College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term 2004 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2004 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Sociology


This page was created at 6:25 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.

Winter Academic Term 2004 (January 6 - April 30)


SOC 425 / GERMAN 432. The German Model: Business, Labor, and the State in the 20th Century.

Section 001 — Taught in English.

Instructor(s): Jeremy Brooke Straughn (straughn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing. Taught in English. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/german/432/001.nsf

See GERMAN 432.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SOC 447 / WOMENSTD 447. Sociology of Gender.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): PJ McGann (pjmcgann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an introduction to the sociological study of gender that focuses on how gender is embedded in social life. At the individual level, gender is an essential aspect of personhood and personal experience; at the institutional level, gender is a major way that societies differentiate their members. At both the individual and institutional levels, gender intersects with race, class, and sexuality to structure rights, privileges, and opportunities. Specific topics include gender identity, how individuals "become" gendered and "do" their gender(s), gender and sport, analysis of the binaric nature of the North American gender order, transgenderism, and intersexuality.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SOC 450. Political Sociology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jeffery M Paige (jpaige@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An introduction to political sociology with a particular emphasis on the relationship between economics and politics. Basic concepts such as power, state, nation, and class will be introduced and applied to the analysis of the development and change of political systems in historical and comparative perspective. The course examines (a) the historical origins of democracy, fascism, and communism as political systems, (b) imperialism, development, and revolution in the Third World, and (c) class, class coalitions, and the state in post New-Deal U.S. politics. Introductory courses in sociology or political science desirable but not required. Lecture/discussion; midterm and final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SOC 454. Law and Society.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Daniel H Sharphorn (dsharpn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One sociology introduction. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to examine the organization of law in society and the relationships between law and society. The approach will be primarily from a sociological perspective; however, we will also explore the views of legal scholars, anthropologists, political scientists, philosophers, and others. While the course will be a survey of "law and social organization" in general, we will focus on current topics of special interest as a device for our study: the death penalty, rape laws, affirmative action and anti-discrimination laws, university rules and regulations, and others. Students will be expected to gain an understanding of the extent of the study of law and social organization and the leading theories and ideas about it, and will be asked to think critically and independently about legal systems and the role of law in society.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SOC 455 / RELIGION 455. Religion and Society.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Terence James McGinn (tjmcginn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/soc/455/001.nsf

Since 9/11/01, religion has moved center-stage in the American consciousness. From the "War on Terror" to the "Pledge of Allegiance" case, religion is centrally involved in many of the social conflicts and movements that fill today's headlines: as a social identity, as a core set of beliefs, as a basis for social judgment, as a motivation for action.

This course uses sociological methods to explore the interplay of sacred and secular in modern society. What is religion and the religious? How is the sense of the sacred affected by the social? In what ways does religion, in turn, affect other areas of social life?

The class employs a variety of learning formats, including discussions, study groups, lectures, videos, and student research presentations. During the course we will also have 2 or 3 "virtual" guests (real-time web feed) who are either scholars in the field or "living cases" — individuals involved in current events related to religion and society.

Required readings are primarily in course pack form and include the writings of both classic and contemporary sociologists ranging from Weber and Durkheim to Berger and Bellah.

Students' understanding and integration of the material is demonstrated through a series of quizzes, three short papers, and a group presentation project.

Junior status or above is required. Upper-level sociology or religion concentrators may request overrides if the course is fully subscribed.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5, Permission of instructor

SOC 458. Sociology of Education.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David Schoem (dschoem@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One introductory course in sociology. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine the purposes and roles of schooling in society. We will explore issues of socialization, stratification, the social organization of schools and classrooms, and the uses of both formal and hidden curriculums. We will examine issues of inequality, race, class and gender, cultural transmission and social change in K-12 and higher education. We also will explore the role and experience of participants in schooling. Finally, we will examine contemporary issues in schools and possibilities for change in schools and change in society. Students are expected to be active participants in discussions and presentation of class readings and topics. There will be one short paper and a take-home exam. Students also will be expected to devote considerable time and effort to a research paper on some aspect of school change. Note: this Winter academic term, the class will participate in a number of the Brown vs. Board of Education Theme Semester events.

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SOC 475 / MEDCARE 475. Introduction to Medical Sociology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Renee Anspach (ranspach@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will explore social aspects of health, aging, and the health care system in American society. We will examine such issues as the social causation of disease, relationships between doctors and patients, the health professions, health care among women and the poor, current health care crisis in a national and cross-cultural perspective.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SOC 495. Special Course.

Section 001 — Nations and Nationalism. [3 credits].

Instructor(s): Genevieve Zubrzycki (genez@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One introductory course in sociology. (1-3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/soc/495/001.nsf

Nationalism has been one of the moving forces of the 20th century. In view of increasing "global" exchanges and the restructuring of political, economic and cultural life along supra national lines, some observers have been inclined to predict the "end of nationalism". The last decade has instead witnessed increased nationalist activity throughout the world. This course will introduce students to the main theories of nationalism and to approaches to national identity from various disciplines (sociology, history, anthropology, and political science). We will investigate the nature of nations and nationalism and the social processes behind their emergence as well as the causes of nationalist movements and conflicts. In the first part of the course, we will examine the main paradigms in the field: primordialist-perennialist, modernist, marxist, and culturalist. The second part of the course will be devoted to the close examination of thematical issues based on empirical cases.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, 5: Permission of Instructor

SOC 495. Special Course.

Section 002 — Detroit: Its History & Future. Meets 3/16, 3/18, 3/23, 3/25 with field trip on Sat. 3/20. [1 credit]. (Drop/Add deadline=March 19).

Instructor(s): Ren Farley (renf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One introductory course in sociology. (1-3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Theme Semester Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Detroit was the world's most important metropolis during the Twentieth Century. The world's most popular means of transportation was developed there — a means of mobility that produced social change and revolutionized economies on all populated continents. The system of modern industrial production was perfected in Detroit and then spread around the world, giving us low-priced, high quality consumer goods. The modern American blue-collar middle class developed first in Detroit thanks to the emergence of effective unions. More so than in other US cities, the wealth of Detroit's families in the 1920s led to a magnificent array of breath-taking buildings, homes and monuments. The Allies defeated the German and Japanese dictators in World War II because of the engineers and production line workers in Detroit — the world's true Arsenal of Democracy. Yet, more so than any other U.S. city, economic conflict was vividly played out in Detroit. Equally devastating has been racial conflict. Detroit is the only U.S. city in which the federal military has been called to the streets four times to stop whites and blacks from killing each other. Detroit, once the symbol of U.S. industrial prowess became, following World War II, the symbol of racial, economic and geographic polarization.

This mini course will examine social, economic and racial trends in metropolitan Detroit, looking both at their history and implications for the future. The course will consist of four classroom meetings and an all-day bus tour of metropolitan Detroit on a Saturday.

This section will meet on Tuesday, March 16 and Thursday, March 18th. Saturday March 20 will be spent touring metropolitan Detroit. Then this course will meet on the following Tuesday, March 23 and Thursday, March 25.

I strongly encourage the enrollment of both undergraduate and graduate students.

Classroom sessions will be devoted to a presentation and discussion of materials about Detroit linked to the readings. A portion of the final class will be devoted to a quiz about materials covered in the course. Assigned readings include the following:

Devil's Night and Other True Tales of Detroit by Ze've Chafets (New York:Random House, 1990). Copies may be borrowed from the instructor but must be returned to him. This book should be read before the first meeting of the course.

Detroit Divided by Reynolds Farley, Sheldon Danziger and Harry Holzer. (New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 2000)

The Origins of the Urban Crisis, Race and Inequality in Postwar Detroit, (Princeton,: Princeton University Press, 1996). Available in paperback for about $15-$16.

One section of Someone Else's House: American's Unfinished Struggle for Integration by Tamar Jacoby, (New York: The Free Press, 1998). Available in paperback for $14.40.

Chapters will be assigned from the several books listed, and these will be available from the University Library's on-line reserve system.

Requirements for this one-credit course include attending the four classroom sessions, the Saturday tour of metropolitan Detroit, the assigned readings and satisfactory completion of the quiz.

To obtain credit for this course, it will be necessary to attend every one of the four class meetings and the all-Saturday tour of Detroit.

For additional information or for a copy of the tentative syllabus, please send a message to the instructor: renf@umich.edu.

This will be an interesting and valuable course with a special appeal to those who are interested in metropolitan planning, in the history of cities or in those social, economic and racial trends that have shaped metropolitan America.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SOC 495. Special Course.

Section 003 — SOCIOLOGY OF JAPAN. Meets January 12, 26, Febraury 2, 9, 16. [1 credit]. Meets with CSJ 450.001. (Drop/Add deadline=January 26).

Instructor(s): Hiroshi Ishida

Prerequisites: One introductory course in sociology. (1-3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

mini/short course

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See CJS 450.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 495. Special Course.

Section 004 — Steam Engines and Computers, From Industrial Proletarians to Information. [3 credits]. Meets with HISTORY 498.001 and RCSSCI 461.001.

Instructor(s): Thomas O'Donnell (twod@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One introductory course in sociology. (1-3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~twod/steam/

See RCSSCI 461.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 495. Special Course.

Section 005 — Native American Social Movements. [3 credits]. Meets with AMCULT 453.001 and WOMENSTD 457.001.

Instructor(s): Andrea Lee Smith (tsalagi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One introductory course in sociology. (1-3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See AMCULT 453.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 504 / AMCULT 504. American Immigration: Sociological Perspectives.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Silvia Pedraza (spedraza@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; seniors with permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Both the study of immigration and the questions that study raises are at the very root of social science. In this course we survey the literature that gives evidence of the major concepts, questions, and approaches which sociologists have used to study immigration, as well as the interface between immigration, race, and ethnicity in America. In this seminar, we will seek to focus each session on a different topic, such as the origin of ethnic stratification, race, and racism; the contrasting theoretical explanations of assimilation and internal colonialism for the reality of group differences in social outcomes in America; the different levels of analysis, micro vs. macro approaches to immigration; the causes and consequences of the differential incorporation of immigrants in American society; political vs. economic immigrants as different social types; middleman minorities vs. the ethnic enclave vs. the ethnic economy as models of immigrant adaptation; women and migration; and social networks and gender as the link between micro and macro levels of analysis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 506. Theory and Practice.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mark S Mizruchi (mizruchi@umich.edu) , Renee Anspach (ranspach@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is the second of a two-term theory sequence required of all sociology department graduate students. We begin by exploring how classical and contemporary sociologists, representing a variety of perspectives and intellectual orientations, have theorized about several core issues: the nature of society and the social, the individual-society relationship, identity and the self, culture, and social structure. In the second part of the course we examine how sociological theories can illuminate several substantive areas in the discipline, including organizations and the economy, the professions, development, and various forms of social inequality.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 512. Practicum in Survey Research.

Section 001 — Detroit Area Study Practicum: Data Collection. Meets with SURVMETH 672.001.

Instructor(s): Martha Scott Hill (hillm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Undergraduates with permission of instructor. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/soc/512/001.nsf

This course focuses on learning survey techniques through classroom lectures and workshops by experts in survey methods, and by actively participating in the design and implementation of a full-scale survey. It is the first in the pair of courses constituting the Detroit Area Study (DAS) practicum and the second in the full series of DAS courses. The aim of this practicum is to provide working knowledge of the strengths and weaknesses of the survey method and its application to real-world issues. An optional proseminar (SOC 501) in the prior fall academic term has focused the issues the survey will cover and developed a draft questionnaire. The present course will carry that initial draft questionnaire through important survey design steps, including questionnaire-refinement, and on through data-collection stages, with accompanying instruction from experienced survey methodologists on the underpinnings of survey techniques and current research on survey methods. Those wishing to complete the practicum, and analyze survey data to produce an original research paper on a topic of their choice, can then take the final course in the DAS sequence (SOC 513) in the following fall.

The present course (512) concentrates on survey methods — development and testing of questionnaire, sample design and selection, pretesting, and interviewing — and produces a full-scale personal interview survey of residents in the metropolitan Detroit area. The course includes lecture/discussion sessions and workshops. During the workshops, students receive practical instruction in survey methods. The skills taught in the work groups are preparation for out-of-class fieldwork that culminates in students interviewing a scientifically selected sample of residents in the greater Detroit metropolitan area.

The topic of this winter survey concerns social transformation and the new world created by the information technology revolution. The focus is on transformations in social networks, social identity, social values, and work and consumer participation. The ethnic diversity of the greater Detroit area is of particular interest in this research.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 515. Economic Sociology and Organizations.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jason D Owen-Smith (jdos@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/soc/515/001.nsf

Economic sociology is an approach to the study of economic phenomena based on the notion that economic action is social action and that economic institutions are socially constructed and culturally and historically specific. This course is the core course for the Economic Sociology and Organizations program in the Department of Sociology. The course will introduce students to the key issues in the field. Topics include classical and neoclassical economic models of human action and sociological alternatives, including those of Marx, Durkheim, Weber, and Polanyi; the history of the large corporation; transaction cost economics; the power, neo–institutional, and embeddedness models of interfirm relations, sociological models of production, labor, and financial markets, and the role of economic institutions in the larger society, including their relations with political, cultural, and ideological spheres.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 523. Practicum in Qualitative Research Methods II.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Karin A Martin (kamartin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is the second of the two-term qualitative research practicum that introduces students to qualitative research (primarily participant observation and in-depth interviewing) through a variety of activities. In this academic term we will primarily be engaged in analyzing and presenting the data for others. As in 522, we will learn from reading others' accounts of qualitative data analysis and "how-to" books on qualitative work, but primarily we will learn from doing qualitative research and talking to each other about what we do. We will talk with each other about our findings, problems, issues, topics, substance, and all other research dilemmas in a variety of ways, in large group discussion in class, in small structured and unstructured group discussions in and out of class. Students will produce a final professional research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

SOC 535. The Urban Community.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey D Morenoff (morenoff@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Undergraduates with permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SOC 535.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/soc/535/001.nsf

This seminar examines (1) the major dimensions along which urban communities are socially stratified and organized and (2) the mechanisms through which local social context influences individual health and behavior. We will cover both classic and contemporary forms of urban sociology, from the Chicago School to the so-called "new urban sociology." Topics include neighborhood effects, racial/ethnic disparities in health and crime, the history and etiology of the urban "underclass," the neighborhood as a site of collective action and identity, spatial forms of racial/ethnic inequality, and theories of social capital and collective efficacy. Both ethnographic and quantitative research approaches will be considered as they bear on community-level social organization.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 547. Gender and Sexuality.

Section 001 — Meets with WOMENSTD 698.004.

Instructor(s): Jayati Lal (jlal@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/soc/547/001.nsf

This core course is intended to help students prepare for the prelim in gender and sexuality. We will ask what does the field of gender and sexuality look like? How did this field take shape? What are the substantive areas? What are the debates? We will read both empirical and theoretical work and will concentrate mostly on scholarship by sociologists and social scientists.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 555. Culture and Knowledge.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Genevieve Zubrzycki (genez@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/soc/555/001.nsf

This course is the core course for the Culture and Knowledge field in the Ph.D. program in the Department of Sociology. The course is designed as an introduction to the theoretical debates about culture, representation, and identity formation, and about issues of structure and agency raised by these debates. It explores classical and contemporary theoretical approaches to the study of culture and knowledge, and diverse methodologies including discourse analysis, narratives, frame analysis, and ethnography. We will focus on a few selected research areas that have been especially affected by the "turn to culture" including gender, race, class, and nation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 560. Power, History, and Social Change.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jeffery M Paige (jpaige@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 596. Special Courses.

Section 001 — Agency.

Instructor(s): Julia Adams (jpadams@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Some background in social psychology is desirable; Undergraduates with permission of instructor. (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

"Agency" is a fundamental concept — as well as sexy buzzword — in a wide variety of academic disciplines, and theories of agency abound. The uses of the concept and the forms of theory can also be quite contradictory. Even in everyday parlance, agents are commonly understood both as representatives or delegates on the one hand, and as the ultimate, autonomous springs of action on the other. This graduate seminar aims to get to the bottom of this conceptual and theoretical conundrum! We will survey, criticize and integrate the warring literatures on agency and agency relations, drawing on a range of material in the social sciences and humanities. The course will also create space for students to engage the implications of the material for their own research. Students at different stages in their graduate careers are encouraged to enroll, as well as students hailing from different disciplines, those who favor any and all theoretical perspectives, or those who are simply interested in taking up the array of problems surrounding "agency."

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 610. Statistical Methods.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mark S Mizruchi (mizruchi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: SOC 510; graduate standing. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/soc/610/001.nsf

This course is the second portion of the two-term sequence (Sociology 510, 610) required of all graduate students in the department of Sociology.. It consists of two weekly class sessions plus a lab-discussion. This term focuses on multivariate techniques, especially multiple linear regression. The lab sessions will be used to discuss problems encountered in the lectures and written assignments and to refine students' statistical computing skills. The course assumes knowledge of the material covered in Sociology 510. It assumes no mathematical knowledge beyond high school algebra, but students will have an opportunity to develop elementary skills in more advanced mathematical techniques.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 612 / SURVMETH 612 / PSYCH 687. Methods of Survey Sampling.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James M Lepkowski (jimlep@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Two graduate-level courses in statistical methods. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See SURVMETH 612.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 619. Quantitative Analysis of Data.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Yu Xie (yuxie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: SOC 610 and Graduate standing. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course teaches statistical methods for analyzing categorical data, with an emphasis on practical applications rather than statistical theories. Three classes of statistical models will be covered: loglinear models for count data, logit/probit models for discrete dependent variables, and hazards models for studying transitions with longitudinal data. Familiarity with multivariate linear regression models for continuous dependent variables is assumed.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 622. Social Stratification.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Hiroshi Ishida

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course surveys various theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of social stratification. Emphasis is placed on social inequalities by sex, race, and family background in attaining social status as measured by education, occupation, and income. Societal variations along both temporal and regional dimensions will be considered. Students are encouraged to critically evaluate the current literature and conduct their own research using individual-level data from censuses and surveys.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 630. Research Methods in Population and Human Ecology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Barbara A Anderson (barba@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: SOC 530. Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/soc/630/001.nsf

The demographic perspective has become increasingly important in the social sciences. Demographically-based life table measures of employment, marriage, and other socially important areas have become prominent. This course aims for the student to understand the philosophy, the strengths, and the weaknesses of demographically-based measures. An important issue is: What measure is appropriate for addressing what question? This course aims to enable students to apply demographic methods in areas such as education, marriage and marital dissolution, labor force analysis, and study of health status, as well as in the classic demographic areas of mortality, fertility, and migration.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 695. Directed Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Directed research on a topic of the student's choice. An individual instructor must agree to direct such research, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

SOC 696. Directed Reading.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

SOC 710. Advanced Topics in Quantitative Methodology.

Section 001 — Causal Inference in the Social Sciences.

Instructor(s): Yu Xie (yuxie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: SOC 610 and Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores and critiques advanced methods for conducting quantitative research in the social sciences. A special topic is chosen for a particular academic term, with relevant methods drawn from a wide variety of disciplines, including economics, education, epidemiology, psychology, sociology, and statistics. Particular attention is paid to quasi-experimental and observational research designs.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 825 / HISTORY 825 / ANTHRCUL 825 / CHIN 825 / ECON 825 / POLSCI 825. Seminar in Chinese History and Society.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Either language knowledge (Chinese or Japanese) or HISTORY 351 or POLSCI 355. Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See HISTORY 825.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

SOC 830. Research Seminar in Social Demography.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Axinn

Prerequisites: Population Background. Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-3). May be elected more than once for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is offered every term. Students in the Social Demography Program are expected to attend it continuously when in residence for 1-3 credits per term. Its objectives are to socialize students to be professional researchers and help students write research papers. It consists of the PSC Brownbag Seminar, the Student Research Forum, and group and individualized meetings with the instructor. Although students are enrolled for only 1 or 2 credits most of the time, they are required to register for full (3) credits at least once, in the term they complete and present a research paper. It is expected that students who use SOC 830 to fulfill their research seminar requirement in the Department of Sociology be enrolled in SOC 830 for at least two terms.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

SOC 850 / PSYCH 890 / EPID 850. Psychosocial Factors in Mental Health I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Harold W Neighbors

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2). May be elected more than once for credit.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar brings together a multi disciplinary set of faculty and students from sociology, psychology, health behavior and health education, and epidemiology to present and discuss research on the social and psychological sources of mental and physical health. Substantively, presentations will focus on the role of psychosocial and social structural factors in the etiology and course of health and illness, including the study of life events, chronic role strains, resources for adapting to potential stressors, and the actual process of coping and adaptation. The application of social epidemiology to problems of service utilization are also considered.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, 5, Permission of Instructor

SOC 988 / PSYCH 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 001 — Stereotype Threat. [3 credits].

Instructor(s): Denise J Sekaquaptewa (dsekaqua@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-5; 1, 3 or 5 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/988/001.nsf

See PSYCH 988.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

SOC 988 / PSYCH 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 002 — Social Science Research Methods: Prog & Challenges. [credits?]

Instructor(s): Norbert W Schwarz (nschwarz@umich.edu) , Daphna R Oyserman (daphna@umich.edu), James S House (jimhouse@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-5; 1, 3 or 5 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/988/002.nsf

See PSYCH 988.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

SOC 988 / PSYCH 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 003 — Translational Skills: The Real World, Research Plan, Research Method. [3 Credits]. Meets with Social Work DOC 860.

Instructor(s): Carol Mowbraw, Daphna Oyserman (daphna@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-5; 1, 3 or 5 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/988/003.nsf

See PSYCH 988.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

SOC 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U."

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

SOC 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Claire L Decoteau

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1). May not be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U."

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Witner Academic Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

SOC 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate (Prerequisites enforced at registration). (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U."

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4


Undergraduate Course Listings for SOC.


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