College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term 2004 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2004 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Linguistics


This page was created at 6:21 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.

Winter Academic Term 2004 (January 6 - April 30)


LING 408 / ENGLISH 408. Varieties of English.

Section 001 — Early Middle English Texts. Meets with ENGLISH 503.001.

Instructor(s): Thomas E Toon (ttoon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See ENGLISH 408.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

LING 429. Discourse Analysis and Language Teaching.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John Malcolm Swales (jmswales@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: LING 313, 316, or 315. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What are the connections between language, linguistics, and language teaching materials? In particular, how can the recent advances in discourse analysis and corpus linguistics be built into tasks and exercises? This practical course is designed to give participants training in the processes of collecting authentic language data, analyzing that data, and converting it into appropriate pedagogical formats.

Although the main focus of illustration will be ESL, every effort will be made to accommodate other interests. There will be one or two guest speakers, and use will be made of the Michigan Corpus of Academic Spoken English (MICASE).

The course text is Guy Cook "Discourse Analysis", available at Shaman Drum. Other materials will be on reserve at the Linguistics/ELI Library.

Assessed work will consist of a number of shorter exercises and a final major project (group or individual). Graduate students will also produce a short academic paper.

Toward the end of the academic term, we will round off the course with a mini-conference in the English Language Institute, where the final projects will reappear in either presentation or poster format!

Inquiries to jmswales@umich.edu.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

LING 492. Topics in Linguistics.

Section 004 — Voice of America's Ethnic Minorities: Language Change, Maintenance and Loss.

Instructor(s): Renee L Blake

Prerequisites: (3). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Theme Semester

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How speakers see themselves and how they are seen by others are often linked to the language that they speak and the linguistic choices they make. In the present course, we will consider the interaction of language and ethnicity. We will look at the role of language in the construction of identity, particularly ethnic and racial identity. Further, we will consider in-group and out-group uses of language alike. In particular, we will look at four sets of ethnic minorities in the U.S.: African Americans, Asian Americans, Latinos, and Native Americans.

Language, language attitudes, language use-none of these is neutral. We will examine American language ideology, not only those aspects of it that are widely held among Americans generally, but also facets that differ from group to group and may be contested between groups. We will consider the politics of language in America, including the current school-centered controversies over bilingual education and the acknowledgment of "Ebonics". With regard to formal education, we will look at its role in language socialization, particularly in the language socialization of minority children.

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LING 513. Phonology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Edward R Barrett (rustyb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: LING 313. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Phonology studies the sound system of human languages. This course introduces the fundamental concepts in phonology. Topics include distinctive features, phonological rules, prosodic structure (syllable, stress, tone, intonation), multi-tiered phonology, feature geometry, underspecification, and Optimality Theory. Both theory and problem-solving ability will be emphasized. Besides readings for class, weekly exercises constitute an important part of the course. In addition, there is a final project on a selected topic.

Prerequisite: LING 313 or 512, or permission of the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

LING 514. Semantics and Pragmatics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Peter Ludlow (ludlow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: LING 316. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course introduces four tools for semantic analysis, their relation to current issues in semantic theory, and their relation to an overall picture of what meaning is and how it is encoded in natural language. The four tools are:

  1. (intensional) predicate and propositional logic,
  2. discourse representation theory,
  3. situation theory, and
  4. generalized quantifier theory.

These tools are couched in the truth-functional approach to what meaning is, according to which language is basically classificational — linguistic expressions (words, predicates, sentences) serve to classify reality into what is the case and what isn't the case. With these tools, we will explore current issues in semantics relating to the syntax-semantics interface, quantification, scope and anaphora, information packaging and the various ways in which meaning and context interact.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

LING 520. Lexicon and Lexicography.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey G Heath (jheath@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/ling/520/001.nsf

This course has two parts: (a) the "mental lexicon" of (native) speakers of any language; and (b) the preparation and criticism of dictionaries and similar lexicographic resources. The approach is cross-linguistic (and cross-cultural). Part One begins with consideration of how grammatical systems interact with lexical structure (configurationality, word classes, argument structure, derivational ablaut versus affixation). It then examines interactions between lexical and inflectional information (Aktionsart, motion, alienability) in several languages. It proceeds to consider, in turn, several key lexical subsystems whose structure is variable across languages: color, topography, kinship, emotion, flora-fauna. Relevant evidence from acquisition, aphasic case studies, borrowing, and historical linguistics will conclude this segment. In Part 2, the construction of monolingual and bilingual dictionaries, and of individual lexical entries, will be considered: etymologies, hierarchization of senses, grammatical information, attestations, exemplification, translation, practical and scientific orthography, cross-referencing, and navigation, keeping in mind the range of end-users and their diverse needs. Elicitation techniques for field lexicography will be exemplified. Individual student projects may take the form of a lexicographic study of a particular language (including proposed sample dictionary entries), a cross-linguistic study of a particular lexical domain, a critical study of selected recent or ancient lexicographic works, or a more technical study relevant to the student's speciality. No prerequisite other than a strong interest in languages. Open to qualified undergraduates with instructor's permission.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 547 / PSYCH 547. Experimental Methods in Language Processing Research.

Section 001 — Meets with PSYCH 541.514.

Instructor(s): Julie E Boland (jeboland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/ling/547/001.nsf

See PSYCH 547.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

LING 612. Advanced Phonetics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jose R Benki (benki@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: LING 512. Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an advanced graduate class in acoustic and auditory phonetics, and the application of phonetic results to phonological theory. We will focus on articulatory/acoustic relations and acoustic/perceptual relations. The first of these concerns human vocal tracts as related to the sounds that they make; the second involves the physical characteristics of these sounds as related to their linguistic percept. Techniques for studying speech in these different domains will be covered, including articulatory modeling, LPC analysis, cepstral analysis, speech synthesis, and psychoacoustic modeling. Lab sessions and exercises will familiarize students with these methods in both speech production and perception experiments. In the final part of the course we will critically examine recent efforts to relate the physical realities of speech production and perception to the structure of phonological systems.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

LING 615. Advanced Syntax.

Section 001 — Meets with LING 815.001.

Instructor(s): Acrisio M Pires (pires@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: LING 515; graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/ling/615/001.nsf

This course introduces students to innovations in syntactic theory that have been proposed within the last decade. Students will move beyond the introductory-text level and extend their knowledge of Principles & Parameters approaches to syntax through discussion of the goals of Minimalist Syntax and its hypotheses about design aspects of the human faculty of language. The course will explore in detail how postulated minimalist primitives and operations interact to generate the (complex) structures that are characteristic of natural language sentences. Students will read primary literature critically and work on a research paper. For undergraduates, LING 315 and permission of the instructor are prerequisites. For graduate students, LING 515 or permission of instructor are required.

Note: This course will be taught jointly with Professor Daniel Seely, from Eastern Michigan University, and some of the meetings are expected to take place at EMU.

Coursebooks: Chomsky, N. 1995. The Minimalist Program. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press.

We will use an introductory book to Minimalist Syntax as an extra source.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

LING 702 / EECS 597 / SI 760. Language and Information.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Dragomir Radkov Radev (radev@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: EECS 380 or concurrent election of one of SI 503 or LING 541; and graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://tangra.si.umich.edu/~radev/LNI-winter2004/

Prerequisites:


  1. SI 503 (may be taken concurrently)
    OR EECS 380
    OR EECS 595 (may be taken concurrently)
    OR LING 541 (may be taken concurrently)

    AND

  2. graduate standing
    OR permission of the instructor

Audience: Mostly doctoral students, also master's students and advanced undergraduates.

A survey of techniques used in language studies and information processing. Students will learn how to explore and analyze textual data in the context of Web-based information retrieval systems. At the conclusion of the course, students will be able to work as information designers and analysts.

TENTATIVE SYLLABUS

Each class represents a 75 minute lecture.

  1. The study of Language. Linguistic Fundamentals.
  2. Mathematical and Probabilistic Fundamentals. Descriptive Statistics. Measures of central tendency. The z score. Hypothesis testing.
  3. Information theory. Entropy, joint entropy, conditional entropy. Relative entropy and mutual information. Chain rules. The entropy of English.
  4. Working with corpora. N-grams.
  5. Language models. Noisy channel models. Hidden Markov Models.
  6. Cluster analysis. Clustering of terms according to semantic similarity. Distributional clustering.
  7. Collocations. Syntactic criteria for collocability.
  8. Literary detective work. The statistical analysis of writing style. Decipherment and translation.
  9. Information Retrieval
  10. Text summarization. Single-document summarization. Multi-document summarization. Maximal Marginal Relevance. Cross-document structure theory. Trainable methods.
  11. Information Extraction. Message understanding.
  12. Question Answering. Semantic representation. Predictive annotation.
  13. Word sense disambiguation and lexical acquisition. Supervised disambiguation. Unsupervised disambiguation. Attachment ambiguity. Computational lexicography.
  14. Other topics. Text alignment. Word alignment. Statistical machine translation. Statistical text generation. Discourse segmentation. Text categorization.

ASSIGNMENTS AND GRADES

Assignments (45%)
The assignments will involve analysis of real textual data using both manual and automated techniques.

Project (30%)
Data analysis and/or programming project.

Final (25%)
A mixture of short-answer and essay-type questions

READING LIST

Required books:
Manning and Schuetze. Foundations of Statistical Natural Language Processing. MIT Press. 1999. Oakes. Statistics for Corpus Linguistics. Edinburgh University Press 1998.

Reference readings:
Jurafsky and Martin. Speech and Language Processing. Prentice-Hall 2000.
Cover & Thomas. Elements of Information Theory. John Wiley and Sons 1991.
Baeza-Yates and Ribeiro-Neto. Modern Information Retrieval. Addison-Wesley 1999.

A small number of articles will be assigned to complement the major readings. These articles will be primarily from ACL, AAAI, SIGIR proceedings and/or the following journals: Computational Linguistics, Information Retrieval, Artificial Intelligence.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 792. Topics in Linguistics.

Section 001 — Multilingualism:Societies&Prac. [3 credits]. Meets with ANTHRCUL 458.001/675.001 and LING 492.001.

Instructor(s): Judith T Irvine (jti@umich.edu) , Ann Lesley Milroy (amilroy@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2-3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/anthrcul/458/001.nsf

See ANTHRCUL 675.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

LING 792. Topics in Linguistics.

Section 002 — Intro to HPSG Syntax. [3 credits]. Meets with LING 492.002.

Instructor(s): William H Baxter III (wbaxter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2-3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

LING 792. Topics in Linguistics.

Section 003 — Natural Language Processing System. [3 credits]. Meets with Anthro 458.002 and Ling 492.003.

Instructor(s): Steven P Abney (abney@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2-3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course looks at natural language processing (NLP) systems; the aim is to provide students with an overview of how NLP systems are put together. There will be an emphasis on natural language understanding (NLU), as opposed to generation or machine translation, and we will focus particularly on parsing, which forms the heart of any (reasonably sophisticated) NLU system. The course assumes basic programming abilities, but there are no formal prerequisites.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

LING 792. Topics in Linguistics.

Section 004 — QRP (Qualifying Research Papers) Writing Course. [3 credits].

Instructor(s): Sarah G Thomason (thomason@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2-3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed for second-year graduate students who are working on their Qualifying Research Papers. The course is intended to provide structure to the process of writing the QRP, plus opportunities to present and receive feedback on work-in-progress. Because the QRP is often students' first major research paper, the course will also deal with broader aspects of writing, presenting, and publishing research papers in linguistics. These aspects include:

  1. library/network research;
  2. writing abstracts for conference presentations (How do you select a conference? What do abstract reviewers look for?);
  3. writing a paper for oral/poster presentation (How is an oral paper different from a written paper? What are some strategies for getting your points across clearly?); and
  4. publishing your work (How do you select a journal? What are the steps in the review process? How do you respond to reviewers' and editors' comments?).

If time permits, we will also discuss developing a strong CV (What should your CV look like if you are entering the academic job market?) and grant writing (What funding opportunities are available? When should you start thinking about them?).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of instructor

LING 792. Topics in Linguistics.

Section 005 — Language & Ethnicity: Theory, Critique, and Practice. [3 credits].

Instructor(s): Renee L Blake

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2-3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will explore the relationship between language and ethnicity, particularly the role language plays in the maintenance of ethnic identities and boundaries. We will consider the changing notion and importance of ethnicity in terms of the social sciences and everyday conversations and discourses. We will explore the distinction in terms between race and ethnicity and how they are applied in sociolinguistic research. The focus will be on ethnic group formations that have emerged in the modern world including urban minorities, ethnic groups in plural societies, as well as indigenous and post-colonial minorities.

The goal of this course is to allow students the opportunity to work on their individual research, while honing critical reading argument skills. At the end of the course, we should be able to articulate various theories of and positions on ethnicity and race, and how this relates to the study of language.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5, Permission of instructor

LING 801. Seminar on Graduate Study.

Section 001 — History of the Modern Field of Linguistics: The Last 30 Years. [1 credit].

Instructor(s): Patrice Speeter Beddor (beddor@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1-2). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar has three goals. The first is to introduce students to the history of the modern field of linguistics. In the Fall Term we will focus on readings and discussions that will take us from 19th-century linguistics through the Chomskyan revolution of the 1960s. In the Winter Term we will concentrate on the past 30 years of (mostly American) linguistics. The second goal is to begin to develop an understanding of the diverse approaches to the study of linguistics and an appreciation for the relations among these different approaches. Thus, the course also serves as a forum where students can discuss how the various aspects of their coursework fit together. These two goals converge in helping us to build an integrated view of the discipline. The third goal is to orient first-year students to graduate study in the Department of Linguistics, and at the university, and to consider students' long-term goals relative to the course of study they are embarking on. Throughout the year, many of our discussions will be led by linguistics faculty with expertise in specific topics to be covered.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

LING 815. Seminar: Syntax.

Section 001 — Meets with LING 615.001.

Instructor(s): Acrisio M Pires (pires@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Previous course in syntax. Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/ling/615/001.nsf

See LING 615.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 817(802). Seminar: Historical Linguistics.

Section 001 — Topic?

Instructor(s): William H Baxter III (wbaxter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: LING 517. Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U."

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

LING 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate (Prerequisites enforced at registration). (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U."

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

LING 997. Special Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a graduate-level independent research course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department


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