Courses in Psychology (Division 455)

The Department of Psychology offers three regular introductory courses which differ in focus: Psychology 170, Psychology 171, and Psychology 172. Psychology 170 is offered as a natural science and stresses experimental psychology; Psychology 171 is offered as a social science and stresses social psychology and interpersonal behavior; Psychology 172 is approved for social science distribution but treats both perspectives with about equal weight. Students may elect Psychology 170 and 171, but students may not receive credit for Psychology 172 and either Psychology 170 or 171. Any of the three courses meets the prerequisite requirement for concentration and serves as a prerequisite for advanced courses.

170. Introduction to Psychology as a Natural Science. Credit is granted for both Psych. 170 and 171; no credit granted to those who have completed 172, 190 or 192. Psych. 170 may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (NS). Students in Psychology 170 are required to spend four hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects.

This course presents material about biological and cognitive areas of psychology. It does NOT emphasize psychotherapy and mental illness, which are included in Psychology 171. It DOES cover topics such as perception, memory, animal behavior, and the human brain as a biological system. The course meets four hours per week. Sections are taught by graduate teaching fellows who have responsibility for their own sections.

171. Introduction to Psychology as a Social Science. Credit is granted for both Psych. 170 and 171; no credit granted to those who have completed 172 or 192. Psych. 171 may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (SS). Students in Psychology 171 are required to spend four hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects.

This course typically covers such topics as child development, interpersonal relations, social psychology, psychopathology, treatment approaches, learning, memory, motivation, emotion, personality, and others. Each section differs somewhat in content, instructional methods, and evaluation. Students originally register for a Time Slot ONLY (sections 001-009). Students should check the Final Edition of the TIME SCHEDULE for day/time/place of the MANDATORY meeting for their time slot section (001-009). At this meeting, students will be given a chance to read course descriptions of instructors in their Time Slot, instructors will be available to answer questions regarding their individual section(s), and students will then complete a "Choice Form" rank ordering their choice(s) of instructor. Final Class Role Sheets will be posted at the Psychology 171 office. If a student is unable to attend either the first meeting of his/her registered section (001-009) or the Wait List meeting, he or she MUST CALL THE OFFICE (764-9179) PRIOR TO THE MEETING TO RETAIN THEIR SPACE IN THE COURSE OR ON THE WAIT LIST. Wait List (section 099) students MUST attend the Wait List meeting listed in the Time Schedule to be placed in an open section. Syllabi will be posted at the Psychology 171 office prior to registration and TAs will set up open office hours at which time students can stop in the office and get additional information regarding the section of their choice. For further information, regarding open office hours, call the Psych. 171 office 764-9179.

204. Individual Research. Introductory psychology and permission of instructor. May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for a total of 6 credits.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake individual research under the direction of a member of the staff. Students are provided with the proper section number by the staff member with whom the work has been arranged. Students are responsible for properly registering for this course.

206. Tutorial Reading. Introductory psychology and permission of instructor. May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for a total of 6 credits.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake individual plans of study under the direction of a member of the staff. Students are provided with the proper section number by the staff member with whom the work has been arranged. Students are responsible for properly registering for this course.

300. Field Practicum. Introductory psychology and permission of a departmental Board of Study. Degree credit is granted for a combined total of 15 credits elected through Psych. 201 and 300-309. A combined total of 6 credits of Psychology 300-309, 504, and 506 may be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). Credit is granted for a combined total of 12 credits elected through the series Psych. 300-309.

This general description covers Psychology 300-309.

The field practicum course offers students an opportunity to integrate experiential and academic work within the context of a field setting. Students work in various community agencies and organizations; meet regularly with a faculty sponsor to discuss their experiences; read materials which are relevant to their experiences; and create some form of written product that draws experiences together at the end of the term. Obtain materials as early as possible as it generally takes students some time to meet requirements necessary to register for the course. N.B. This course is an Experiential course and no more than 30 credits may be counted toward the 120 hours required for graduation.

308. Field Practicum. Introductory psychology and permission of a departmental Board of Study. Degree credit is granted for a combined total of 15 credits elected through Psych. 201 and 300-309. A combined total of 6 credits of Psychology 300-309, 504, and 506 may be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). Credit is granted for a combined total of 12 credits elected through the series Psych. 300-309.

SECTION 001: WORKING WITH CHILDREN. Directed experience with children aged 18 months 5 years at the University's Children Center for Working Families for approximately 6-10 hours/week on a regular basis. Seminar relating theoretical issues to applied practice is held every two weeks. No prerequisites required. Course is intended to introduce students to children in a naturalistic setting (Sternberg)

310. Superlab in Psychology as a Natural Science. Introductory Psychology or a strong background in the natural sciences. (NS).

This course fulfills one of the advanced laboratory requirements in Psychology and may be counted toward either a B.A. or B.S. degree. It is designed to acquaint psychology concentrators with a wide range of methods and topics applicable to the scientific study of behavior. Topics of study include vision and perception, neural information processing, pattern recognition, memory systems, language, problem solving, and decision making. Particular emphasis is placed upon experimental methods and design, data analysis and statistical inferences. Student evaluation is based upon laboratory reports and participation, two exams, and one term paper. The course is also appropriate for students in various other degree programs related to the scientific study of psychology.

362. Teaching or Supervising Laboratory or Fieldwork in Psychology. Permission of instructor. (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be elected for credit more than once.

Open to departmental undergraduate Teaching Assistants. Provides an opportunity to take part in the instructional process in areas in which the student has demonstrated prerequisite knowledge and skills. Under staff supervision, students teach and supervise other students in discussions, labs and field work. Students are provided with the proper section number by the staff member with whom the work has been arranged. MAY NOT BE ELECTED FOR CREDIT MORE THAN ONCE.

363. Individual Behavior in Organizations. Introductory psychology or permission of instructor. (SS).

This course provides an overview of organizational psychology, emphasizing individual behavior in organizational settings particularly work settings. It is designed to be the first course in the organizational psychology sequence which also includes 464 (group behavior in organizations) and 565 (organizational systems). Major topics include work-related attitudes; motivation; leadership; decision-making; group-behavior; organizational design; organizational change; quality of working life; and work and society. Each week there will be a general lecture and one group discussion section. The discussion section will review the materials of the readings and lectures and will illustrate through cases and other means the application of some of the concepts introduced in the readings and lectures. (Carlopio)

382. Introduction to Social Psychology. Introductory psychology. (SS).

SECTION 001. This course introduces students to current and classical theory and research in social psychology. Overall focus is on ways in which individual thought and action are shaped by our social nature. Among the subjects to be examined are attitudes and social cognition, roles and norms, conformity, persuasion, group influence, altruism, aggression, prejudice, interpersonal attraction, and conflict resolution. In addition to reading the textbook SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (Meyers, 1986) and JULY'S PEOPLE, a novel by South African Nadine Gordimer, students will read works taken from outside social psychology whose topics correspond to the topics addressed in the textbook. Lectures, readings, writing, films, group demonstrations, and group discussion. Weekly objective tests, three papers, and objective, comprehensive final exam. (Landman)

Section 102. Designed to educate students about (1) the application of scientific inquiry to the domain of human experience and behavior; (2) specifically, the reciprocal influence of the individual and his/her social environments. Intended as a contribution to students liberal education, particularly to make them more aware of how their motives, attitudes, and skills are determined by the interpersonal relations, social organizations, and cultures in which they participate; and under what conditions they in turn influence these social environments. Classes will consist of two lecture/presentations and a course pack consisting of original articles of social psychological research. Students grades will be based on written work: periodic take-home short-essay examinations and a term paper. (Gold)

401. Special Problems in Psychology as a Social Science. Introductory psychology; intended for freshmen and sophomores. Only 6 credits of Psych. 400, 401, 402 and 500, 501, 502 combined may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology, and a maximum of 12 credits may be counted toward graduation. (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Section 101 PEER COUNSELING SKILLS. This new course, which is open to freshmen through seniors, is designed to explore the basic principles, techniques and developmental issues involved in peer counseling. The class size will be limited to 20 in this two credit mini-course so as to encourage discussion and participation in role play exercises. Appropriate readings and class discussion will address such issues as confidentiality, empathy, listening and communication skills. While there will be no examinations, there will be weekly essay questions and a longer final paper. These written assignments and in-class exercises will give an opportunity to apply the theory and technique of peer counseling. Some of the readings and discussion will focus on issues of self understanding in adolescence and adulthood, and on research issues in the field. While there are not required prerequisites for this class, it would be helpful for students to be curious about peer counseling and have a capacity for empathy and self understanding. High school volunteers may participate in some of the role play situations so that college students can practice some of their counseling skills. Some of the class sessions may be videotaped for teaching purposes. Grades will be based on the quality of participation and written assignments. A course pack with readings will be available and additional materials will be distributed by the instructor and teaching assistants during the course. (Hatcher)

Section 102 CHILDREN IN MINORITY FAMILIES. The focal point of this course will be a 1 1/2 day conference featuring experts in policy and research related to minority families and their children. Students will prepare for attendance at the conference through advance readings and discussion designed to provide background on the status of different types of minority families. Readings will include primary sources of representative minor writers. The pre-conference class sessions will address the demographic, social and psychological context surrounding minority families. Post-conference sessions will be devoted to summarizing and integrating material from the event. Evaluation will rest on participation and a paper connecting aspects of the preparation to conference content and documenting the student's enhanced knowledge about minority family issues. (Thomas)

444. Perception. Psych. 170, 172, 192 or 310. (NS).

This is an advanced undergraduate lecture course that focuses on basic perceptual phenomena and theories. At its most general level, human perception concerns the questions of how and why human beings conceive of, and experience immediate reality on the basis of sensory experience and information. Topics covered include: Psychophysics, sensory transduction, Gestalt organization, constancy and contrast effects, expectation, selective attention, perceptual learning, and symbolic representation. While the course has a natural science orientation, social, humanistic, philosophical and esthetic perspectives are also considered. The instructor assumes some sophistication on the part of the students, however, no particular knowledge base is assumed. Grades will be based entirely on writing assignments. Four short papers (five pages) and one longer paper (ten pages) will be required. There will be no exams. The course grade will be the average of the grades on the papers, with the longer paper receiving twice the weight of a short paper. (Pachella)

457. Child Psychology. Introductory psychology. (SS).

This course is a survey course in child development from birth to adolescence. Physical growth, cognitive development, language development and social and personality development are examined. Students are expected to read approximately 100 pages per week and to attend lectures and weekly discussion groups. Grades are based on a midterm exam, a final exam, and a short paper. (Rosengren)

475. Abnormal Psychology. Introductory psychology. (SS).
Section 101.
This course overviews abnormal psychology, emphasizing psychological explanations of such problems in living as anxiety, depression, drug abuse, and sexual dysfunction, as well as their treatment by psychological means. There are two lectures and one discussion per week. Grades are based on examination performance and activities assigned in discussion sections. Books include Rosenhan and Seligman's ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY (2nd ed.) and Kesey's ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO'S NEST. Readings may be assigned. (Peterson)

502. Special Problems in Psychology. Introductory psychology and junior standing, or permission of instructor. Only 6 credits of Psych. 400, 401, 402, 500, 501, and 502 may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology, and a maximum of 12 credits may be counted toward graduation. (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Section 102 MAXIMIZING THE POTENTIAL OF PERSONS WITH LEARNING DISABILITIES. The proposed course will take advantage of the fact that I am hosting a conference on our campus June 1-3, 1989. It is being held at the invitation of the International Academy for Research on Learning Disabilities and is being co-hosted by the University of Michigan and Pennsylvania State University. The title of this conference is CHILDREN, ADOLESCENTS and ADULTS: MAXIMIZING POTENTIAL. Thus, unlike many recent conferences on children and adolescents with learning disabilities that emphasized deficits or defects, the emphasis will be on approaches to remediation, intervention and the strengths the students typically exhibit. Also, the inclusion of research on young adults is an unusual feature. It is only recently that sufficient data and writings have been available on learning disabilities in young adults to include this topic in a conference. The invited speakers represent some of the best researchers and practitioners working in the field. The two symposia promise to be exceptionally good and are on timely topics: learning disabilities in college students, and computer technology in working with learning disabilities. Further, there will be numerous sessions based on the submissions and conversation hours with well-known investigators. There will be two sessions held in May, one early in the term and the other near the beginning of the conference. A final session will be held in early June, one week after the conference. (Hagen)

503. Special Problems in Psychology: Advanced Laboratory. Introductory psychology. (Excl).

Section 101 ADVANCED LABORATORY IN JUDGMENT AND DECISION MAKING. This course initiates the student to the process of creating new knowledge about judgment and decision making, and in the behavioral sciences in general. Essentially, class members are co-investigators on research projects that address two original problems of current interest in the field. The problems examined differ from one term to the next. An illustrative problem is understanding the foundations of people's typical overconfidence in their answers to factual questions, e.g., "Which is farther north, New York or London?" Each student participates fully in all phases of the research process, from the conceptual analysis of the given problem and review of the pertinent literature, through the collection and analysis of data, and the interpretation and reporting of results. Classes consist mainly of intensive discussions of relevant articles and of design and interpretation issues. Grades are based on students' reviews of articles, their contributions to the execution of various aspects of the class projects, their written reports, and their participation in discussions. It is helpful, though not essential, if the student has had a previous course that discussed behavioral decision making, e.g., Psychology 522. This course satisfies one of the advanced laboratory requirements for a concentration in psychology. (Yates)

504. Individual Research. Permission of instructor. A combined total of 6 credits of Psych. 300-309, 504, and 506 may be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for a total of 6 credits.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake individual research under the direction of a member of the staff. The work of the course must include the collection and analysis of data and a written report. Students are provided with the proper section number by the staff member with whom the work has been arranged. Students are responsible for being properly registered for this course, which includes a contract signed by the instructor, and approval of the Committee on Undergraduate Studies contracts are available from the Undergraduate Psychology Office K106, 580 Union Drive, and must be returned there for approval.

506. Tutorial Reading. Permission of instructor and a prior or concurrent course in an area related to the one in which tutorial reading is to be done. A combined total of 6 credits of Psych. 300-309, 504, and 506 may be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for a total of 6 credits.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake individual plans of study under the direction of a member of the staff. Students are provided with the proper section number by the staff member with whom the work has been arranged. Students are responsible for properly registering for this course, which includes a contract signed by the instructor and student, and approval of the Committee on Undergraduate Studies contracts are available from the Undergraduate Psychology Office, K106, 580 Union Drive, and must be returned there for approval.


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