (such as Ajaria, and Javakheti) in the South Caucasus as well as diplomatic efforts at conflict resolution in the last decade. The rise of conflicts and nationalism will be studied in view of factors such as ethnicity, religion, class, historical processes, and of state-building in independent Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia in the context of post-Soviet international relations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 491 / ECON 491. The History of the American Economy.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Peter Rousseau

Prerequisites: ECON 101 or 102. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See ECON 491.001.

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HISTORY 492 / AAPTIS 492 / GEOG 492. Shaping the Globe: Geography and Cartography in the Premodern Middle East & Europe.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gottfried Hagen (ghagen@umich.edu), Michael David Bonner

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See AAPTIS 492.001.

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HISTORY 498. Topics in History.

Other History Courses

Section 001 — Steam Engines and Computers, From Industrial Proletarians to Information. Meets with RCSSCI 461.001 and SOC 495.004.

Instructor(s): Thomas Wilfre O'Donnell

Prerequisites: (3). May be elected up to three times for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~twod/steam/

See RCSSCI 461.001.

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HISTORY 498. Topics in History.

Other History Courses

Section 002 — Migration and the 'New Europe'.

Instructor(s): Rita C-K Chin

Prerequisites: (3). May be elected up to three times for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course focuses on the post-1945 period and explores migration as a key motor in producing what has become known as the "New Europe." Europe, in this conception, is characterized by a traffic in bodies, capital, and culture, a form of circulation which has produced an increasingly diverse and multicultural society. The course emphasizes a comparative approach to migration in the "New Europe." We will examine the three main groups of migrants in postwar Europe (postcolonials, guest workers, and asylum seekers) and the legal parameters which have shaped their lives. We will also explore the similarities and differences in migration across three countries — Britain, France, and Germany. In addition to the socio-economic, legal, political, and gendered aspects of migration, the course considers the ways in which this new diversity has radically transformed the cultural landscape of Europe, focusing especially on film and literature. This course will be conducted as a seminar. Course requirements include weekly response papers to the readings, active participation in class discussions, and a final paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 531 / AAPTIS 587. Studies in Pahlavi and Middle Persian.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gernot L Windfuhr (windfuhr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See AAPTIS 587.001.

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HISTORY 546 / AAPTIS 495 / RELIGION 496 / WOMENSTD 471. Gender and Politics in Early Modern Islam.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001 — Taught in English.

Instructor(s): Kathryn Babayan (babayan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Students should preferably have had one course in Islamic Studies. Taught in English. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See AAPTIS 495.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 578 / LACS 400 / CAAS 478. Ethnicity and Culture in Latin America.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001 — Race and Popular Culture in 20th-Century Brazil. Taught in Portuguese. Meets with PORTUG 474.001.

Instructor(s): Paul Johnson

Prerequisites: CAAS 202 recommended. (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See LACS 400.001.

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HISTORY 578 / LACS 400 / CAAS 478. Ethnicity and Culture in Latin America.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 002 — Slavery, Disease and Race: A View from Brazil. Meets with PORTUG 474.002.

Instructor(s): Sidney Chalhoub

Prerequisites: CAAS 202 recommended. (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See LACS 400.002.

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HISTORY 590. History Topics Mini-course.

Section 002 — Manuscript and Writing in Europe. Mini-course meeting Feb 10, 12, 17, 19, March 2, 4, plus a special session to be ARR. [1 credits]. (Drop/Add deadline=February 17).

Instructor(s): Jean M Hebrard

Prerequisites: (1-2). May not be repeated for credit.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Historians rely for their work on manuscript documents. But how do those documents themselves come into being through the practice of writing? To understand the content of documents, we need to explore and reflect upon the process of their production. This course will examine the history of handwriting practices as complex social, cultural and political tools in the era following the Print Revolution, i.e. when new printing solutions for the diffusion and conservation of information were being introduced. It will focus on the contrasts between personal and public writings in order to understand better the social construction of penmanship itself and the linguistic and rhetorical habits of an expending set of social groups who have access to writing. We will first examine the formal and informal training of scribes as well as tools for self-education. Then we will focus on private forms of writing such as account books, diaries, correspondence, cookbooks, etc. and public forms including administrative records, police reports, manuscript handbills, etc., without forgetting cultural forms such as handwritten literature (for instance in poetry notebooks). This course may be particularly useful for undergraduates in History engaged in research in manuscript sources, and for graduate students who seek training in the close reading of texts.

Writing assignments: A weekly short paper on the readings and a final project on a handwritten document chosen by the student. A copy of the draft syllabus may be found at: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/workspaces/jhebrard/001.nsf

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HISTORY 590. History Topics Mini-course.

Section 003 — French Cities in the 19th Century: Politics, Society, and Culture. Mini-course meeting Feb 5, 12, 19, March 4, 18, 25, April 1, 8. [2 CREDITS]. (Drop/Add deadline=February 18).

Instructor(s): Rebecca Rogers

Prerequisites: (1-2). May not be repeated for credit.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This mini-course explores the political, cultural and social realities of French urban life in the nineteenth century. The themes that will be investigated include the changing nature of political protest within cities through the study of revolutionary moments (1830, 1848, 1870-71), the spatial transformations of Paris at mid-century, and the changing nature of urban working-class and middle-class life for both men and women. Specific attention will be paid to social categories and gender in historical analysis, drawing on both primary and secondary readings. No prior knowledge of French history is required. Classes will be organized as a seminar and students will be graded on the basis of class discussion and essay-writing.

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HISTORY 591. Topics in European History.

Section 002 — Ethnic Minorities Central Europe. Meets with HISTORY 391.002.

Instructor(s): Rita C-K Chin

Prerequisites: Upper-class standing. (3). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines the shifting meanings and histories of ethnic minorities in Central Europe over the past 250 years. Its prime focus is the interactions between German-speaking peoples and the numerous ethnic groups within the Habsburg Empire (Hungarians, Czechs, Serbs, Croats, etc.), as well as Jews, Poles, Turks, and Afro-Germans. The course uses two key analytical frameworks for thinking about ethnic minorities in this part of the European continent. The first, Central Europe or Mitteleuropa, complicates our conventional image of Germany as an ethnically homogeneous society. By broadening the geographic scope, the course draws attention to the specificity of the place itself, an area where competing empires (Napoleonic, Habsburg, Ottoman) overlapped and cross-pollinated. We will consider how different empires dealt with ethnic minorities and how minority status often shifted depending on one's territorial location. The second framework for the course is nationalism. We will examine how the construction of nation-states, as well as the drawing and re-drawing of borders, played an important role in determining minority status. The course focuses on specific moments — the 1848 revolutions, the unification of Germany, World War I, the Third Reich, and Reunification — which radically altered the definition of who would be included and excluded as part of the "nation." The format of the course will be a mixture of lecture and discussion. Course requirements include a map quiz, two exams, and a short paper.

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HISTORY 592. Topics in Asian History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001 — Keywords and Concepts Japanese Soc & H.

Instructor(s): Hitomi Tonomura

Prerequisites: Upper-class standing. (3). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3; 2-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This class is for students who can read Japanese newspapers with a dictionary. We will examine select media-based keywords that represent current interests and concerns of the Japanese public. Nihonjin, yubikitasu (ubiquitous), jijitsu-kon, rachi, Ishihara hatsugen,Toron, dokugasu iki, onsen, daunsaijingu (downsizing; shôshika), daigaku kaikaku, furima (free market), sekiyu, shônen, shinteikoku, tsuma makase, Nihon kiki, puchi, and tora are examples of the terms we will discuss.
The couse is open to undergraduate and graduate students. There is no textbook to purchase.
Some background in Japanese history and familiarity with contemporary Japanese society are desirable but not required.
Students will be evaluated on the basis of class attendance and discussion and two five-page and one ten-paper papers written in English.

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HISTORY 593. Topics in U.S. History.

U.S. History

Section 001 — Gender and Sexuality in African American History. [3 credits]. Meets with CAAS 558.004 and WOMENSTD 698.007.

Instructor(s): Michele Mitchell (mmitch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upper-class standing. (3). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Throughout U.S. history, the intersection of race, gender, sexuality, and class has been especially salient for African Americans — for men as well as for women. If gender and sexuality constituted shifting and contested terrain during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, African Americans actively negotiated what it meant to be individuals who were at once social, gendered, and sexual entities. This course will highlight how and why analyzing gender and sexuality is critical to understanding African American history. From slavery to freedom, reform and leisure, community and conflict, the personal and the public, we will discuss major themes, phenomena, demographic shifts, and social movements. Inasmuch as we shall certainly consider interracial interactions, our focus will be upon intraracial dynamics between women and men in organizations, households, work-sites, and public spaces. We will, moreover, consider strategic ways in which African American women and men approached, negotiated, and even politicized the most intimate aspects of their lives. In this seminar, we shall analyze the diverse ways in which historians have written about sexuality, womanhood, and manhood. This course, then, will chart the historiographical development of gender and sexuality as analytical tools. Course readings shall therefore draw upon now-classic statements as well as newer, cutting-edge scholarship. Whereas there are no prerequisites for this course, seminar participants should have some background in either African American history, Women's/Gender Studies, or U.S. history.

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HISTORY 593. Topics in U.S. History.

U.S. History

Section 002 — Black Radicalism in 20th-Century U.S. Meets with CAAS 558.003.

Instructor(s): Ward

Prerequisites: Upper-class standing. (3). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will examine the historical development of black radical thought and political activity through the course of the twentieth century. Our analysis will be centered on the intellectual production of various black radicals. We will examine the ideas, activities, and writings of these thinkers and activists, exploring the ways in which they participated in and contributed to political movements and intellectual currents of the century. Accordingly, we will read the writings of selected black radicals alongside recent historical studies that explore various expressions of black radicalism. Our focus will be on the United States, but we will give some consideration to ideological developments and political movements in other parts of the African diaspora, most notably African independence. Throughout the course we will be guided by these questions: In what ways have black radicals been influenced by, adopted, reworked, or rejected Marxism as theory of revolutionary action? Can we identify an autonomous tradition of black radicalism? If so, what are its determinants? What is its relationship to American radicalism? What is its relationship to other currents of black thought? How did African thinkers and independence movements interact with or influence African American radicalism?

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HISTORY 595 / CAAS 595. Topics in African History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001 — Conflict and Violence in Africa. Meets with History 357.001 and CAAS 358.002.

Instructor(s): Jean-Herve Gilbert Jezequel

Prerequisites: CAAS 200 recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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HISTORY 596. Directed Area Studies.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A faculty-directed independent study.

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HISTORY 611. The Literature of American History.

Section 001 — Topic?

Instructor(s): Penny M Von Eschen (pmve@umich.edu), Mary C Kelley (mckelley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; Juniors or seniors with permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The purpose of this graduate seminar is to introduce first-year graduate students to certain important topics within the monographic literature of American history. It will by no means attempt to be exhaustive, either in terms of chronological or topical coverage. Rather the goal is to concentrate on a few areas that have been and/or now seem of importance within the field and to examine critically a central text helping to define major issues and avenues of research.

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HISTORY 628. Studies in Jewish History.

Section 001 — Antisemitism and the Holocaust: Interpretations and Representations. Meets with HISTORY 641.001.

Instructor(s): Todd M Endelman (endelman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In the sixty years since the end of World War II, historians and social scientists have produced an impressive body of scholarly literature on the place of antisemitism in modern European society and on the character and causes of the Nazi destruction of the Jews. This colloquium aims to introduce graduate students in various disciplines to problems in the interpretation of modern European antisemitism and the Holocaust. The first third of the semester will focus on the following issues: the relationship between pre-modern theologically rooted anti-Judaism and modern racial antisemitism, the alleged uniqueness of antisemitism in Imperial and Weimar Germany, and the place of antisemitism in modern European politics in general and German politics in particular. The second third will be devoted to the historiography of the Holocaust, including debates about the origins of the Final Solution, the participation of various groups within German society in the process of mass murder, Jewish responses to persecution, survival in the camps, and the behavior of the Allied governments and other so-called third parties. In the last third of the academic term, the focus of the class will shift to discussions — among historians, cultural critics, and social scientists — about the representation and memorialization of the Holocaust in the media, high and low literature, the arts, and other forums. One theme that will emerge repeatedly throughout the semester is the question of what values and interests are at stake in a particular interpretation or representation.

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HISTORY 628. Studies in Jewish History.

Section 002 — The Conversion of the Jews. Meets with JUDAIC 591.001.

Instructor(s): Stefanie B Siegmund (siegmund@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This advanced readings course focuses on the efforts of the Church to convert Jews at key moments in history from late antiquity to the nineteenth century and on the responses of Jews to those efforts. We will approach the question of conversion from a variety of perspectives: theology, rabbinic law, church history, social history. The study of the Church's interest in converting Jews will be compared to the efforts of the Catholic Church to convert other groups in Europe and of Europeans to convert non-Europeans to Christianity. Our meetings will be structured around discussion of commonly assigned core texts and presentations by students of additional readings and research.

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HISTORY 631. Greek Studies I.

Section 001 — Aspects of Greek Religion. Meets with HISTORY 701.001.

Instructor(s): Beate D Dignas

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course can be used as a Studies Course (HISTORY 631) or as a Seminar (HISTORY 701) in Ancient History.

We will discuss a wide range of topics relevant to Greek religion in the Classical and Hellenistic periods. These include cults, sanctuaries, sacrifice, priests, festivals, oracles, mysteries. Within these broad themes we will focus on specific questions that have generated lively scholarly debate (e.g. "Were urban and rural sanctuaries fundamentally different?" "Who were the worshippers of Dionysus?" "Were priests magistrates?" "How can we assess the economic role of sanctuaries?" Who sacrifices?" "Did the polis control religion?" "Who promoted Isis in the Greek world?"). During the sessions we will analyze exemplary source material and put it in its wider context. The character of the sources is wide-ranging but there will be an emphasis on inscriptions. (No previous knowledge of Greek epigraphy is required)

The course material is accessible through a variety of interests and proficiencies in Greek. Participants will be asked to summarize assigned readings, to participate in all discussions in class, to give a presentation on a selected topic and to write a term paper based on the oral presentation (10-12 pages). History 631 requries that the presentation and paper discuss a topic by presenting its context and scholarly debate. Both should illustrate an understanding of methodological issues and the character of research. It is required that the presentation and paper discuss source material and develop new questions; the paper should illustrate advanced research skills.
Required books available at Shaman Drum.

Course pack available at Accu-Copy, 518 E. William

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HISTORY 641. Studies in 20th-Century European History.

Section 001 — Antisemitism and the Holocaust: Interpretations and Representations. Meets with HISTORY 628.001.

Instructor(s): Todd M Endelman (endelman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See HISTORY 628.001.

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HISTORY 652. Studies in East European History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Brian A Porter (baporter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course provides an intensive survey of the scholarly literature on the history of northeastern Europe in the 19th and 20th centuries, including roughly the territory now delineated by Poland, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, and Romania. The reading load is heavy -approximately 300-400 pages each week. Assignments include two essays of about 10-15 pages each; no additional research is expected. History 652 is designed primarily for doctoral students who would like to be tested in this field on their prelim exams, but graduate students from other departmetns or programs who want to obtain a thorough grounding in this field are welcome. Although no previous expertise in East European history is required, students should have a general background in modern European history.

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HISTORY 669. Seminar: Studies in Late Imperial China.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lee

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/history/669/001.nsf

This course is a graduate seminar focused on reading and discussion of a range of influential, challenging, or innovative works in late imperial Chinese history, from the late fourteenth century to the early twentieth century. The course readings cover the political, institutional, and social and economical history of late imperial China, centered on specific achievements and concerns of both the Western and Chinese academe. History 669 provides a good framework for students pursuing major or minor fields in Chinese history as well as for students looking for comparisons to their own geographic fields. Assignments include weekly short papers and one longer essay. Chinese fluency is not required.

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HISTORY 674. Studies in Modern Southeast Asia.

Section 001 — Colonial and Postcolonial Indonesia.

Instructor(s): Mrázek

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, Juniors or seniors with permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course has two aims. First, to inform about, and/or to deepen a knowldge of, modern Indonesia and its neighbors, with "modern" vaguely timed as nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Second, the course will use Indonesia and its neighbors as a case for a more general (theoretical?) thinking about culture and scholarship of colonialism, nationalism, and globalism in its many modifications. Classical as well as obscure (and obscured) texts will be read.

Syllabus is tentative and will be adjusted to the specific inclinations, interests, and level of learning of the class.

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HISTORY 678. Studies in the History of Modern South Asia.

Section 001 — Language and Nationalism in Modern South Asia.

Instructor(s): Farina Mir

Prerequisites: HISTORY 457 or 458. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/history/678/001.nsf

This course will examine the formation of modern linguistic identities in South Asia with an emphasis on their role in various forms of nationalism during the colonial period, and movements for regional autonomy in the postcolonial period. It is centrally concerned with understanding the linkages between language and community on the one hand, and language and nationalisms on the other. What is the relationship between language and community identity? Through what processes does language (and literature) become central to the articulation of nationalism? How does language become imbricated in religious nationalisms? Or in movements for regional autonomy in postcolonial states? And how have historians addressed these issues? This seminar will address these questions through the examination of South Asian history and historiography. In particular, we will explore particular moments in South Asian history when linguistic identity became politically charged. The aim of the course is to familiarize students with the ways language operates as a critical site of shared participation in some circumstances, and of conflict in others; and how it becomes a marker for cultural, regional, religious and/or national identities. While the course draws on examples specific to South Asia, the themes treated in the course have broader relevance. Students studying areas other than South Asia are therefore encouraged to participate in the seminar, and may write research papers on their own geographic area of study.

Students will be expected to write weekly one-page informal response papers and a 15-20 page research paper.
Readings will include:
-Benedict Anderson, Imagined Communities
-Partha Chatterjee, The Nation and its Fragments
-Peter van der Veer, Religious Nationalism
-Bernard Cohen, Colonialism and its Forms of Knowledge
-Thomas R. Trautmann, The Aryans and British India
-Sanjib Baruah, India Against Itself: Assam and the Politics of Nationality
-Vasudha Dalmia, The Nationalization of Hindu Traditions

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HISTORY 698. Topics in History.

Section 001 — Family History & Historical Demograph.

Instructor(s): Myron P Gutmann

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/history/698/001.nsf

This course is an introduction to important readings in the closely linked fields of the history of the family and historical demography. The goal is to introduce students to these areas of study, and provide a basis for undertaking their own research in the future. The course will include material on Europe, the Americas, and Asia over the past five hundred years. Among the important topics to be considered are the evolution of family size and structure over time, the explanation for the decline in fertility and mortality since the eighteenth century in the west, the important role played by marriage in determining social and demographic change, and some of the differences in demographic behavior between cultures and different economic regimes. The course will also give a thorough introduction to the sources used for the study of family and population, and to basic techniques of demographic analysis.
No technical background in demography, statistics, or computing is required.
Requirements will include short papers about the readings, participation in the discussions, and as a final assignment a written prospectus for a possible research paper.

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HISTORY 698. Topics in History.

Section 002 — Gender Politics Modernity Program Era.

Instructor(s): Regina Morantz-Sanchez (reginann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will explore the convergence of public and private in the Progressive Era. It will highlight political, social, and cultural changes — especially critiques of capitalism and debates over immigrant acculturation — as a backdrop for rethinking gender, sexuality, citizenship and the family. How did progressive reformers understand the emergence of the modern era and in what ways did the massive influx of European, Asian, and Latin American immigrants, the development of a modern industrial working class, the migration of African American workers out of the south, the economic and social critiques of socialist and labor activists, native and foreign born, the emergence of consumer culture and new forms of commercialized leisure, contribute to and shape the changing understandings of family, sex roles, and individual self-fulfillment that shaped American modernity?

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HISTORY 698. Topics in History.

Section 003 — History of Racial Formations in the Americas. Meets with WOMENSTD 698.002, AMCULT 699.001 and CAAS 558.002.

Instructor(s): Richard Turits (rturits@umich.edu) , Hannah Rosen (hrosen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See AMCULT 699.001.

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HISTORY 698. Topics in History.

Section 004 — Sex, Crime, and Culture. Meets with GERMAN 821.002.

Instructor(s): Scott D Spector (spec@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See GERMAN 821.002.

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HISTORY 698. Topics in History.

Section 005 — Interpretations of African American History. Meets with CAAS 558.003.

Instructor(s): Gaines

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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HISTORY 698. Topics in History.

Section 006 — Rhetorical Theory and Discourses of Social Change. Meets with ENGLISH 678.001 and AMCULT 699.005.

Instructor(s): Alisse Suzanne Portnoy

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See ENGLISH 678.001.

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HISTORY 698. Topics in History.

Section 007 — Premodern Ethnographies. Meets with HISTORY 796.001.

Instructor(s): Diane Hughes (dohughes@umich.edu), Luigi Berto

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See HISTORY 796.001.

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HISTORY 700. Independent Research Seminar.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course allows faculty to offer required seminar work to graduate students on an individual basis during terms when their regular seminars are not scheduled to be offered.

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HISTORY 701. Seminar in Ancient History I.

Section 001 — Aspects of Greek Religion. Meets with HISTORY 631.001.

Instructor(s): Beate D Dignas

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See HISTORY 631.001.

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HISTORY 719. Seminar in Modern European History.

Section 001 — Seminar in 19th and 20th Century Europe.

Instructor(s): Sonya O Rose (sorose@umich.edu) , Damon I Salesa (salesa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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HISTORY 744. Seminar in Russian History.

Section 001 — Topic?

Instructor(s): William G Rosenberg (wgr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This graduate seminar is oriented toward students in the East European area, broadly defined, but others are welcome. Although there is some common introductory work on methodological issues and the nature of "scholarly article", the primary task of seminar participants is a research project in their own area of specialization with a goal toward publication. The seminar typically includes graduate students from several departments. Students are expected to critique each other's work as well as present their own in its different moments of development.

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HISTORY 745. Seminar in Polish and East European History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Brian Porter (baporter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Reading knowledge of one: Polish, Czech, Slovak, Ukrainian, Russian. Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar is designed for doctoral students who would like to carry out a major research project dealing with the history of northeastern Europe (understood to include the territories now delineated by Poland, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, or Romania). The research must be well grounded in primary sources, so a high level of proficiency in one of the region's languages is required. The final paper should be about 8,000 words long (about 30 pages), and should approach the level of quality needed for publication in a scholarly journal. Students will meet regularly to discuss methodological and historiographical concerns, and there will be a very modest common reading list dealing with such issues.

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HISTORY 752. Seminar in Modern Chinese History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lee

Prerequisites: Command of elementary Chinese essential. Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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HISTORY 756. Seminar in Social and Political History of Modern India.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nita Kumar (nitak@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a graduate seminar based around discussion and the writing of a seminar paper. It stresses methodology, and the possibilities of an Indian historiography that is gendered and anthropological. The topics we will cover include:
-The 18th-19th century backdrop: economics, politics, discourse
-The nature of old intelligentsia
-Languages, audiences, other technologies of communication
-The spaces of poetry and prose
-Redifinitions of history
-Constructions of the nation
-Reform, women, and gender
-New professions and lifestyles
-Science, religion, culture
-New communities and identities

Each member of the seminar will make their own reading list. Class discussions will use the following texts:
-Sheldon Pollock, Literary Cultures in History
-Priya Joshi, In Another Country
-Veena Naregal, Language, Politics, Elites and the Public Sphere
-Francesca Orsini, Hindi Public Sphere 1920-1940
-Manu Bhagwan, Sovereign Spheres

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HISTORY 772 / PUBPOL 770. Seminar in American Social History.

Section 001 — History & Domestic Policy Making.

Instructor(s): Maris A Vinovskis (vinovski@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The seminar will focus on how historians have viewed and participated in the policymaking process. Following several more general discussions of history and policymaking, the seminar will analyze how history has been used recently in developing federal policies in education, but efforts will be made to relate those experiences to other areas of policymaking as well.

Each student will write a 25-45 page paper on some aspect of federal, state, or local policymaking from an historical perspective. The topics should reflect the students own interests and can cover a wide variety of different policy subjects (students certainly can select areas other than education policy if they desire to do so).

Books Available for Purchase

  • David L. Featherman and Maris A. Vinovskis, Thinking Social Science and Policy-Making (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2001). [paperback]
  • Diane Ravitch and Maris A. Vinovskis,eds. Learning From the Past: What History Teaches Us About School Reform (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1995). [paperback]

    All assigned materials are on reserve at the Undergraduate Reserve Room and are also available for purchase at the Shaman Drum Bookshop.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

    HISTORY 781 / CAAS 781. Seminar in Black American History.

    Section 001 — Topic?

    Instructor(s): Matthew J Countryman (mcountry@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    History/African-American Studies 781 is a research seminar in African- American History. The purpose of the course is to give students the opportunity to explore the craft of historical research, argumentation, and writing, with a particular emphasis on the challenges of uncovering and interpreting the African-American historical experience. Over the course of the academic term, students will produce a substantial research paper, based on primary research, on a subject of the student's choosing. These individual projects will form the core of the seminar, but the class has been designed to encourage collaboration at all stages of the essay writing process. A prospectus/bibliography will be due in February; a first draft of the paper will be due in early April and a final draft at the end of the month.

    During the first month of the academic term, the class will collaborate on 2-3 research exercises based on a current research project on the Underground Railroad that is being sponsored by the UM's Arts of Citizenship Program and the Washtenaw County African-American Historical Museum. During the first month, the class will also read and discuss a small number of monographic and theoretical essays on African-American history drawn from three essential historical anthologies: Raymond D'Angelo (ed.), The American Civil Rights Movement: Readings and Interpretations; Darlene Clark Hine, et al., (eds.), We Specialize in the Wholly Impossible: A Reader in Black Women's History; Frederick Cooper, et al. (eds.), Beyond Slavery: Explorations of Race, Labor and Citizenship in Postemancipation Societies. Each of these anthologies will be available at Shaman Drum Bookshop.

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    HISTORY 795 / REES 795 / POLSCI 795 / ECON 795 / GEOG 795 / RUSSIAN 795. Research Seminar in Russian and East European Studies.

    Section 001 — Meets with REES 401.001.

    Instructor(s): William G Rosenberg (wgr@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    See REES 795.001.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

    HISTORY 796. Topics in History.

    Section 001 — Medieval and Renaissance Ethnographies. Meets HISTORY 698.007.

    Instructor(s): Diane Owen Hughes (dohughes@umich.edu), Luigi Andrea Berto

    Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This seminar will explore the ways in which premodern Europeans described, distinguished, and assigned meaning to the world and its peoples. It will provide an introduction to the sources, both synthetic analyses such as Pliny, Isidore of Seville, Pierre d'Ailly, and Sebastian Munster as well as descriptions of encounters from European impressions of the East in the medieval period to explorers' accounts of "new" worlds in the sixteenth. Attention will be paid to categories of analysis such as race, gender, nationality, and relighion and to the form and language of premodern ethnographic discourse. A chief purpose of the seminar is to help students develop a research project based on original sources.

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    HISTORY 796. Topics in History.

    Section 002 — Cult&Social US Hist1848-1945. Meets with AMCULT 801.001.

    Instructor(s): Maria E Montoya (mmontoya@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/history/796/002.nsf

    This is a historical methods and research seminar geared toward those students who wish to complete a research seminar paper. Students can work on a topic of their choosing (in consultation with the professor) in any area broadly defined as the United States and its empire. The class will meet four times at the beginning of the semester to discuss research techniques and to focus the students topics for research. The middle portion of the course will be devoted entirely to researching and writing a draft of the paper. The last few weeks of class will be reserved for "workshops" in which the papers will be discussed with great care and depth. Final grade is based on participation in class as well as the final paper.

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    HISTORY 796. Topics in History.

    Section 003 — Advanced Studies in History and Sociology of Education. Meets with EDUC 841.001.

    Instructor(s): Jeffrey Mirel (jmirel@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Intended for advanced graduate students in educational foundations, provides training and experience in the design and implementation of research projects in the history or sociology of education.

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    HISTORY 802. Reading Course.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (1-3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    These courses, carrying one to three credits, are graded on a letter scale and are designed for preparation of a special topic or area not adequately covered by regular courses. Students may take them only with prior permission of a faculty member. A faculty member willing to offer this course for an individual graduate student sets formal requirements and evaluates performance just as in a regular class. Registration for these courses requires an override from the graduate office.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

    HISTORY 804. Reading for the General Examination.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (1-3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    The preliminary examinations ensure that students have acquired the necessary background for teaching and scholarship in history. Field requirements for the prelim encourage a combination of breadth and depth. Normally, students will prepare at least one geographical/temporal field, usually the major field, and at least one distribution field different in area and/or time from the major field. Students will customize another field to the specific needs, in consultation with their advisor and the Director of Graduate Studies. This field can be geographical, temporal, topical, or methodological. Students are also required to offer a cognate field in another discipline or interdisciplinary program on a subject that will enrich their preparation for teaching and research in history. Other programs may be pursued with the approval of the Graduate Committee.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

    HISTORY 807. Historical Theory and Pedagogy.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Rebecca J Scott (rjscott@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course explores the practical application of recent historical theories to the instructional experience. It is designed for those who are serving as Graduate Instructors for the first time, usually in the second year of the doctoral program. The work-load and reading list is customized to the individual needs and interests of each student.

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    HISTORY 825 / CHIN 825 / ANTHRCUL 825 / ECON 825 / POLSCI 825 / SOC 825. Seminar in Chinese History and Society.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites: Either language knowledge (Chinese or Japanese) or HISTORY 351 or POLSCI 355. Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    The essay is a substantial research paper reflecting interdisciplinary training and the ability to use the Western language literature and Chinese language sources. It is normally written in the three-credit interdepartmental research seminars (825 or 802) and registered for under the department most closely aligned with the thesis topic and readers. The essay must be read and approved by two Center for Chinese Studies faculty members from different disciplines, both of whom will grade it. Preliminary work on the Master's Essay could begin in any of the advanced research/writing courses. Students may petition to use two seminar papers that have received grades of "A" as a substitute for the Master's Essay. All such petitions should be submitted to the China Center as formal letters of request and accompanied by complete copies of both of the graded papers. These petitions will be forwarded for review by a committee selected by the CCS Director and consisting of at least two faculty members.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

    HISTORY 898. Dissertation Colloquium Candidacy.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites: Ph.D. candidacy status. Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Participation in the Dissertation Colloquium for doctoral students nearing the job market stage is required, although official enrollment for one credit is optional.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

    HISTORY 900. Preparation for Preliminary Examinations.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites: Normally to be taken only in the term in which a student plans to take his general preliminary examinations. Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (1-6).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This is an ungraded course of one to six credits which students nearing their preliminary examination elect. It may be taken in the term before or during which the student plans to take the examination.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

    HISTORY 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U."

    Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

    HISTORY 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): David W Cohen (dwcohen@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Must have Teaching Assistant award. Graduate standing. (1). May not be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U."

    Credits: (1).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Winter Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this course.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

    HISTORY 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate (Prerequisites enforced at registration). (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U."

    Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department


    Undergraduate Course Listings for HISTORY.


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