College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term 2004 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2004 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in History of Art


This page was created at 6:24 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.

Winter Academic Term 2004 (January 6 - April 30)


HISTART 403 / ENVIRON 403 / NRE 403. History of Human Interaction with the Land.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth A Brabec (ebrabec@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($30) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($30) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See ENVIRON 403.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

HISTART 415 / WOMENSTD 415. Studies in Gender and the Arts.

Section 001 — Women in Early Modern Europe: Artists, Networks, Viewers. HA grid distribution: IV.3.

Instructor(s): Patricia Simons (patsimon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing, and one course in women's studies or history of art. (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course looks at the conditions of production that enabled the emergence of European women as independent artists in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Our primary focus will be on the Netherlands and Italy, but comparative material will be drawn from England, Spain and elsewhere. We will be looking at spaces and modes of production, such as courts, convents, and cities, and the social networks of patronage, marketing, and gift exchange within which women made and viewed art. Our investigations will concentrate on areas in which women artists made notable achievements, such as still life, portraiture, and self-portraiture. The religious sphere was also a major venue for women's cultural production in such areas as theatre, music, visual imagery, and patronage. Other topics to be considered include the engagement of women in other areas of visual culture, e.g., needlework, calligraphy, anatomical wax models.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 464 / FRENCH 453. Interdisciplinary Topics in French Art, Literature, and Culture.

Section 001 — Figuring the Artist in Nineteenth-Century France. Taught in English, but knowledge of French is desirable. HA grid distribution: IV.4. Meets with FRENCH 660.001 and HISTART 771.001.

Instructor(s): Michèle A Hannoosh (hannoosh@umich.edu) , Susan L Siegfried (siegfrie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing. Taught in English. (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/french/453/001.nsf

See FRENCH 453.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 489. Special Topics in Art and Culture.

Section 002 — Black Atlantic Visual Cultures: Time & Vision. HA grid distribution: II.3,4; V.4. [3 credits]. Meets with CAAS 458.010.

Instructor(s): David T Doris (dtdoris@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (1-3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will examine a variety of Black Atlantic visual cultures, both in Africa and in the Diaspora, with a focus on how historical memory and the experience of the passage of time are articulated in objects and performances. What, for example, are the poetics of trying to reclaim historical "African" origins when such a reconstruction is by definition impossible? The idea of allegory will run strongly through the course: the mourning of lost "ancient" wholeness marked also by the enduring hope that fragments of the past can be reassembled to redeem the present. This is not to say, of course, that the people whose lives and works we will discuss here are abjectly "living in the past" — though this very misconception has been rehearsed often in museum exhibitions devoted to the objectifying study of "Other" cultures. Here, we will address the ways in which the realities of a shifting present are addressed, in struggle, in celebration, and always in movement, throughout the African Diaspora. Classes will consist of both lectures and intensive discussion, so it will be useful — though not required — for the student to have at least some familiarity with African Cultural Studies. Evaluations will be based on in-class participation and presentations, as well as on a term project (which may or may not be a written project, depending on circumstances), and weekly written responses to the readings.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 504 / CCS 502 / ANTHRCUL 502. Humanistic Studies of Historical and Contemporary China.

Section 001 — HA grid distribution: III.3,4.

Instructor(s): Qiang Ning (qning@umich.edu), Lydia Liu (lydialiu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. (3). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/ccs/502/001.nsf

See CCS 502.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 3, 5, Permission of Instructor

HISTART 514. Spanish Art: El Greco to Goya.

Section 001 — HA grid distribution: IV.3.

Instructor(s): R Ward Bissell (bissellw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing, and HISTART 102. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Beginning with lectures that formulate a notion of the spiritual bond between apparently dissimilar works of Spanish art, the course passes to in-depth analyses of selected major Spanish painters from the late 16th to the early 19th C. Religious imagery, genre, still life, portraits, mythology, and landscapes by such masters as El Greco, Ribalta, Ribera, Velázquez, Zurbaran, Murillo, and Goya will be featured. Along the way we will confront and attempt to explain extraordinary expressive extremes, from the explosively passionate to the dream-like, from the brutal to the graceful, from the chaste to the decorative, from realism to idealism. The cultural/historical situations, the creative uniqueness, and yet the essential "Spanishness" of each of these artists will be explored. The text (J. Brown, The Golden Age of Painting in Spain, 1998) will be supplemented by readings in a required course pack and in books placed on reserve in the Fine Arts Library. Students will be evaluated on the bases of midterm and final exams of essay type.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 565. Early Modern Architecture in Italy, Austria, and Germany.

Section 001 — HA grid distribution: IV.3. Meets with ARCH 528.001.

Instructor(s): Lydia Soo (lmsoo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/arch/528/001.nsf

The course examines the architecture of the Baroque period, the buildings and cities of the late sixteenth to the mid-eighteenth centuries in Italy, France, England, and Central Europe. They will be discussed in relationship to contemporary theoretical writings, addressing issues of function, structure, and beauty, as well as in relationship to the cultural context of the Baroque period, including philosophical, religious, political, economic, and environmental factors.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

HISTART 581 / AAPTIS 580. Islamic Architecture: Continuity and Innovation.

Section 001 — Safavid Iran (1501 to 1722). HA grid distribution: I.3.

Instructor(s): Sussan Babaie (sbabaie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing, and HISTART 285. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar explores the visual production of an extraordinary period in Iranian history. The Safavid spiritual and political revolution marshaled the reunification of the disparate ethnic and geographic zones of "Iran" for the first time since the advent of Islam and it launched the gradual but decisive Shi'ification of the region. We examine the visual and spatial record of this period in light of the primary sources (both Persian and European) and in conjunction with the rapidly expanding corpus of Safavid scholarship. Problems and issues to consider may include, among others: the city as history, notions of viewing and social communication, the formation of a theory of art, the interface between literary and visual styles and modes of representation, the pictorial representations and ceremonial enactments of a utopian kingdom on earth, the cultural space of race, gender and sexuality, charismatic absolutism and Shi'i notions of kingship as activated through pilgrimage (to palaces as much as to holy shrines), the artistic and urban dimensions of the early modern global competition in trade and diplomacy, etc. Genres as diverse as divination bowls and public squares, manuscript paintings and choreographed banquets will be considered through close examination of objects and texts and through field trips both near and far.

Enrollment is by permission of the instructor and is limited to 12 students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

HISTART 600. Independent Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and approval of graduate advisor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the department faculty.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

HISTART 611 / CAAS 611. Topics in African American Art.

Section 001 — Critical Race Art History. HA grid distribution: IV.4.

Instructor(s): Jacqueline R Francis (jrfranci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: HISTART 478 and Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

African-American art history's origins are rooted in an ambitious, comparative framework, as exemplified by Alain Locke's and James A. Porter's writings, standards upheld in Sharon Patton's survey African-American Art. Locke, Porter, and Patton demonstrate that the numerous meanings of Blackness must be scrutinized, delineated, and explained. In this course, we shall go further: we will consider race, not only as non-white difference, but as a strategy of identification and increasingly, a problem of overdetermination. Against the dangers of privileging, fetishizing, and even concretizing the margins, our class will investigate "race" in varied places. Our objective is to develop a more critical study of races in visual representation. Whiteness, a construction that has been dependent upon Blackness and otherness from its beginnings, is an obvious target. We also shall investigate "Asian-ness" and Orientalism. Although we will make use of theoretical and interdisciplinary texts, we will not forget the object in our discussions. Indeed, "Critical Race Art History" will work best when we can identify specific systems of representation with which artists are explicitly engaged. This trajectory has to be a contextualized examination of appearances, a careful study of style as image-making strategies and of power differentials mediated across specific, constructed communities of artists and patrons. Textbooks to be used:R. Dyer, White; M. Baigell, ed., Complex Identities; J. Weinberg Speaking for Vice; R. Lee, Orientals: Asian Americans in Popular Culture, and TBA. Articles: To be placed on Fine Arts Library Online Reserves.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 613. Museum Research.

Section 001 — Early Arts of Iran: A Museum Exhibition Seminar. Meets seminar Requirement. HA grid distribution: I.1. Meets with HISTART 394.004.

Instructor(s): Margaret C Root (mcroot@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Arranged around a special exhibition of international significance planned to open at the Kelsey Museum in February 2005, this seminar offers a special opportunity to work collaboratively with the curator-in-charge (Prof. Root) and other museum staff in a hands-on learning environment. This seminar meets with a small undergraduate cohort in HISTART 394; with the idea that graduate students in this setting will gain documented experience in supervisory exhibition-planning roles while also pursuing their own intellectual agendas. The exhibition (Signs & Symbols: The Arts of Early Iran and its Neighbors) will present special themes in the study of the early representational arts of ancient Iran (around 4000-3500 BCE). In this age of long-distance trade, emerging state organizations, increasingly assertive religious institutions, and developments in the emergence of writing, signs and symbols were richly message-laden tools of communication. As such, they served not only the realms of increasingly complex administrative activity; they also served to mediate between human agency and the forces of nature, the spirit, and the powers of medicinal magic. An initial set of seminar-style sessions will focus on background readings in English on the subject of the exhibition. Students will develop topics for individual research that will be part of a larger group dialogue on concepts for the exhibition. The research will (1) channel into proposed layouts and information panels for specific display cases and (2) produce essays that may (with student consent) contribute either to the exhibition publication or the children's workbook, as relevant. Topics for investigation may range widely and can include work with highly theoretical discussions of semiotics as applicable to the material, to explorations of meanings of specific symbolic constructions, to technical studies, to archaeological analyses contextualizing the exhibition material in a larger sphere. This course has been approved as a cognate for the Certificate in Museum Studies.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3, 5: Permission of instructor

HISTART 646. Problems in Medieval Art.

Section 001 — Art & Crusade. HA grid distribution: IV.2. Meets with HISTART 394.002..

Instructor(s): Cecily J Hilsdale (cjhilsda@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course provides a survey of the major artistic monuments associated with the European crusading movement. Crusades were not merely directed towards Jerusalem and the Holy Land but also towards pagan and heretical movements along the northern and eastern edges of Europe, in the south against the Moors in Spain, and even internally against heretics in southern Spain and Italy. Such expansionism has recently been characterized as a form of "medieval colonialism" prefiguring later colonial endeavors in the Americas. In response to the question of medieval colonialism, we will examine the underlying ideology of the crusading movement — its origins through conclusion and afterlife — as well as Byzantine and Islamic responses to such European expansion. While focusing primarily on the visual arts associated with the eastern crusades, this course will begin with the first papal call to arms in 1095 and continue through the thirteenth century and beyond. We will explore not only Crusader art narrowly defined as artistic production during the Crusader occupation of the Levant, but also take into consideration responses to the Crusades as well as broader notions of cultural identity and marginality. Students will be evaluated on the basis of two small papers as well as two tests. In addition to weekly readings from primary and secondary sources, the following books will be required: Edward Peters, ed., The First Crusade: The Chronicle of Fulcher of Chartres and Other Source Materials (University of Pennsylvania Press, 1995 [1971]); Jonathan Riley-Smith, ed., The Oxford Illustrated History of the Crusades (Oxford University Press, 1997 [1995]).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

HISTART 652. Theory & Lit Art - Italian.

Section 001 — Art and Popular Religion in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe. HA grid distribution: IV.2,3.

Instructor(s): Megan L Holmes (holmesml@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Recent historiographic developments in the study of religious history have brought increasing attention to the religious practices of non-élites and the material and visual culture of 'the everyday'. In this seminar, we will consider the role of art within popular religion in Europe during the late Medieval and Early Modern period. Both 'art' and 'popular religion,' however, will be interrogated in relation to specific cultural and theoretical discourses-historical and modern. We will be attentive to the association of popular religion in period texts and images with superstition, ignorance, misbehavior, rusticity, and the transgression of orthodox belief (magic, witchcraft, sorcery, heresy, and idolatry). In cultural studies popular religion is a binary term with diverse and contradictory associations: extra-liturgical, traditional, indigenous, subaltern, mass. Art historians have a tendency to conceive of popular religious art from the Late Medieval and Early Modern period in terms of a 'high-low' binary dependent upon a quality criterion rather than socioeconomic, cultural and historical considerations. Popular religious art is thus characterized negatively as evincing little artistry, a lack of articulacy, misinterpretation, cheap manufacture, and the utilization of forms of mechanical reproduction. Furthermore, this quality criterion often leads to the designation as 'popular' objects that were, in fact, historically situated within élite, learned, and dominant cultural spheres.

In the seminar, we will strive for some consensus about how to define and situate 'popular religious art' during this period. We will explore the potential of 'popular religious art' as a critical category that can elucidate the tensions in cultural diversity, dynamic representational strategies, and, in the words of the anthropologist Alfred Gell, "social relations in the vicinity of objects mediating social agency." In opening up the category of 'art' to include a greater variety of visual and material culture, we will study representational objects and imagery that were utilized in religious activities in which a broader spectrum of the population participated (processional images and banners, votives, religious prints, pilgrim tokens, illustrated devotional texts, reliquaries, cult images). We will consider modes of representation that are characterized as 'popular': symbolic inversion and the carnivalesque, didactic simplification, and talismanic and animistic investment. We will be interested in questions of agency and ideology-how individuals and communities shaped, and were shaped by, the visual and material culture of Christianity. Popular religion will be investigated as a site of containment, resistance, and transformation.

This is a graduate seminar for specialists and non-specialists. Readings are assigned weekly and will be discussed in class. Toward the end of the seminar, students will present formal research papers that will be revised for final submission. Students may choose to write their papers on topics related to popular religion and art from other historical periods and cultures, including non-European and non-Christian cultures.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 700. Independent Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Approval of graduate advisor. Graduate standing. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Intended for individualized student non-thesis research under the supervision of History of Art faculty. Must be arranged with the faculty member and approved by the program.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

HISTART 771. Problems in Art of the Nineteenth Century.

Section 001 — Figuring the Artist in Nineteeth-Century France. Taught in English, but knowledge of French is desirable. HA grid distribution: IV.4. Meets with FRENCH 453.001, HISTART 464.001, and FRENCH 660.001.

Instructor(s): Michèle A Hannoosh (hannoosh@umich.edu) , Susan L Siegfried (siegfrie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/french/453/001.nsf

See FRENCH 660.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3, 5, Permission of instructor

HISTART 772. Problems in Modern Art.

Section 001 — Femininities in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Art: Mythologies/Materialism/Orientalisms. HA grid distribution: IV.4. Meets with WOMENSTD 698.003.

Instructor(s): Susan L Siegfried (siegfrie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course studies the imagery of women as powerful imaginary figures in the visual arts of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Europe. An increased feminine presence in the cultural imaginary in the nineteenth century needs to be related to a failure of masculinist culture from within, which saw the demise of classical male heroes who had dominated neo-classical and republican art of the eighteenth century. We will consider the implications of this for women artists, patrons, and critics as well as the possibilities for male artists and writers to identify with and through the female figure in their work. One thematic focus will be the relationship between nude and clothed figures. This will be sited at an intersection of two concurrent developments: the shift from the male to the female nude as the dominant figure of ideal beauty in the visual arts; and "the great masculine renunciation" of aristocratic costume, which prepared the way for an identification of women's fashion with modernity. Other themes include the relationship between the trade in textiles and luxury goods and representations of orientalism; and mythologies of the female figure, both classical and contemporary, in figures of fantasy as well as in portraits. The course works across disciplines. It is designed for people in historical and literary studies who have some familiarity with gender theory and want to expand their work into the visual arts, and equally for people who specialize in the visual arts and want to study the importance of gender in them.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3, 5: Permission of instructor

HISTART 855 / CLARCH 855. Problems in Roman Archaeology.

Section 001 — Roman Cities of Asia Minor. HA grid distribution: IV.1.

Instructor(s): Elaine K Gazda (gazda@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will consider a variety of issues and archaeological (especially architectural and sculptural) remains pertaining to the cities of Asia Minor during the period of Roman rule. The site of Antioch of Pisidia, where the U of M excavated in 1924, will serve both as a focal point and as a point of departure for studying developments throughout the province. Specific topics for discussion will be geared to student interests insofar as possible. The seminar may lead to an exhibition, either at the Kelsey Museum or online. Requirements for the seminar include weekly participation in seminar discussions, a preliminary report (15-20 minutes) within the first six weeks of the term, a final report (50 minutes) in the second half of the term, and a final paper based on the final report due by the end of term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U."

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

HISTART 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate (Prerequisites enforced at registration). (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U."

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department


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