College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term 2004 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2004 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Russian


This page was created at 6:21 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.

Winter Academic Term 2004 (January 6 - April 30)


RUSSIAN 402. Fourth-Year Russian.

Language

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Vitalij V Shevoroshkin (vvs@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: RUSSIAN 401. (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 403.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Continued work on vocabulary combined with the mastery of oral fluency and freedom of self-expression in speech and writing. Readings taken from Russian short stories and the press.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RUSSIAN 410 / EDCURINS 437. Teaching of Russian.

Language

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Snejana J Tempest (tempest@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. (2). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An exploration of the multiple aspects of language teaching, including theoretical background. Topics of discussion include intercultural understanding, drilling, testing, computer-assisted instruction, and multi-media technology. Emphasis on development of practical skills for classroom instruction. Optional textbook: Omaggio Hadley, Teaching Language in Context, 2nd edition.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

RUSSIAN 460. Russian Social Fiction.

Literature

Section 001 — Taught in English.

Instructor(s): Omry Ronen (omronen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Russian picaresque humor, satire, fantasy, and science fiction in the 19th and 20th centuries against the background of the occidental and oriental traditions. Textbooks:

  • Gogol, Dead Souls;
  • Erenburg, Julio Jurenito;
  • Tolstoy, The Garin Death Ray;
  • Il'f and Petrov, The Twelve Chairs; The Little Golden Calf;
  • Babel', The Forgotten Prose;
  • Bulgakov, The Master and Margarita;
  • Solov'ev, The Beggar in the Harem: impudent adventures in old Bukhara.

Lectures and discussion. Knowledge of Russian not required. Midterm reports and final paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RUSSIAN 479. Vladimir Nabokov and World Literature II: The American Years.

Literature

Section 001 — Meets with ENGLISH 482.003.

Instructor(s): Omry Ronen (omronen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Knowledge of Russian not required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course is the second part of the survey of Nabokov's life work. It will be devoted entirely to the American period of Nabokov's writing and cover his novels Bend Sinister, Lolita, Pnin, Pale Fire, Ada, Transparent Things, and Look at the Harlequins, as well as most of his English-language short stories and poems. Special attention will be paid to his activities as a translator, literary scholar, and educator. Students will be expected to read a wide selection of scholarly and critical works on Nabokov. Undergraduates concentrators in any field, including natural sciences, especially biology; graduate students of Slavic, English, Romance, German, and comparative literature, linguistics, and visual arts.

Three hours, lecture. Intensive reading; participation in class discussion; midterm report on secondary reading; final take-home examination or a research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RUSSIAN 499. Advanced Seminar in Russian.

Literature

Section 001 — Images of the "Provincial" in 19th- and 20th-Century Russian Culture. Taught in Russian.

Instructor(s): Michael Makin (mlmakin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: RUSSIAN 302 or 303, and 351. Taught in Russian. (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/russian/499/001.nsf

In Russia, the "provinces" begin at the edges of Moscow and St Petersburg — everything beyond the two "capitals" is "provincial" in the world's largest country. Thus the vast majority of Russians live in the "provinces", although the country's culture (as its economy and politics) is dominated by the two capitals. The geographical extent of Russia, the inaccessibility of even major centers of population, a very centralized institutional structure, obvious economic imbalances, and many other factors go into sustaining the sense that "provincial" Russia is remote, backward, and homogeneous. At the same time, opposite claims are often heard: that here is the "real" Russia, uncontaminated by non-native influences, unchanged by time, pure, and beautiful — a model from which the capitals have deviated to their own detriment.

This course will examine a series of images of the "provincial" in nineteenth and twentieth-century Russian culture, using readings not only from fiction, poetry, and travel narratives, but also from beyond the realm of belles lettres (there will be significant use of Internet resources, for example).

In a series of course modules we will explore how the Russian provinces have been imagined, presented, and distorted by those who inhabit them, by those who mythologize them, by those who dread them, and by those who love them. Three short papers, a final presentation, and a term paper. The course is taught in Russian, with participation in discussions required. All assignments are in Russian.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RUSSIAN 502. Fifth-Year Russian II: Contemporary Issues.

Language

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Tatyana V Kondratyeva

Prerequisites: RUSSIAN 501. (4). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This advanced language course is designed for students wishing to achieve high-level proficiency in spoken and written Russian. Drawing in diverse instructional materials about sociocultural, political, and/or economic issues in contemporary Russian, this course is accessible to students in range of disciplinary and professional degree programs.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RUSSIAN 652. Directed Reading in Russian Literature.

Russian Literature in Russian

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Permission of Chairman. Graduate standing. (1-4). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

RUSSIAN 795 / REES 795 / HISTORY 795 / POLSCI 795 / ECON 795 / GEOG 795. Research Seminar in Russian and East European Studies.

Section 001 — Meets with REES 401.001.

Instructor(s): William G Rosenberg (wgr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See REES 795.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RUSSIAN 856. Seminar in Russian Literature.

Russian Literature in Russian

Section 001 — Russian Literary and Cultural Theory and the West. Taught in English. Meets with RUSSIAN 476.001.

Instructor(s): Andreas Xavier Schönle (aschonle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines twentieth-century Russian critical theory in its relationship with Western literary and cultural theory. Translated works by the Russian Formalists, Soviet semioticians (Lotman and Uspensky), Bakhtin and his circle, as well as contemporary post-modernists will be discussed in the light of comparable Western approaches. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship between literature and the cultural environment. We will discuss issues such as literature as device, literature in its institutions, poetic form and play, aesthetic value and ritual, the theory of narrative and the search for a masterplot, the semiotics of literature, culture as text, dialogue and the novel, Marxist criticism, postmodernism and Stalinist ideology, and the mythology of everyday life in Russia and America. Among Western critics we will read works by Genette, Williams, Barthes, Hernstein Smith, Iser, Greenblatt, Jauss, de Man, Jameson, and Baudrillard. Very short weekly essays, one oral presentation, and one 15-page paper. Knowledge of Russian not required. All texts read in translation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RUSSIAN 857. Seminar on Tolstoy.

Russian Literature in Russian

Section 001 — Taught in English. Meets with RUSSIAN 464.001.

Instructor(s): Olga E Maiorova

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will cover some of the major works written by Leo Tolstoy throughout his long and extremely productive artistic life — from the 1850s through the beginning of the twentieth century. We will examine his masterpieces in connection with the religious, political, and social phenomena that shaped Russian intellectual life of that period. At the same time, we will learn how Tolstoy's writing changed the Russian intellectual landscape. This course will emphasize the main existential problems Tolstoy was deeply interested in, as well as his extraordinary views on literature and fine arts. We will also focus on Tolstoy's artistic devices and narrative means. The course will alternate lectures with discussions of assigned readings. All readings are in English translation. It is designed both for those with general interest in Russian literature, and for those with a specific, scholarly or literary interest in Tolstoy. No prior knowledge of Russian literature and culture is necessary. Evaluation of students' work will be based on essay, final test, and class-participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RUSSIAN 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U."

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

RUSSIAN 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate (Prerequisites enforced at registration). (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U."

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department


Undergraduate Course Listings for RUSSIAN.


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