College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term 2004 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2004 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Political Science


This page was created at 6:20 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.

Winter Academic Term 2004 (January 6 - April 30)


POLSCI 451 / JUDAIC 480. Jewish Identity, Politics, and Culture in the Age of Secularism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Zvi Y Gitelman (zvigitel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: POLSCI 350, JUDAIC 205, or any course in modern Jewish history. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See JUDAIC 480.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

POLSCI 486. Public Opinion, Political Participation, and Pressure Groups.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Vincent L Hutchings (vincenth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One course in political science (Prerequisites enforced at registration). (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 592. Advanced Internship in Political Science.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Two courses in political science at the 400-level or above and concentration in political science; or graduate standing. Permission of supervising instructor and review by the Department's internship advisor. (2-6). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits. No more than four credits of internship may be included as part of a concentration plan in political science.

Credits: (2-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Advanced Internship requires careful, individual planning between senior students in Political Science and individual faculty members who approve the internship and provide instruction. To register for the course, the student must complete the internship form and obtain an override to enter the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor. Student must complete the internship form and obtain an override to enter the course.

POLSCI 603. Modern Political Thought.

Theory

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mika Tapani Lavaque-Manty (mmanty@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/polsci/603/001.nsf

This seminar is a chronological survey of early modern and modern political thought. The seminar will cover Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Kant, Hegel, Mill, Marx and Nietzsche and will include additional contemporary writings as well as secondary literature.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 609. Proseminar in Twentieth Century Political Thought.

Theory

Section 001 — Topic?

Instructor(s): Kalyvas

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 617. Proseminar in Legislative Behavior.

American

Section 001 — Legislative Behavior and Institutions

Instructor(s): Robert van Howeling (rpvh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/polsci/617/001.nsf

This course surveys the literature on congressional politics. Though we will make some references to state legislatures and parliaments in other nations, the focus is almost exclusively on the U.S. Congress and its interactions with other branches of government. We can not cover every topic in this huge literature, but the readings will be quite comprehensive, addressing such topics as committees, legislative development and change, party leadership, elections, and policymaking.

Because the congressional literature is one of the most diverse and well developed in American politics, I have incorporated works from different research traditions including empirical, theoretical, and historical treatments.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 626. Foundations of Institutional Analysis.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jennifer L Bednar (jbednar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jbednar/inst%20syllabus%2004.htm

Institutions — from formal mechanisms like separation of powers to informal ones such as culture — create an incentive environment that affects our political decisions. In this course we will think about the function and design of institutions and their effect on individual and mass behavior. We will consider institutions as information providers, focal points, sanctioning devices, and veto gates. We will study classic problems such as institutional resolutions to collective action problems and the creation of stability through conflict. We then turn to dynamic problems such as institutional evolution, path dependence, and institutions as complex adaptive systems. We will think about institutional interdependence and the consequence of institutional imperfection. Our readings will include the work of Douglass North, Thomas Schelling, Jack Knight, Itai Sened, Bob Axelrod, Kenneth Shepsle, Jim March, Elinor Ostrom, Barry Weingast, George Tsebelis, Jon Elster, Robert Putnam, and James Madison.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 638 / PUBPOL 638. Field Training.

Public Policy

Section 001 — [1 credit].

Instructor(s): Elisabeth Gerber

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-6). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

POLSCI 653 / AAPTIS 653. Proseminar in Middle East Politics.

Comparative

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mark Tessler (tessler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course combines an introduction to the logic of comparative political analysis with a concern for the interaction between systematic social science and area studies as scholarly paradigms. Attention also will be given to the individual as a unit of analysis in comparative social research. These themes will be addressed with reference to developing countries in general and the Arab Middle East in particular. Specific topics to be examined include political development, governance and democratization, and politically-salient considerations pertaining to culture, gender, and religion. The first three-quarters of the seminar will be devoted to reading and discussion, followed by an examination. The remaining weeks will be devoted to the design by each student of an original research project that is theoretical, data-based, and comparative. These projects, which students will design but not be required to carry out, should focus on one or more of the topics covered in class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 659 / CAAS 651. Proseminar in Governments and Politics of Africa.

Comparative

Section 001 — African Politics.

Instructor(s): jennifer Widner (jwidner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/polsci/659/001.nsf

This graduate course provides an introduction to topics in the study of African politics. It is designed for those who already have some background in the study of Africa, either through an extensive exposure at the undergraduate level or through prior election of POLSCI 470 (fall term).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 662. Classical Theories of World Politics.

World

Section 001.

Instructor(s): William Zimmerman (wzim@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar attempts to provide students with a better understanding of current debates in the literature on world politics by placing them in the context of the evolution of international politics theory from traditional political philosophy through the twentieth century classics such as Carr, Wolfers, and Morgenthau to such contemporaries and near-contemporaries as Deutsch, Jervis, Organski, and Schelling.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 668. War in World Politics.

World

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Paul K Huth (phuth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/polsci/668/001.nsf

In this seminar, students will read and critically evaluate the political science literature on the outbreak, conduct, and outcome of interstate wars. The readings will cover the central theoretical debates and approaches in the field and related empirical studies on questions of war initiation, victory and defeat in war, as well as war termination. The primary objectives of the seminar are to identify and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of existing scholarship, to think about how scholarship could be improved in future research efforts, and to prepare students for their prelim in world politics. Course requirements include participation in weekly seminar discussions, a research design paper, and written exams.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 681. Proseminar in Empirical Theory and Method.

Methods

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Arthur Lupia (lupia@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course provides skills sufficient for reading most formal theoretic research in political science. At the outset, we discuss the role of logical reasoning in scientific argument. We then explore the structural and substantive foundations of cooperative and non-cooperative game theory. We conclude by surveying recent applications. Grades are based on a series of problem sets, class presentations, and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 687. Proseminar in Political Psychology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ted Brader (tbrader@umich.edu), Kinder

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/polsci/687/001.nsf

In this seminar, we will examine psychological approaches to the study of politics. Some of the topics include: social identities and group processes; cognition and information processing; persuasion and attitude change; motivation; knowledge structures; emotion; ambivalence; and personality. We will evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of particular theories and methods, and discuss the limitations and possibilities of a psychological perspective on politics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 688. Selected Topics in Political Science.

Section 001 — American Political Development.

Instructor(s): Robert W Mickey (rmickey@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/polsci/688/001.nsf

Recently, scholars interested in contemporary U.S. politics have begun investigating key transformations and patterns in U.S. history. We will evaluate their growing body of research in order to explore the ways that substantively important outcomes in the past shape the present, and, more broadly, to explore the utility of studying politics as a process that occurs over time. Substantively, we will examine key events and processes in the United States since the Civil War, such as: state-building; the politics of industrialization and labor relations; the development of the U.S. welfare state; collective mobilizations around race, ethnicity, and gender; and the urban crisis. Analytically, we will evaluate the concept of 'political development;' review new research about temporality, including ideas of path dependence, timing and sequencing, and critical junctures; and compare sociological and rational-choice theories of institutional origins and change. We will also consider the usefulness of concepts and theories in the field of comparative politics for thinking about U.S. politics more fruitfully. A background in U.S. history is welcome but not required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 688. Selected Topics in Political Science.

Section 002 — Governance: Experts & Advisors.

Instructor(s): Martin W Thunert

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course takes a comparative look at the role of expertise, social science advice and consultancy in the policy-making process of several nations — most of them developed democracies — as well as on the trans-national level. Traditionally, government bureaucracies have been the primary source of public policy initiatives and recommendations, but today the growing challenges to governance — more complex issues, the demands of civil society, and the changing nature of representative government, in particular — have made external sources of policy advice as well as political consultants increasingly important if not essential. This course is both empirical and theoretical in orientation: it offers a comparative empirical cross-national assessment of the role of policy advice from such external sources as individual experts, scholars and intellectuals, blue-ribbon commissions, think tanks, legislative support agencies, research-oriented advocacy groups, political consultants and strategists. Our theoretical investigation focuses on two questions: First, Are some types of democratic political systems more open to external advice than others and what may be the reasons for this? Second, How do modern theories of democracy as well as theories of the policy-making process account for the role of these knowledge-based actors?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 688. Selected Topics in Political Science.

Section 003 — Asian Security Issues.

Instructor(s): Kenneth G Lieberthal

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will examine recent developments and prospects regarding Asian security. The seminar will address the underlying forces that are shaping the overall security environment in Asia, the political frameworks through which security issues are filtered in each of the major countries, and pertinent resulting policy matters. It will take fully into account both American and Asian perspectives on these issues. A portion of the seminar meetings will feature guests who are or were key security players in the region. Students, therefore, will have an opportunity not only to study major security trends and issues but also, on some matters, to discuss these problems with people who hold or have held direct responsibility for dealing with them. The seminar is open to graduate students in LS&A and in the Ford School of Public Policy.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 692. Directed Reading.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor required. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A direct reading on a topic of the student's choice.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

POLSCI 694. Qualitative Research Methods.

Methods

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert W Mickey (rmickey@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/polsci/694/001.nsf

This seminar provides an introduction to the design and implementation of "small-N" research in the social sciences. It examines the limitations of "large-N," variable-oriented research, and then considers the strengths and weaknesses of various small-N research strategies. Topics to be explored include: causation and causal inference; concept formation; case study methods; temporality; and the possibility of integrating case studies, quantitative analysis, and formal models.

Note: this is NOT a course that teaches students how to collect non-numerical data. Rather, the course is designed to provide students with procedures to analyze such data.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 699. Statistical Methods in Political Research II.

Methods

Section 001 — Quantitative Methodology of the Social Sciences.

Instructor(s): Robert J Franzese Jr (franzese@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: POLSCI 599; graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course serves as an introduction to the quantitative methodology of the social sciences. It complements a thorough introduction to linear-regression analysis with a more preliminary introduction to the analysis of non-linear functional relationships (especially those associated with binary dependent variables). The course aims to teach students how to construct, estimate, and interpret empirical models that match their theoretical counterparts and maximize leverage from available data for the empirical evaluation of those theoretical propositions. Topics include the classic linear regression model, extensions thereof, specifications and data issues therein (such as omitted variables, multicollinearity, and multiplicative interactions), criticism of such models, and some introduction to time-series and binary-dependent-variable models. Examples will be drawn from the social sciences with emphasis on political science. Frequent homework exercises will give students experience with the practical application of techniques learned. There will also be a final exam and a paper. The prerequisite is a background in basic mathematics at the level of POLSCI 598 along with some familiarity with elementary statistics (POLSCI 599), or permission of instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 719. Racial Politics in the United States.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Cara Wong (cjwong@umich.edu) , Vincent Hutchings (vincenth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

POLSCI 734 / PUBPOL 732 / EDUC 764. Public Policy in Postsecondary Education.

Public Policy

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Stephen Lowell DesJardins (sdesj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See PUBPOL 732.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 736 / PUBPOL 736. Poverty and Inequality.

American

Section 001 — Meets with DOC 858.001.

Instructor(s): Rebecca M Blank, Kristin S Seefeldt

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course analyzes the conditions and causes of poverty within the United States and the variety of economic, social, and political responses to poverty which have occurred in recent decades. The bewildering number of anti-poverty programs that have been tried in the last 20 years underscores the extent of disagreement about the causes of poverty, the situation of the poor, and the role of the government in encouraging income redistribution and social change. The first part of the course explores the problem of poverty, including a discussion of various causal theories about poverty and the underlying implications of these theories. The second part of the course analyzes specific problems and policy proposals, with particular attention to the most recent round of legislative reforms in anti-poverty programs since the mid-1990s.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

POLSCI 760. Research in World Politics.

World

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James D Morrow (jdmorrow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This research seminar will examine topics in the recent literature in international relations. Two topics to be covered are the links between domestic politics and international relations and the role of norms in international politics. Particular attention will be paid to the use of formal models and statistical methods in the literature and extensions of it. Students will have to write a research paper on a topic of their choosing.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 795 / REES 795 / HISTORY 795 / ECON 795 / GEOG 795 / RUSSIAN 795. Research Seminar in Russian and East European Studies.

Comparative

Section 001 — Meets with REES 401.001.

Instructor(s): William G Rosenberg (wgr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See REES 795.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

POLSCI 825 / HISTORY 825 / ANTHRCUL 825 / CHIN 825 / ECON 825 / SOC 825. Seminar in Chinese History and Society.

Comparative

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Either language knowledge (Chinese or Japanese) or HISTORY 351 or POLSCI 355. Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See HISTORY 825.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

POLSCI 892. Directed Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Directed research on a topic of the student's choice.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

POLSCI 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U."

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

POLSCI 994. Candidacy Seminar.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Daniel Levine (dhldylan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing. (1-3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U."

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A seminar for those working on a dissertation. The seminar is an institutional prospectus/dissertation writing group. Seminar participants circulated and present work-in-progress as well as comment on others' work.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate (Prerequisites enforced at registration). (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U."

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Undergraduate Course Listings for POLSCI.


Page


This page was created at 6:20 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.


lsa logo

University of Michigan | College of LS&A | Student Academic Affairs | LS&A Bulletin Index | Department Homepage

This page maintained by LS&A Advising Technology (webmaster_saa@umich.edu), G255-E Angell Hall

Copyright © 2004 The Regents of the University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA +1 734 764-1817

Trademarks of the University of Michigan may not be electronically or otherwise altered or separated from this document or used for any non-University purpose.