College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term 2004 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2004 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Psychology


This page was created at 6:25 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.

Winter Academic Term 2004 (January 6 - April 30)


PSYCH 411 / WOMENSTD 419. Gender and Group Process in a Multicultural Context.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jane A Hassinger, Julieanne Mae Muir

Prerequisites: One course in women's studies or psychology. WOMENSTD 240 is recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See WOMENSTD 419.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 418 / RELIGION 448. Psychology and Spiritual Development.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard D Mann (rdmann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores the stages of spiritual development, beginning with awakening and initiation, through the deepening of direct experience and the formulation of a coherent spiritual path, including the notion of an ultimate attainment. It explores the function of spiritual groups and teachers in facilitating this development. Of particular interest are: the spiritual seeker's experience of 'little death,' the mode of apparent discontinuity when the 'old life' is supplanted by a new identity and mode of living; times of crisis, adaptation, and 'the dark night'; and the experience of 'physical death,' as seen from the perspective of a lifetime of encountering both relative and absolute reality.

By means of personal narratives and fictional accounts, this course explores how diverse traditions create and value these moments of surrender and transformation. Lectures and readings by Hesse, Thich Nhat Hanh, Wilber, Batchellor, and others will form the basis of one short paper and one long final paper. There will be no final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 422(505). Faculty Directed Advanced Research for Psychology as a Natural Science.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and Committee on Undergraduate Studies, and one of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290. STATS 350 and one methods-based laboratory are recommended. This course is generally elected after a student has completed PSYCH 322. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. A combined total of six credits of PSYCH 420, 421, 422, and 423 may be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake research of their own design under the direction of a member of the faculty. The course requires a final 15-20 page paper, a copy of which must be given to the undergraduate office. Students are provided with the proper section number by the Psychology undergraduate office after his/her petition has been approved. Students are responsible for properly registering for the course. Note: This course is generally elected after a student has completed PSYCH 322.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

PSYCH 433. Biopsychology of Motivation.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Susana Pecina (pesu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: PSYCH 230. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will cover the biopsychology and brain mechanisms of affective and motivational processes in animals and humans. We will examine general motivational processes such as theories of motivation, the interaction of motivation with learning, and substrates of pleasure and reward versus pain and stress. We will also look at specific motivational systems such as hunger, sleep, sex, aggression, drug addiction, and their underlying brain circuitry. Students are expected to have taken a course in introductory biopsychology (e.g., through PSYCH 230) or equivalent. Course grade will be determined on the basis of essay exams, papers, class presentation and discussion. The course will be taught as a mixture of instructor lecture, student-moderated topic presentations, lecture, and discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 442. Perception, Science, and Reality.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert G Pachella (pachella@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Introductory psychology. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/442/001.nsf

The course focuses on basic perceptual phenomena and theories. It also examines the general relationship between perception and scientific observation. Topics include: sensory transduction and psychophysics; Gestalt organization; constancy and contrast effects; expectation; selective attention; perceptual learning; and symbolic representation.

While this course is oriented toward the natural sciences, it also considers social, philosophical, and aesthetic perspectives, since at its most general level, human perception concerns the questions of how and why human beings use sensory information to conceive of, and experience immediate reality the way they do.

The instructor assumes no particular psychology background, and non-psychology concentrators are welcome. Grades will be determined on the basis of two short papers (worth a total of 35% of the grade) and one longer paper (worth 50% of the grade). In addition, there will be a short final test that will count 15% of the grade.

Questions concerning this course can be e-mailed to pachella@umich.edu.

Reading: Neisser, U. "The processes of vision." Scientific American, September, 1968.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1, 5 Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 458(558). Psychology of Adolescence.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kai Cortina (schnabel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: PSYCH 250. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/458/001.nsf

This course will provide an overview of adolescent development. We will cover many psychological and social aspects including biological and cognitive development. Family, peer, and school influences are analyzed partly based on original research literature and several popular movies that highlight normative and problematic psychosocial development.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 464. Group Behavior in Organizations.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Karen Epstein (kepstein@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: PSYCH 260. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/464/001.nsf

The course will cover state-of-the-art theory and research on the nature of group behavior in organized work settings, and fundamental factors that lead to group effectiveness. We will examine both contextual factors (for example, organizational resources, the design of the task, rewards) and factors within the group (for example, feelings of safety among group members). In addition, we will evaluate organizations' use of groups and teams through cases. My goals for the course are to enable every student to: understand and explain fundamental factors that lead to or hinder group effectiveness gain first-hand experience in team work by participating in a term-long learning team, reflect on the challenges and benefits of group work, and demonstrate skills for increasing group effectiveness become a more informed evaluator of organizations use of teams as a current or potential employee, manager, and owner. We will work together to accomplish these objectives by the end of the course. Class sessions will be part lecture, part activities, and part discussion of readings assigned for that week.

Pre-requisite: Students are expected to have completed a course covering fundamental topics of organizational behavior, such as PSYCH 260.

Evaluation: Students are evaluated with two in-class exams, a term group project with peer evaluations, and participation in class discussion and activities.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 473(573). Developmental Disturbances of Childhood.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Albert C Cain (cainac@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: PSYCH 250 and 270. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course focuses on children's developmental disturbances. It includes basic points of view, selected syndromes, relevant research data, and etiological concepts. It suggests fruitful ways of analyzing and conceptualizing issues and data in the field, also alerting students to gaps in our knowledge. In addition, the instructor hopes to interest some students in this field in itself, and to encourage others to incorporate certain knowledge, and ways of approaching issues into their own fields. Student work is evaluated on the basis of exams, as well as written exercises and/or papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 5: Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 498 / WOMENSTD 498. Gender and the Individual.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ramaswami Mahalingam (ramawasi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: PSYCH 111. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/498/001.nsf

Examines how gender shapes and is shaped by individual women and men. We draw on psychological theories, feminist theories, and the empirical research literature to examine how gender operates for women and men. The course considers ways in which gender is constructed socially; examines particular domains in which gender is experienced and performed; and examines sources of gender in biology, lifespan development, and socialization.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 532 / BIOLOGY 541 / PHYSIOL 541 / ANAT 541. Mammalian Reproductive Endocrinology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Theresa M Lee (terrilee@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: BIOLOGY 310 or 311, or BIOLCHEM 415. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/532/001.nsf

See PHYSIOL 541.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 541. Advanced Topics in Cognition and Perception.

Section 514 — Experimental Methods in Language Processing Research. Meets with PSYCH 547.001.

Instructor(s): Julie E Boland (jeboland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: PSYCH 240. (3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/ling/547/001.nsf

See PSYCH 547.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 547 / LING 547. Experimental Methods in Language Processing Research.

Section 001 — Meets with PSYCH 541.514.

Instructor(s): Julie E Boland (jeboland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/ling/547/001.nsf

What experimental methods are used to investigate language processing? How do you formulate a research question into a testable hypothesis? How do you evaluate your own results and those of others? This course is intended for students interested in experimental research, but lacking background in research design and statistics. Such students may be from linguistics, computer science, or the school of information. We will examine several experimental techniques used to study language comprehension to illustrate principles of research design, statistical analysis, and paradigm choice. No exams, one paper, plus lab assignments.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

600. Psychology Graduate Proseminar I.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing in Psychology or approved joint program. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U."

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 614. Advanced Statistical Methods, II.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard D Gonzalez (gonzo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: PSYCH 613 and Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/614/

This course is a continuation of PSYCH 613. Topics covered in this course include multidimensional scaling, cluster analysis, principal components, factor analysis, multivariate analysis of variance, and canonical correlation. A brief introduction to reliability theory, structural equations modeling, and hierarchical linear modeling will also be provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

PSYCH 619. Supervised Research I.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Known as the "First Year 619 Research Project." This is an individual instruction course; when enrolling for PSYCH 619, students must use the individual section number of a staff member.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

PSYCH 642 / EIHLTH 639. Obesity and Eating Disorders.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mary A Nirdlinger

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Metabolic, physiological, and psychological determinants of diet choice and dietary behavior. Disorders in regulation of food intake and different intervention strategies will be discussed. Course integrates readings from experimental literature of both psychology and medicine and provides opportunity to develop and analyze intervention strategies.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 644 / EECS 644. Computational Modeling of Cognition.

Section 001 — [3 credits].

Instructor(s): Richard L Lewis (rickl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (2-4). May not be repeated for credit. CAEN lab access fee required for non-Engineering students.

Credits: (2-4).

Lab Fee: CAEN lab access fee required for non-Engineering students.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/644/001.nsf

This course will review computational models of human cognitive processes with four goals in mind:

  1. to learn about the wide variety of approaches to cognitive modeling (e.g., self-organizing nets, multi-layer nets and back-propagation, production systems, ACT*, EPIC, Soar...) and the advantages and disadvantages of each,
  2. to study some of the most important cognitive models of specific domains (e.g., dual task performance, reasoning, explicit learning, working memory...),
  3. to evaluate when cognitive modeling is an appropriate and useful research strategy, and
  4. to give students an opportunity to gain hands-on experience in working with computational models.

Students will be expected to take turns in leading discussion of specific papers and to complete a few highly constrained modeling assignments.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 655 / WOMENSTD 655. The Psychology of Women.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lilia M Cortina (lilia@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will address key themes in contemporary scholarship on the psychology of women and gender. Samples topics will include: social roles, stereotyping, and discrimination; women's development across the lifespan; women in relationships and families; women's mental health; gender and work; and violence against women. Throughout, we will examine epistemological and methodological issues as they affect the study of these and other psychological phenomena, and we will consider how gender intersects with race, class, sexuality, and other social dimensions. To some extent, course content will parallel that in the related undergraduate courses (PSYCH/WOMENSTD 499: Psychology of Women; PSYCH/WOMENSTD 498: Gender and the Individual), to prepare future GSIs for these courses.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

PSYCH 674. Clinical Assessment II.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Laura P Kohn-Wood (lpkohn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is the second of a two-semester sequence, with an associated lab (PSYCH 677). Its central focus is the assessment of psychopathology in children and adults. It addresses issues in the structure and use of major clinical instruments, of clinical inference, patterns of cognitive, affective and interpersonal disturbance, conceptual formulations bearing on the psychological development and disturbance, and relevant research.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

PSYCH 677. Clinical Assessment Laboratory.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rudolph Clinton Hatfield (balute@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in PSYCH 674. Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This laboratory follows Clinical Assessment Laboratory I and accompanies Clinical Assessment (PSYCH 674). One new instrument is introduced, the Rorschach inkblot test. In this term each student completes two assessments including the Rorschach, the WISC or WAIS, story-telling techniques and other instruments as needed, and participates in the intensively supervised analysis of 4-6 others.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

PSYCH 678. Topics in Clinical Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nnamdi Pole (nnamdi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Topics in Clinical Psychology is a two term course designed to introduce first-year clinical psychology graduate students to the profession of clinical psychology. Clinical psychology is unique in its attempt to seamlessly blend the values of scientist and practitioner. The content of this course reflects the gravitational pull of these two poles of our field. In the second academic term, students will have the opportunity to spend an intimate 90 minutes with a psychologist whose work bears on clinical research or clinical practice. Time will also be devoted to administrative matters relevant to the clinical program. This course is specifically designed for UM clinical psychology graduate students and is not appropriate for students from other areas or other departments.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

PSYCH 679. History, Ethics, and Professional Issues in Clinical Psychology.

Section 001 — Ethics.

Instructor(s): Luis Oscar Gómez (lgomez@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

  1. Topics, themes, & methods: This course is designed for graduate students planning a career in clinical practice. It is meant to assist the student in acquiring the knowledge of ethical codes and mental health statutes necessary for a responsible practice. This goal is pursued by three means:
    1. A thorough review of the APA Code (Ethical Principles Of Psychologists And Code Of Conduct, American Psychological Association, adopted 2002, effective 2003), with an emphasis on knowing and understanding the wording of the code as well as the spirit of the principles.
    2. Study of concrete cases, the ethical dilemmas they present, and the decision strategies applicable in each case.
    3. Commentary and discussion of the underlying therapeutic and ethical goals of the APA principles and code.
    4. Discussion of the interplay between the ethical rules of the profession and the national and state-specific statutes that regulate the profession.
    5. Review of basic statutes and court decision — specifically those of Michigan, with some comparisons with the California Mental Health Code. And
    6. a brief introduction to the history of clinical psychology as a profession and how that history affects our understanding of the responsibilities and constraints involved in its practice.
  2. Most students will be graduate students in the Clinical Area, Department of Psychology; therefore, it is expected that students will have some understanding of what the practice of clinical psychology entails as a healing process and as a professional activity bounded by ethical and legal constraints. The course, however, is open to students from other helping professions who may want to review and master the APA code and the statutes.
  3. Students will be evaluated by their participation in class, three short examinations, and a final.
  4. Required readings will be from a textbook (Corey, Corey, and Callanan, Issues & Ethics in the Helping Professions, sixth edition, Brooks/Cole, 2003) and a course pack, which includes the APA Ethics code and selected statutes from the Mental Health Codes of Michigan and California.
  5. Methods of instruction: lecture, & discussion, some films that illustrate ethical quandaries and legal complications.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: WL:4 If the course is closed at Registration, the student should wait until classes start, and then attend the first class meeting. Policies and procedures for issuing permission numbers will be explained there.

PSYCH 681. Survey of Social Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Norbert W Schwarz (nschwarz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a course in scientific responsibility for the first year cohort of the social psychology area and joint program students admitted to social psychology. Throughout the three-term sequence, issues of professional and scientific behavior will be discussed. A set of focused readings on these topics will be examined during class discussions. Students will be expected to develop and hone their initial curriculum vitae during the course. The fall term consists of an overview of current faculty research projects, an introduction to available scholarly resources, and a general orientation to graduate level research in social psychology. At the end of the first term, students write and orally present an extended abstract of their first year research project (PSYCH 619). During the winter term, students discuss their progress on these projects with the cohort and present a more formal version of their PSYCH 619 research. During the third term (fall of the second year), each student will make a more formal presentation of their findings in class, in preparation for their presentation to the social psychology brown bag.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

PSYCH 685. Social Psychological Theories.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jenny Crocker (jcrocker@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: PSYCH 682; Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is for students who are planning to take the preliminary exam in social psychology during the spring-summer term. It covers the central issues of social psychology based on textbooks and primary sources. Enrollment is limited to students taking the prelim exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

PSYCH 687 / SURVMETH 612 / SOC 612. Methods of Survey Sampling.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James M Lepkowski (jimlep@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Two graduate-level courses in statistical methods. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See SURVMETH 612.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

PSYCH 689 / ANTHRCUL 760. Culture and Cognition.

Section 001 — [2 credits].

Instructor(s): Lawrence A Hirschfeld (lhirsch@umich.edu), Shinobu Kitayama (kitayama@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate student in Anthropology or Psychology and permission of instructor. (2-3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/689/001.nsf

See ANTHRCUL 760.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 706. Tutorial Reading.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Independent study.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

PSYCH 719. Supervised Research II.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is an individual instruction course. When enrolling for PSYCH 719, students must use the individual section number of a staff member.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

PSYCH 743. Human Learning and Memory.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David E Meyer (demeyer@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in psychology or approved joint programs. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Survey of major phenomena in the area of human learning and memory. Major sections of course: components of the memory system, encoding mechanisms, retrieval processes, and the structure of knowledge in memory.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

PSYCH 748. Cognition and Perception Preliminary Preparation.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David E Meyer (demeyer@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May be elected up to four times for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar provides broad coverage of topics in general cognitive psychology relevant for preparing to take the preliminary candidacy examination of the Cognition and Perception area in the Department of Psychology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 751. Cognitive Development.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Frederick J. Morrison (fjmorris@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in psychology or approved joint programs. Permission of the instructor is required for persons who are not graduate students in psychology or one of its combined or interdisciplinary programs. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/751/001.nsf

This is the general graduate course addressing cognitive development. Current research and theories are examined. Particular emphasis is on the development of cognition and information processing in childhood. The primary topics covered include the development of memory, reasoning, concepts and categorization, communication, learning and attention. Other topics would include infant perception, Piagetian theory, metacognition, self control, imagery, etc. The course is designed as a comprehensive survey of cognitive development, but also often touches on issues of cognitive instruction and education, cognitive development in different cultures, and intervention in cognitive development.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

PSYCH 759. Proseminar in Developmental Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Susan A Gelman (gelman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: The course is intended for first year graduate students in the developmental area; other students interested in the course should seek permission of instructor. Student must register for both Fall and Winter semesters to receive a grade. (2). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/759/001.nsf

This course reviews contemporary viewpoints in developmental psychology as well as ethical and methodological issues of particular concern to developmental psychologists. In addition, faculty present and discuss their current research. The course is a two-term course. Students enroll for 3 credits in the Fall, and 0 credits in the Winter, but receive grades at the end of the Winter. The course is intended for first year graduate students in the developmental area; other students interested in the course should seek permission of instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

PSYCH 770. Family Therapy.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Donna Kiyo Nagata (nagata@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Comprehensive introduction to family systems theory and therapy. We will critically review the main tenets of family systems theory, and compare and contrast major models or "schools" of family therapy, including psychodynamic, humanistic, structural, strategic, behavioral, and narrative approaches.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

PSYCH 776. Comparative Theories II.

Section 001 — Cognitive-Behavioral and Biological Approaches in Clinical Psychology.

Instructor(s): Donna Kiyo Nagata (nagata@umich.edu), Patricia J Deldin

Prerequisites: This course is a required course for graduate students in Clinical Psychology but is open to all graduate students. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/776/001.nsf

This course is a follow up to Comparative Theories I, which covered the psychoanalytic and social systems approaches in contemporary clinical psychology. Comparative Theories II covers cognitive-behavioral approaches and biological approaches. The course is required for graduate students in Clinical Psychology, but open to others who are interested.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

PSYCH 779. Practicum in Clinical Psychology.

Section 001 — [1 credit].

Instructor(s): Nnamdi Pole (nnamdi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: PSYCH 676 and 677 and permission of practicum supervisor. (1-4). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be elected more than once for credit.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Practicum Seminar is a two-term course designed to integrate practicum experiences with the academic mission of our clinical psychology program. Clinical work is usually anxiety provoking to a beginning clinician. While some anxiety is a common part of any new experience, too much anxiety on the part of the clinician can easily interfere with the goals of clinical work. For this reason, we will devote the first 30 minutes of each class to addressing concerns and anxieties that have come up in practicum placements. The rest of each class will be devoted to providing practical instruction on a range of topics relevant to beginning clinicians (application of clinical theory to practice, psychotherapy research, ethics, licensing, etc). This course is only open to UM Clinical psychology graduate students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

PSYCH 779. Practicum in Clinical Psychology.

Section 099 — [4 credits].

Instructor(s): Scott Langenecker

Prerequisites: PSYCH 676 and 677 and permission of practicum supervisor. (1-4). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be elected more than once for credit.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 779. Practicum in Clinical Psychology.

Section 233 — [4 credits].

Instructor(s): Jerome Miller (jmmiller@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: PSYCH 676 and 677 and permission of practicum supervisor. (1-4). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be elected more than once for credit.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 779. Practicum in Clinical Psychology.

Section 370 — [3 credits].

Instructor(s): Sandra Graham-Bermann (sandragb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: PSYCH 676 and 677 and permission of practicum supervisor. (1-4). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be elected more than once for credit.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 779. Practicum in Clinical Psychology.

Section 538, 539 — [4 credit].

Instructor(s): Nnamdi Pole (nnamdi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: PSYCH 676 and 677 and permission of practicum supervisor. (1-4). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be elected more than once for credit.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Practicum Seminar is a two-term course designed to integrate practicum experiences with the academic mission of our clinical psychology program. Clinical work is usually anxiety provoking to a beginning clinician. While some anxiety is a common part of any new experience, too much anxiety on the part of the clinician can easily interfere with the goals of clinical work. For this reason, we will devote the first 30 minutes of each class to addressing concerns and anxieties that have come up in practicum placements. The rest of each class will be devoted to providing practical instruction on a range of topics relevant to beginning clinicians (application of clinical theory to practice, psychotherapy research, ethics, licensing, etc). This course is only open to UM Clinical psychology graduate students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

PSYCH 779. Practicum in Clinical Psychology.

Section 544 — [4 credits].

Instructor(s): Catherine Lord

Prerequisites: PSYCH 676 and 677 and permission of practicum supervisor. (1-4). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be elected more than once for credit.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 786 / SOC 786. Research Design in Social Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Norbert W Schwarz

Prerequisites: Open to graduate students in social psychology, others by permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 787. Psychology of Emotions.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Barbara L Fredrickson (blf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/787/001.nsf

This course offers an in-depth exploration of research and theory on emotions that stretches across traditional psychological subdisciplines. Emotions are complex, multiply-determined phenomena — they influence our biochemistry, our thinking, our actions, our relationships, as well as our mental and physical health. The character of emotions changes over the life-course and reflects individual differences. This complexity and significance makes the study of emotions an especially exciting and challenging task for researchers. A number of recurring themes will emerge in our discussions over the course of the academic term. Among them are (1) the functions of emotions, in both present day and ancestral circumstances; (2) the ways people respond to and regulate their own emotion experiences; and (3) the extent to which cultural and gender-related differences in emotions exist. The format of this course is centered on in-class discussions of common readings and the issues these readings raise. Students are evaluated primarily based on papers, but also on class participation and a take-home final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 797. Development in Adolescence.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John E Schulenberg (schulenb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in psychology. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/797/001.nsf

In this seminar, we will examine adolescence and the transition to adulthood from lifespan, interdisciplinary, and cultural perspectives. We will focus on some basics, but the real emphasis will be on current issues in the theoretical and empirical literatures concerning the successful and less than successful negotiations of various transitions into, during, and out of adolescence. Out of necessity, coverage of relevant issues and topics will be selective rather than comprehensive. We will discuss, critique, and integrate a range of relevant conceptual and empirical readings, and comment on and assist in each other's relevant research as appropriate. Learning goals include the following: to think broadly and critically about developmental conceptualizations and methodologies; to focus on linking theory, methods, and intervention/policy; to collaborate and critique effectively; and to explore, crystallize, and express your own informed views concerning adolescence/young adulthood and the field of developmental science in general, and concerning your own area of interest in particular. Requirements and evaluation consist of four components: class involvement (e.g., readings-based discussion), class leadership, empirical article critique, and final paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

PSYCH 798. Psychology of Aging.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Marion Perlmutter (perlmut@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in psychology. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Questions about aging are becoming increasingly important at both an individual and societal level. As life expectancy increases, personal life plans should be reconceptualized, and as the number and proportion of older adults in our society increases, expectations about population needs and potential should be re-evaluated.

This graduate course will examine adulthood constancies and changes in biology, behavior, and thought. We will learn about typical adult aging patterns, explore the variability, causes, and plasticity of these patterns, and consider the individual and societal implications of them. By the end of the term, students should be able to characterize the usual and possible patterns of development and aging in adulthood, and should appreciate issues related to the design and utilization of research with older populations. We will begin with an overview of the context of aging in the U.S., including discussions of the demographics of past, present, and future older populations, and conceptual issues relevant to theory and research methods of development and aging. Adulthood age differences in biological, psychological, and social competencies will constitute the core of the course. Topics to be considered include physical capacities, health, health care, death and dying, sensation, memory, intelligence, reasoning, expertise, creativity, wisdom, personality, self concept, emotions, relationships, and roles associated with family, work, and community. The final portion of the course will address gender, ethnic, and cultural diversity in aging, as well as societal services, and policies related to the old.

The course involves a fairly heavy reading and writing load, and relies extensively on a course web site. All assignments are described on the web site and are to be submitted through it. The web site contains links to many readings and research materials needed for completion of assignments, as well as a place for student discussion. It is essential that all students do reading and writing assignments before the class in which they are covered. Students also are expected to participate actively in class and web discussions. Class sessions will primarily involve student presentation discussion. Grades will be based on the number of points students accumulate by completing assignments and exams, and participating in class and web discussion.

Students closed from registration can get on a wait list and come to the first class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

PSYCH 808. Special Seminar.

Section 001 — Curr Topic in Cog Neuroscience. Cognitive Neuroscience: The higher mental processes. [4 credits]. Meets with PSYCH 447.001.

Instructor(s): Edward E Smith (eesmith@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/447/001.nsf

Cognitive Neuroscience is an interdisciplinary field. Essentially, it is an attempt by cognitive psychologists and neuroscientists to discover how mental activities are implemented in the brain. The approach focuses on human cognitive processes and relies heavily on the methods and findings of neuroscience.

While much of the research in Cognitive Neuroscience has dealt with the sensation and perception, this course will focus on mental processes that are thought to be at a higher level. Such processes include:

  1. Long-term memory
  2. Short-term or working memory
  3. Executive processing
  4. Mental imagery
  5. Mental calculation
  6. Decision making
  7. Concepts & categorization
  8. Language use.

These eight processes comprise the major topics covered in the course. For each topic we will consider findings about how the process breaks down under certain forms of brain damage, as well as evidence about how the processes operates normally as revealed by neuro-imaging techniques. For the graduate students there will be additional meetings with the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 808. Special Seminar.

Section 002 — Decision Consortium Seminar. [1-3 credits].

Instructor(s): J Frank Yates (jfyates@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/808/002.nsf

This seminar is the primary forum for the Decision Consortium, a University-wide distributed center for scholarship on decision making. Each session involves a vigorous discussion of new ideas and research on problems that have significant decision making elements. The typical session is led by a member of the Consortium who presents recent developments in his or her research program. The session also features discussants who study similar issues who offer their views and suggestions about the problems the presenter seeks to solve. Sessions emphasize vigorous participation by all in attendance, including students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

PSYCH 808. Special Seminar.

Section 003 — Biopsychology Colloquium Proseminar. [2 credits].

Instructor(s): Stephen A Maren (maren@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Biopsychology Colloquium features invited speakers (open to all) and a graduate proseminar (enrollment restricted to first-year biopsychology graduate students).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

PSYCH 808. Special Seminar.

Section 004 — Neuropsychology of Autism. [3 credits].

Instructor(s): Jeffrey J Hutsler (hutsler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/808/004.nsf

Autism is a developmental disability defined by a triad of behavioral symptoms, including impairments in verbal and nonverbal communication, deficits in reciprocal social interactions, and a restricted repertoire of activities and interests. This course will focus on the neuropsychology of autism by examining major themes both in the history of the disorder and in the current literature. Potential topics to be covered within the context of these themes include: the neurobiology of autism; the genetics of autism; the spectrum of autism-related disorders; cognitive theories of autism; functional imaging and autism; and current standard, and alternative, (biologically-relevant) treatment programs. Neural organization and brain function will serve as the common context for each of these topics. The course itself will be composed primarily of lectures, current and historical readings, in-class discussions, and projects/presentations. Interested students may contact the instructor directly for additional information ( hutsler@umich.edu ).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

PSYCH 808. Special Seminar.

Section 005 — Professional Issues. [1-3 credits].

Instructor(s): Patricia A Reuter-Lorenz (parl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will focus on professional issues associated with preparing for the job market and succeeding in an academic career. The topics to be covered include the value of post-doctoral positions, job talk preparation and interviewing, dual-career and family issues, mentoring, publishing, journal reviewing, and grant writing. Evaluation will be based on class participation, student presentations, and a mock-grant application.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

PSYCH 808. Special Seminar.

Section 006 — Psychology of Teaching and Learning. [2 credits].

Instructor(s): Scott G Paris (sparis@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/808/006.nsf

The primary focus of this course is the study of theories, strategies, and resources related to the teaching of psychology. In response to the requests of students, this class was specifically designed to provide additional training and guidance for GSIs in the Psychology Department. As such, we will examine applications of psychological theory to the classroom (What can psychology tell us about learning and teaching?) and will also explore methods and strategies for teaching psychology specifically (What are effective ways to teach Psychology content?). This course will rely heavily on the expertise of graduate students and faculty across the department and will attempt to model multiple teaching formats and resources.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 808. Special Seminar.

Section 007 — Evolution and Epistemology. [3 credits]. Meets with ANTHRCUL 658.002 and NRE 639.117.

Instructor(s): Richard Nisbett (nisbett@umich.edu), Scott Atran (satran@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course concerns evolution and lay epistemology or how we come to know about the world. We examine knowledge for which the claim is made that it is in some sense "prewired," including theory of mechanics, theory of biology and theory of mind, and "hypotheses" about the nature of the world, including causal hypotheses and religious accounts. We consider what kinds of knowledge, though possibly prewired or "prepared" in some biological sense, is modifiable and what might be the role of culture and various kinds of material circumstances in modifying such prepared knowledge. We pursue Sperber's notions that some ideas are easier to think than others and more susceptible to contagion from one individual or population to another. A major theme of the course is that cognition is in the service of motives.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

PSYCH 808. Special Seminar.

Section 008 — Graduate Writing Seminar. [2 Credits].

Instructor(s): Susan Nolen-Hoeksema (nolen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The goals of this seminar are to help graduate students improve their professional writing skills. Several different types of professional writing will be addressed, including research statements, empirical articles, review articles, research proposals, and dissertations. Some class time will be devoted to discussion of readings on good writing, but the majority of class time will be spent discussing samples of writing by class members in small groups and in the larger class. Students should be prepared to produce samples of writing throughout the term and willing to have their samples discussed by the class. This seminar is intended for graduate students in psychology who are in their second through fifth years of the graduate program.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

PSYCH 808. Special Seminar.

Section 009 — Women's Mental Health and Illness: Contemporary, Clinical, and Cultural Perspectives. [3 Credits]. Meets with WOMENSTD 801.001 and RACKHAM 570.004

Instructor(s): Jane A Hassinger (jahass@umich.edu), Susan Nolen-Hoeksema (nolen@umich.edu), Kimberlyn Leary (kimleary@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This RIS seminar addresses the complex, interacting factors that influence mental well being for women across social and cultural contexts. While taking a feminist, historical perspective on our subject/s we will explore how cultures, at different periods in history have developed and employed concepts of mental/moral fitness to assign and control women's roles, forms of self expression, and behavior. An examination of multiple interactions among ideas and practices — defined primarily from western religious teachings (especially Christianity), from post-industrial U.S. social welfare approaches to mental and moral hygiene, and psychoanalytic understandings of personality development will help explicate our gendered constructions of "mentally healthy woman," "well-adjusted women," and "mentally ill woman."

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

PSYCH 808. Special Seminar.

Section 010 — Psychology and Anthropology of Terrorism. [3 credits]. Meets with ANTHRCUL 658.003.

Instructor(s): Scott Atran (satran@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Contemporary political and religious terrorists are often publicly perceived to be crazed cowards bent on senseless destruction who thrive in poverty and ignorance. Recent research indicates that they have no appreciable psychopathology and are as educated and economically well-off as surrounding populations. Why do so many in our society, including political leaders and media analysts, appear to be willfully ignorant of this. What, in fact, are the psychological and socio-cultural conditions in which terrorism thrives. Are there reliable selection factors for people becoming leaders of, or being recruited to, terrorist-sponsoring organizations? If terrorists are generally ordinary people, who span a society's normal distribution (education and intelligence level, economic and social status, etc.), then what makes so many of them ready to die in order to kill even children and other noncombatants? What psychological and anthropological insights might be used to effectively diminish terrorism, including our own society's contribution to the genesis and growth of terrorism at home and abroad?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

PSYCH 808. Special Seminar.

Section 011 — Autistic Spectrum Disorders. [1 or 3 credits].

Instructor(s): Catherine Lord (celord@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The seminar will meet twice a month. One meeting will involve a presentation by a researcher who does work on autism. We have invited a number of speakers from other universities, and will supplement this with seminars led by our own group. Topics will include current research in treatment, neurobiology and diagnosis in autistic spectrum disorders. A second meeting, hereafter referred to as the journal club, will focus on discussing recently published research on autism. Each journal club meeting will focus on the recent articles on autism in one or more journals from the last year or so. Participants taking the seminar for credit will lead the discussion for one journal, which involves reviewing a particular journal and selecting a couple of articles for the group to discuss. The discussion leader will give an overview to the group about the types of articles on autism found in the journal and then initiate discussion of the selected articles. Participants in the journal club should read the selected articles prior to the meeting in preparation for discussing them. Students taking the seminar for 1 credit are expected to do the reading, lead one journal club and participate in discussion. Students taking the seminar for 3 credits will lead a seminar and write a paper describing their topic of interest as well as leading one journal club.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 808. Special Seminar.

Section 012 — Antilium Project: Interdisciplinary Seminar on Analytic Craftsmanship. Meets with MECHENG 699.001

Instructor(s): Panos Y. Papalambros

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/mecheng/699/001.nsf

An interdisciplinary team of faculty works with students to develop disciplinary analytical models of the design process and link them with each other towards a comprehensive quantitative design framework. Each student must present a rigorous model of some aspect of the design process, demonstrate it on a design situation and respond to critical reviews by the class participants. Teams of students assess model interaction possibilities and the quantification of the tradeoffs embedded in cross-disciplinary design decision making

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

PSYCH 819. Supervised Research III.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an individual instruction course. When enrolling for PSYCH 819, students must use an individual section number of a faculty member.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

PSYCH 854. Seminar in Advanced Personality: Research Techniques.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert Sellers (rsellers@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/854/001.nsf

The main objective of the course is to help build a repertoire of research skills that students can bring to bear on their own research interests. As such, the course is designed to provide students with an overview of several methods associated with personality psychology. Particular emphasis will be placed on those methods currently utilized by faculty in the personality area. In addition, the course is designed to expose students to professional issues related to conducting and publishing their research in psychology-related outlets.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

PSYCH 858. Current Issues in Developmental Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Antonucci

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in psychology or approved joint programs. Permission of instructor required. Permission of instructor required. (2-4). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

PSYCH 862 / EDBEHAVR 801. Proseminar in Education and Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Phyllis C Blumenfeld (blumenfe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate students only and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The introductory proseminar for graduate students enrolled in the Interdepartment Graduate Program in Education and Psychology. Students in the program are trained to conduct research in school settings on significant educational problems related to: cognitive development; learning; instruction; motivation and social development; classroom and school organization; individual differences and special populations.

Continuation of first semester discussions of current topics in educational psychology with emphasis on classroom learning, motivation, and psychoeducational assessment. A major focus of this course is on research methods and helping students initiate and complete their first year research projects.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 878. Psychopathology Through the Lifespan II.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Edward C Chang (changec@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This discussion-based course will focus on a critical examination of notable theoretic and scientific issues involved in the study of adult psychiatric disorders as represented in the Diagnostic Statistical Manual (4th edition). Performance in this course will be based on a number of sources, including regular participation in class discussions, short thought papers based on assigned readings, an in-class presentation, and a research proposal related to the study of a specific adult disorder. Information regarding required textbooks and other reading materials will be indicated on the first day of class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

PSYCH 890 / SOC 850 / EPID 850. Psychosocial Factors in Mental Health I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Harold W Neighbors

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2). May be elected more than once for credit.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See SOC 850.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 958. Special Seminar in Personality and Development.

Section 002 — Education Psychology Advanced Proseminar: Perspectives for Psychologists. [3 credits]. Meets with EDUC 716.001.

Instructor(s): Kai Cortina (schnabel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/958/002.nsf

An advanced seminar on issues in education perspectives for psychologists. It is primarily for third- and fourth-year program students and is a required course. The seminar is designed to identify and review issues critical to "educationalists": researchers, those concerned with issues of training, policy specialists, and practitioners. The major focus is to become broadly conversant with the range of issues associated with the study and practice of education and to use this knowledge to analyze and reflect upon those issues. Participants will be encouraged to relate their scholarly interests to matters of practical significance.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

PSYCH 958. Special Seminar in Personality and Development.

Section 003 — Social Psychology of Education. [3 credits]. Meets with EDUC 720.001.

Instructor(s): Martin L Maehr (mlmaehr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a core course in the CPEP program, but students in all areas are welcome. An introduction will include topics such as the Expected Outcomes of Schools and Schooling, Social Psychological Perspectives on Achievement, Citizenship/Social Responsibility, Self-regulation, and "Well Being." Other aspects of the course are Culture, Student, and School (Sociocultural Influences on Schools, Teachers, and Students), "Group Dynamics" in Teaching and Learning, and "Organizational Behavior" in Educational Settings (School Administration and Leadership, School and Classroom "Cultures," School Intervention and Change). Readings will be selected from current journals and major scholarly works. A formal course syllabus will be available later in the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

PSYCH 958. Special Seminar in Personality and Development.

Section 004 — Learning in Museums. [3 credits].

Instructor(s): Scott G Paris (sparis@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar examines issues in visitors' experiences in museums, zoos, aquaria, gardens, and related community settings. Families, individuals, and students visit museums and community institutions for a variety of purposes including leisure, education, and curiosity. We will examine visitors' motivation, learning, and transformative experiences from psychological and educational perspectives. We will consider the parameters of contexts that support or impede learning, and we will examine the social dynamics of museum experiences. Students are expected to discuss the readings in class and participate in museum field trips and class presentations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 001 — Stereotype Threat. [3 credits].

Instructor(s): Denise J Sekaquaptewa (dsekaqua@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-5; 1, 3 or 5 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/988/001.nsf

This course will examine social psychological research literature addressing the influence of social stereotypes on performance. Topics will include: demonstrations of stereotype threat effects in women, African-Americans, Asian-Americans, and in other groups; moderators and mediators of this effect; evidence of the process by which stereotypes influence performance; alternative explanations of this effect; social implications. This course requires reading scientific articles in social psychology, discussion of the readings, and writing assignments (e.g., research paper).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 002 — Social Science Research Methods: Prog & Challenges. [3 credits]

Instructor(s): Norbert W Schwarz (nschwarz@umich.edu) , Daphna R Oyserman (daphna@umich.edu), James S House (jimhouse@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-5; 1, 3 or 5 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/988/002.nsf

This course addresses recent developments in social science research methods, including self-reports of attitudes and behaviors, implicit measures of attitudes, real-time data capture, and methods to assess the influence of social contexts on human behavior. The course is linked to a speaker series at the Research Center for Group Dynamics and participants are expected to attend the talks (Mon, 3:30-5:00pm, 6080 ISR) as well as class meetings prior to the talks. A detailed syllabus will be available in late November.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 003 — Translational Skills: The Real World, Research Plan, Research Method. [3 Credits]. Meets with Social Work DOC 860.

Instructor(s): Carol Mowbraw , Daphna Oyserman (daphna@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-5; 1, 3 or 5 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/988/003.nsf

Theory-based preventive interventions involve (1) developing a series of smaller scale studies that together constitute an evidence base for theory of change, (2) developing an intervention based on these studies, (3) piloting, refining, and testing the intervention, then bringing it 'to scale'. This course focuses on steps two and three of this process. It asks the question once the theory is in place and the intervention designed (on paper), then what? To take the next steps of implementing and testing a preventive intervention, researchers need to develop a community-researcher interface that is supportive of pilot and development work. This often means gaining entry to settings not familiar to academic researchers where the researcher frequently is seen as "the other." Successful field research intervention studies need to develop a service/evaluation team that is usually interdisciplinary and able to function well in carrying out a new and innovative project, which requires adherence to a program model as well as to a research design that typically involves random assignment. Moreover, moving into the field often requires funding, meaning that writing grant applications to get external funding for preventive intervention research is also a necessity. This class is about the skills needed to translate theory about how to prevent mental health problems or promote well-being into a research protocol that can be funded and tested. Further, the course will address topics in replication and dissemination, as well as questions of how to successfully disseminate so as to change established practices and how much in replication should reflect fidelity to the original model, versus adaptation to local circumstances.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U."

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

PSYCH 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate (Prerequisites enforced at registration). Permission of instructor required. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U."

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor


Undergraduate Course Listings for PSYCH.


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