Courses in History (Division 390)

100-Level Courses are Survey Courses and Introductory Courses for Freshmen and Sophomores

160. United States to 1865. (SS).

The course will introduce students to some of the key problems in American history from the earliest years of settlement through the Civil War. Rather than providing a complete narrative of events from 1607 to 1865, we will explore in some depth certain major issues which confronted early Americans: the problem of forming communities under the varied social, demographic, and economic conditions; the problem of labor in the colonies and the shift from servitude to slavery in the South; the phenomenon of witchcraft as a breakdown of gender and social causes of the revolution; the transition from the republicanism to democracy; the role of women in religious and reform movements; and the experience of Afro-American slaves and the unfolding of sectional tensions around the debate over slavery. We will pay close attention to how economic, social, and political developments affected different groups in American society Blacks, women, servants, workers, farmers. The required reading will average 200 pages per week, and students will be expected to complete one short paper and a final exam. (Juster)

300-Level Courses and Above are for Juniors and Seniors

316. History of Eighteenth-Century Europe. (SS).

The course is designed to cover the period and area, and to introduce problems of comparison of states' developments. The varying interactions with society of five or six states (at least France, England, Prussia, Russia, Poland) will be studied through lectures and reading. In particular, the aim is to understand why, in what has been called the age of the democratic revolution, that revolution took root in France rather than elsewhere. Students will read first in general works treating the eighteenth century, and then in more detail in the histories of France and two other countries that they will choose for purposes of making comparisons. (Bien)

388. Socialism and Nationalism. (HU).

Lectures, readings and discussions on Socialism and Nationalism as competing conceptions of history, society and politics, and on their interaction and impact from the early 19th century to the present. Socialist and nationalist ideologies and movements will be examined against the background of general history of Europe and the changes in its economy and culture.

Szporluk, COMMUNISM AND NATIONALISM: KARL MARX VERSUS FRIEDRICH (Oxford Univ. Press, 1988), will be the basic text. There will also be reading assignments from

Talmon, ROMANTICISM AND REVOLT, 1815-1848;, COMMUNISM, FASCISM AND DEMOCRACY;, TO THE FINLAND STATION;, MARXISM AFTER MARX; , NATIONS AND STATES;, NATIONALISM IN THE 20th CENTURY;, AGAINST THE CURRENT; and d'Encausse, DECLINE OF THE EMPIRE. For general historical background and context, consult

Rich, THE AGE OF NATIONALISM AND REFORM, 1850-1890, and, THE END OF THE EUROPEAN ERA, 1890 TO THE PRESENT.

All these books will be on reserve but some of them are important enough to be purchased. There will be one midterm examination in class. For the final there will be a choice: EITHER a take-home exam OR one paper (12-15 pages). (Szporluk)

517. History of Ireland Since 1603. (HU).

A narrative history of modern Ireland from the time of the collapse of Gaelic culture at the Tudor conquest until the present. Lectures will treat aspects of cultural and social as well as political history. The main texts will be Moody and Martin, THE COURSE OF IRISH HISTORY, and J.C. Beckett's THE MAKING OF MODERN IRELAND. Course work will include two hour exams, one term paper, a final examination. There is no course prerequisite and no prior knowledge of Ireland is required. (McNamara)


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