College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term 2004 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2004 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Spanish


This page was created at 6:24 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.

Winter Academic Term 2004 (January 6 - April 30)


SPANISH 405. Introduction to Spanish Linguistics.

Other Language Courses

Section 001 — Taught in Spanish.

Instructor(s): Teresa L Satterfield (tsatter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: SPANISH 275 and 276. Taught in Spanish. (4). May not be repeated for credit. A maximum of 3 credits of SPANISH 405 may be counted toward the Spanish concentration or academic minor program.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is open to both graduate and undergraduate students. SPANISH 405 is an introduction to the main concepts and methods of analysis in linguistic theory, focusing on Spanish.

The course has three main goals: (1) to serve as a general introduction to the goals and assumptions of generative grammar (that is, to describe language as a property of the human mind), (2) to develop some beginning tools of formal linguistic analysis via the examination of selected syntactic(sentence structure), morphological (word formation), phonetic and phonological(sound system), and semantic (meaning) properties of Spanish, and (3) to examine the relationship between formal linguistics and other fields, looking in particular at the question, "What is Hispanic linguistics?" The main part of the course focuses on linguistic analysis.

This course is taught in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 410 / ROMLING 410. Spanish Phonetics and Phonology.

Other Language Courses

Section 001 — Taught in Spanish.

Instructor(s): Olga Gallego (ogallego@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: SPANISH 275 and 276. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will offer participants a theoretical foundation in Spanish phonetics and phonology. It includes the study of articulatory phonetics, phonological theory, distinctive feature analysis, practice in transcription, lab practice, contrastive analysis of English and Spanish sounds, with special attention to those sounds of Spanish that are most difficult for English speakers to acquire. The grade will be based on a midterm and a final exam, four quizzes, various homework assignments, and a final paper.

This course is conducted in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 435. Independent Study.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Permission of department. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 3 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course exists to enable students who have begun work on some author or topic to carry their study further under a professor's guidance. The work to be done should not be the same as that done in a regular course offering. A description of the project and the required exercises to be completed, as well as a list of pertinent bibliography must be submitted to the Concentration Advisor no later than the second week of the term, for the approval of the Spanish Undergraduate Curriculum Committee. ) The Committee is to receive a copy of any lengthy paper submitted in the course.

Detailed instructions and proposal forms are available on the Romance Languages website.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

SPANISH 437. Introduction to Literature Studies and Criticism.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 — La literatura como vocación. Taught in Spanish.

Instructor(s): Sergio Hugo Moreno (shmoreno@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Históricamente, en Occidente el término "literatura" ha tenido distintos significados: como un tipo de saber, como cultura o erudición, como pilar de la cultura, como escritura, como un conjunto de determinadas obras escritas, como una disciplina académica, como un documento social, etc.. En este curso trataremos a la literatura como una vocación, es decir, como un llamamiento y como una pasión. Primeramente, leeremos algunos textos relacionados con el tema de la vocación en general y de la vocación artística y literaria en particular. Estos textos nos ayudarán a mejor entender el fenómeno de la vocación desde diversos puntos de vista: histórico, social, cultural, económico y filosófico. Luego leeremos algunos textos en que sus autores o sus personajes entienden y viven la literatura como una vocación. Posteriormente, leeremos capítulos de las memorias de algunos autores que han escrito sobre el despertar, el desarrollo y las particularidades de su vocación literaria. Hacia la segunda mitad del curso, leeremos algunos capítulos de diversos manuales que tratan sobre cómo canalizar eficaz y productivamente la vocación literaria. Nos concentraremos en algunos aspectos prácticos y técnicos sobre el arte de componer novelas (sobre el arte de la descripción, de creación de personajes, la construcción de la trama, el uso del lenguaje, el manejo del tiempo, etc.). Finalmente, dedicaremos las últimas semanas del semestre a la lectura y al análisis de dos novelas en que autores famosos figuran como personajes.

Aunque algunas de las lecturas serán en inglés, tanto las conversaciones en clase como la escritura en casa serán en español. La nota estará basada en la participación y la asistencia (25 %), una composición (25%) y un diario o cuaderno de memorias enfocado en el tema de su propia vocación, o su búsqueda de una vocación (50%).

This course is taught in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 440. Literatures and Cultures of the Borderlands: The Politics of Language.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 — Latino/a Literatures: Examining the Anxiety of Representation in a Growingly Conservative Culture. Taught in Spanish.

Instructor(s): Lucía M Suárez (suarez@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level course. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will engage in a sustained analysis of recent Latino/a Literary production and filmic representation. We will investigate the impact of memory, stereotyping, and trauma on the construction of Caribbean, Latino/a, Latin American identity politics. In particular, we will critically explore the political role literature and film do/or do not play to inform current education policies (i.e., affirmative action) and racial and ethnic representations (i.e., media glamour versus discriminatory vilification).

This is an advanced class, which will require intensive participation, focused readings, and additional research. You are expected to keep journals from which we will read in class. They will be collected once in the semester. Classes will be conducted in Spanish. Writing assignments will be expected in Spanish. Due to availability issues, a number of the texts are in English. This "bilingual condition" is central to our research and discussions and is reflected in both the way this syllabus is fashioned and the readings we will be doing.

This course is conducted in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 450. Middle Ages.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 — Taught in Spanish.

Instructor(s): Catherine Brown (mcbrown@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/spanish/450/001.nsf

"The past is a foreign country. They do things differently there." So says an English novelist in 1953. If the early 20th century feels like a foreign country, what about the Middle Ages? What to say about the Middle Ages in Spain? This class will think about travel and time, about time travel too, and about the confrontation with the "not-me" that any travel — historical, imaginative, or spatial — entails.

We'll read things written in the Iberian peninsula from the 10th through the 14th centuries: an epic about border-making and border-crossing (the Poema del Cid ), the tale of a wandering, skirt-chasing priest (the Libro de buen amor ); we may even watch some time-travel movies. We'll read first-person stories of journeys made by real medieval people (Benjamin of Tudela; a woman named Egeria), and study the greatest of all travel routes in the period, the pilgrimage road to Santiago de Compostela, at the very Western edge of what for Europeans was the known world.

Will we come back the same people from a trip to the end of the world?

This course is taught in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

SPANISH 456. Golden Age.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Enrique García Santo-Tomás (enriqueg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

I. Descripción y objetivos del curso

El presente curso estudiará una serie de textos canónicos desde una perspectiva contemporánea, enfatizando su contextualización socio-política, histórica y literaria, además de nuevos acercamientos que se adapten a la sensibilidad moderna. Se analizará poesía, teatro y narrativa, en un diseño que prestará atención cuestiones como el 'yo' poético en su transición del Renacimiento al Barroco, la creación de una dramaturgia nacional de sabor autóctono, y la inauguración de nuevos modos narrativos como la picaresca o la novela corta. Los autores a estudiar serán Garcilaso de la Vega, Fray Luis de León, Santa Teresa de Jesús, San Juan de la Cruz, Cervantes, Lope de Vega, Góngora, Tirso de Molina, Quevedo y Calderón de la Barca. El curso se completará con proyecciones audiovisuales sobre Velázquez, la Inquisición, Don Quijote y Fuenteovejuna. La clase será en español.

II. Criterios de evaluación y textos de clase

Preparación y participación: 25%. Tres exámenes parciales: 20% cada uno. Informe oral: 15%. Se requiere la compra del Course pack (DollarBill), del Lazarillo y de Fuenteovejuna (Shaman Drum).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 467. Literary and Artistic Movements in Latin America/Spain.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 — Questioning Everything: Literature and Thought in Early 20th-Century Spain. Taught in Spanish.

Instructor(s): Juli A Highfill (highfill@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). May be elected twice for credit. For Grad credit, must also do a 20 page research paper.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Is it truly possible to question everything? Or, in any given place and time, do historical forces bring certain questions to the forefront while putting others off-limits? In totalitarian societies, of course, censorship works overtly to ban certain questions and utterances. But societies free of official censorship also set parameters that mysteriously circumscribe what can be asked, thought, and said, or even imagined. In this course, we will focus on the first few decades of 20th-century Spain, a time when those parameters suddenly expanded, giving writers, artists, and early film-makers remarkable freedom to posit provocative and irreverent questions. In their works, they challenged the Spanish nation and its "eternal myths"; questioned religious faith and the existence of God; mocked and defied political authority; destabilized notions of selfhood, sexuality, and gender roles; blurred the lines between life and art, sense and nonsense; and took up the new atomic physics to rethink concepts of matter and time. We will critically examine this questioning process in the early 20th century, considering both its freedoms and its limits. In the final class meetings, we will reflect critically on our own time and place, as we discuss what questions are — and are not — being asked and explored today in our culture. What are the forces that impinge on the creative questioning process today, both creating and limiting its possibilities?

Assignments include: two exams, two essays (6-7 pp. each), and a final "think-piece" (3-5 pp.) based on field-work and critical reflections. Active class discussion is an essential component of the course. Class will be conducted in Spanish.

Major texts include poetry by Antonio Machado, Sonata de otoño by Valle-Inclán, Niebla by Unamuno, El público by Lorca. Additional texts by these writers, along with short works by Zambrano, Salinas, Gómez de la Serna will be collected in a course pack. Other course materials include films by Buñuel and paintings by Dalí.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 485. Case Studies in Peninsular Spanish and Latin American Literature.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 — Hispaniola: One Island, Two Nations. Taught in Spanish.

Instructor(s): Lucia M Suárez (suarez@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will examine the production of Dominican literature in relationship to Dominican-American (Latina/o) writing; and Haitian literature with respect to the literary production of the Haitian diaspora. We will investigate how the Trujillo and Duvalier dictatorships shaped discourses of nationality, ethnicity and race, and how these, in turn, stimulated a consequent literary reaction.

Fictional texts such as Julia Álvarez' In the Time of the Butterflies and Edwidge Danticat's The Farming of Bones, have brought international attention to the poverty stricken region of Hispaniola. Mario Vargas Llosa's recent novel, La fiesta del chivo situates the Trujillo dictatorship among the chain of Latin American dictators of the twentieth century. In contrast Stephen Alexis' work points to the beginnings of Haitian nationalism as an exemplary model of independence gone awry. This region of intense violence and trauma is sculpted not by the silence and fear that it often witnesses, but rather, by courageous writers in exile. We will explore the meaning of writing fiction and its use as a tool of testimony.

This class is reading intensive. It will be conducted in Spanish. If any students read in French, recommendations for work not in translation will be made.

This course is taught in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 485. Case Studies in Peninsular Spanish and Latin American Literature.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 002 — Lorca. Taught in Spanish.

Instructor(s): Juli Highfill (highfill@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will focus on the poetry and drama of Federico García Lorca. As we read and discuss his works, we will also consider how his interests and activities shed light on "lived history." We will examine, for example, Lorca's years in the "Residencia de Estudiantes" with Dalí and Buñuel; his interest in gypsy and Andalusian culture; his involvement in surrealism; his year in New York, where he witnessed the stock market crash of 1929; his work in the traveling theater troupe "La Barraca" — a cultural program organized by the Spanish Republic; and his death in the first weeks of the Spanish Civil War. Primary texts include: El romancero gitano, Poema del cante jondo, Poeta en Nueva York, Yerma, Así que pasen cinco años, and El público. Assignments include: two exams, two papers (7-8 pp. each), and annotated bibliography (with 6 critical articles), and a group production of a scene from one of the plays. Class conducted in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 488. Topics in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 — Spanish in the United States. Taught in Spanish

Instructor(s): Teresa Satterfield (tsatter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Spanish has been spoken in what is now the United States longer than English has. With the increase in Spanish speakers in U.S. cities both through internal generation and continued migration, there has also come fresh interest in several aspects of linguistic investigation. This course is open to graduate and undergraduate students. We will explore a variety of regional aspects concerning Spanish in the US, ranging from sociolinguistic issues among Dominicans in New York and Cubans in Miami to the adoption and adaptation of forms from Nahuatl and English in the southwestern US. The class will be organized into sections covering interpreting; historical perspectives; borrowings of words and phrases; codeswitching, narratives, and discourse; sociolinguistics and pragmatics; phonology, morphology, and syntax; and language attitudes and planning. The aims of the course are three-fold: 1) to show the range of Spanish across the U.S.; 2) to highlight both established and younger scholars who have made important contributions to the study of Spanish and to the field of linguistics; and 3) to illustrate the principal trends and methods of analysis in specific linguistic disciplines.

This course is taught in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 488. Topics in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 002 — Lorca. Taught in Spanish.

Instructor(s): Juli Highfill (highfill@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will focus on the poetry and drama of Federico García Lorca. As we read and discuss his works, we will also consider how his interests and activities shed light on "lived history." We will examine, for example, Lorca's years in the "Residencia de Estudiantes" with Dalí and Buñuel; his interest in gypsy and Andalusian culture; his involvement in surrealism; his year in New York, where he witnessed the stock market crash of 1929; his work in the traveling theater troupe "La Barraca" — a cultural program organized by the Spanish Republic; and his death in the first weeks of the Spanish Civil War. Primary texts include: El romancero gitano, Poema del cante jondo, Poeta en Nueva York, Yerma, Así que pasen cinco años, and El público. Assignments include: two exams, two papers (7-8 pp. each), and annotated bibliography (with 6 critical articles), and a group production of a scene from one of the plays. Class conducted in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 635. Independent Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of advisor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the department faculty. Independent study proposal forms are available on the Romance Languages website.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

SPANISH 669. Studies in the Theatre of the 17th Century.

Section 001 — Material Culture and the Baroque Stage.

Instructor(s): Enrique García Santo-Tomás (enriqueg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

La noción de material culture no es sino una intervención crítica plural, escurridiza y joven que tiene, sin embargo, una larga genealogía cimentada en el poder evocativo del objeto. En toda aproximación a nuestro pasado la acuñación de "cultura material" surge entonces como un área de estudio no disciplinar, sin antepasados visibles y abierta a todo tipo de enfoques más allá del meramente literario. Desde su origen ligado primordialmente a la arqueología o desde las diversas teorías de consumo, el término parece extenderse rápidamente en la crítica contemporánea, que recibe esta "no-disciplinariedad" como una de sus virtudes prácticas y ventajas conceptuales — afortunadamente, el estudio y significado de objetos no ha dado lugar a una disciplina autónoma, lo que permite su traslación a territorios como el del presente seminario. Estos mismos objetos son entonces en sí significativos — más allá del significado que transmitan — permitiendo al estudioso ampliar el campo de análisis a cuestiones de identidad en la relación con el individuo, y demostrando cómo los consumidores son un campo de exploración tan importante como lo pueda ser el de los productores.

Los primeros indicios de actividad capitalista corren paralelos al nacimiento del teatro comercial en España — de hecho, esto último deriva de lo anterior, convirtiéndose en su paradigma cultural por excelencia — y la comedia urbana refleja fielmente estos cambios. Tejidos, materias, bienes importados y manufacturas locales desfilan por algunas de las piezas maestras del período a cargo de Lope de Vega, Tirso de Molina, Ruiz de Alarcón o Calderón de la Barca. Y el carro de los autos sacramentales, el corral de comedias o el palacio son, igualmente, materias de estudio. El presente seminario explorará precisamente cómo viene a nacer este arte nuevo, así como sus más interesantes manifestaciones. A los textos indicadas por el profesor el estudiante añadirá una serie de lecturas complementarias con el fin de ampliar lo máximo posible su conocimiento histórico y literario del período. Habrá un ensayo final y una serie de informes semanales. Las charlas serán en español, si bien se permite intervenir al estudiante en la lengua que prefiera.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 670. Chronicles, Epic, and History in Early Latin American Narrative.

Section 001 — 19/20c Lat Am Fiction: Rayuela.

Instructor(s): Santiago Colás (scolas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Come play Rayuela!

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 855. Special Topics Seminar.

Section 001 — Mexican War Machines. Taught in Spanish.

Instructor(s): Gareth Williams (garethw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine the relation between culture, war, and the formation of the modern Mexican nation-state, playing particular attention to the culture of the Mexican Revolution, the critique of the post-Revolutionary State and the events and languages of October 1968, and the emergence of Zapatismo under neoliberal capitalism.

This course will be taught in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 881. Current Issues in Literary Theory and Criticism.

Section 001 — Postcolonial Theory, Poststructuralism and Marxism: A Dialogue.

Instructor(s): Gustavo Verdesio (verdesio@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and two 600-level literature courses. (3). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/spanish/881/001.nsf

The idea behind this course is to discuss how some of the theoretical contributions that are the foundation of many a debate in the humanities today relate to each other. Marxism, although not embraced by a large number of practitioners of postcolonial theory, is still a theoretical reference for intellectual production coming from peripheral countries or from diasporic third world intellectuals. Postcolonial theory is in dialogue with both Marxism and poststructuralism, an umbrella- concept that will allow us to review the works by French thinkers like Foucault, Derrida and Deleuze. We will also see combinations of these three theoretical schools in authors such as Gayatri Spivak and Judith Butler, who write from a locus of enunciation that takes gender into account.

Course will be taught either in Spanish or English, depending upon the decision of the class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 895. Independent Study.

[3 credits].

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the department faculty. Proposal forms and detailed instructions are available on the Romance Languages website.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

SPANISH 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U."

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

SPANISH 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate (Prerequisites enforced at registration). Permission of instructor required. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U."

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a Doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department


Undergraduate Course Listings for SPANISH.


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