Courses in Psychology (Division 455)

170. Introduction to Psychology as a Natural Science. Credit is granted for both Psych. 170 and 171; no credit granted to those who have completed 172, 190 or 192. Psych. 170 may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (NS). Students in Psychology 170 are required to spend four hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects.

This course presents material about biological and cognitive areas of psychology. It does NOT emphasize psychotherapy and mental illness, which are included in Psychology 171. It DOES cover topics such as perception, memory, animal behavior, and the human brain as a biological system. The course meets four hours per week. Sections are taught by graduate teaching fellows who have responsibility for their own sections.

171. Introduction to Psychology as a Social Science. Credit is granted for both Psych. 170 and 171; no credit granted to those who have completed 172 or 192. Psych. 171 may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (SS). Students in Psychology 171 are required to spend four hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects.

This course typically covers such topics as child development, interpersonal relations, social psychology, psychopathology, treatment approaches, learning, memory, motivation, emotion, personality and others. Each section differs somewhat in content, instructional methods, and evaluation. Students originally register for a Time Slot ONLY (sections 001-009). Students should check the Final Edition of the TIME SCHEDULE for day/time/place of the MANDATORY meeting for their time slot section (001-009). At this meeting, students will be given a chance to read course descriptions of instructors in their Time Slot, instructors will be available to answer questions regarding their individual section(s), and students will then complete a "Choice Form" rank ordering their choice(s) of instructor. Final Class Role Sheets will be posted at the Psychology 171 office. If a student is unable to attend either the first meeting of his/her registered section (001-009) or the Wait List meeting, he or she MUST CALL THE OFFICE (764-9179) PRIOR TO THE MEETING TO RETAIN THEIR SPACE IN THE COURSE OR ON THE WAIT LIST. Wait List (section 099) students MUST attend the Wait List meeting listed in the Time Schedule to be placed in an open section. Syllabi will be posted at the Psychology 171 office prior to registration and TAs will set up open office hours at which time students can stop in the office and get additional information regarding the section of their choice. For further information regarding open office hours, call the Psych. 171 office - 764-9179.

172. Introduction to Psychology. Psych. 172 is equivalent to either Psych. 170 or 171 as a prerequisite for advanced courses in the department and as a prerequisite to concentration. No credit granted to those who have completed 170, 171, 190 or 192. Psych. 172 may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (SS). Students in Psychology 172 are required to spend four hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects.

This course is a one-term survey which integrates material from Psychology 170 and 171. The course serves as a basic preparation for most advanced level courses in psychology. The aim of the course is to acquaint students with the major approaches psychologists use to understand people and the aspects of human thought, feeling, and action that psychologists have studied. Lectures and readings first present the major ways of thinking about psychological issues (psychodynamic, cognitive-behavioral, and biological) and then address the nature of thought, emotion, development from infancy through death, and interactions of individuals with family, social, and cultural forces. Discussion sections offer students the opportunity to discuss and critically examine what they are learning, to analyze case studies, and to participate in more experiential forms of learning.

204. Individual Research. Introductory psychology and permission of instructor. May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for a total of 6 credits.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake individual research under the direction of a member of the staff. Students are provided with the proper section number by the staff member with whom the work has been arranged. Students are responsible for properly registering for this course.

206. Tutorial Reading. Introductory psychology and permission of instructor. May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for a total of 6 credits.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake individual plans of study under the direction of a member of the staff. Students are provided with the proper section number by the staff member with whom the work has been arranged. Students are responsible for properly registering for this course.

300. Field Practicum. Introductory psychology and permission of a departmental Board of Study. Degree credit is granted for a combined total of 15 credits elected through Psych. 201 and 300-309. A combined total of 6 credits of Psychology 300-309, 504, and 506 may be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). Credit is granted for a combined total of 12 credits elected through the series Psych. 300-309.

This general description covers Psychology 300-309.

The field practicum course offers students an opportunity to integrate experiential and academic work within the context of a field setting. Students work in various community agencies and organizations; meet regularly with a faculty sponsor to discuss their experiences; read materials which are relevant to their experiences; and create some form of written product that draws experiences together at the end of the term. Obtain materials as early as possible as it generally takes students some time to meet requirements necessary to register for the course. N.B. This course is an Experiential course and no more than 30 credits may be counted toward the 120 hours required for graduation.

308. Field Practicum. Introductory psychology and permission of a departmental Board of Study. Degree credit is granted for a combined total of 15 credits elected through Psych. 201 and 300-309. A combined total of 6 credits of Psychology 300-309, 504, and 506 may be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). Credit is granted for a combined total of 12 credits elected through the series Psych. 300-309.

Section 201 WORKING WITH CHILDREN. Directed experience with children aged 18 months 5 years at the University of Michigan Children's Center and Children's Center for Working Families for approximately 6-10 hrs/week on a regular basis. Seminar relating theoretical issues to applied practice is held every two weeks. No prerequisites required. Course is intended to introduce students to children in a naturalistic setting. (Sternberg)

382. Introduction to Social Psychology. Introductory psychology. (SS).
Section 201.
This course introduces students to the field of social psychology by covering such basic theoretical concepts as social beliefs and social interference; conformity and power; altruism; aggression; interpersonal attraction; and persuasion. Material from each unit is applied to a variety of contemporary social and psychological concerns. (Oyserman)

501. Special Problems in Psychology, Social Science. Introductory psychology and junior standing, or permission of instructor. Only 6 credits of Psych. 400, 401, 402, 500, 501, and 502 may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology, and a maximum of 12 credits may be counted toward graduation. (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Section 201 PREJUDICE, SOCIAL IDENTITY, AND INTERGROUP CONFLICT. This course explores the contributions of social psychological research to enhance our understanding of issues evolving around members of minority groups, defined here to include women, ethnic, racial and social minorities. In the introductory section of this course we will discuss definitions of important concepts, examine the development of research on this topic over time, and the methods used to study these issues. Section 2 presents basic research that has studied this question. This research can be categorized into three parts. Part 2 discusses how being in a minority position influences our social identity. In Part 3, the interaction between members of minority groups and majority groups is analyzed. In the third section of this course, two concrete issues, namely gender differences in academic achievement and the effects of desegregation of schools are studied. The literature used will be available in a course pack. The final grade will be based on one individual term paper (40%), one midterm (30%) plus the grade in the final exam (30%). (Inglehart)

504. Individual Research. Permission of instructor. A combined total of 6 credits of Psych. 300-309, 504, and 506 may be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for a total of 6 credits.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake individual research under the direction of a member of the staff. The work of the course must include the collection and analysis of data and a written report. Students are provided with the proper section number by the staff member with whom the work has been arranged. Students are responsible for being properly registered for this course, which includes a contract signed by the instructor, and approval of the Committee on Undergraduate Studies contracts are available from the Undergraduate Psychology Office K106, 580 Union Drive, and must be returned there for approval.

506. Tutorial Reading. Permission of instructor and a prior or concurrent course in an area related to the one in which tutorial reading is to be done. A combined total of 6 credits of Psych. 300-309, 504, and 506 may be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for a total of 6 credits.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake individual plans of study under the direction of a member of the staff. Students are provided with the proper section number by the staff member with whom the work has been arranged. Students are responsible for properly registering for this course, which includes a contract signed by the instructor and student, and approval of the Committee on Undergraduate Studies contracts are available from the Undergraduate Psychology Office, K106, 580 Union Drive, and must be returned there for approval.

558. Psychology of Adolescence. Psych. 453 or 457; or permission of instructor. (Excl).
Section 201.
Designed to educate the student about (1) the application of scientific inquiry to the domain of human behavior and development; (2) some principles of developmental and social psychology; and (3) the specific effects on human behavior of ADOLESCENCE, a period of rapid biological, psychological and social change. Intended as a contribution to students' liberal education; to provide them with concepts which may enrich their appreciation of a broad range of scientific and cultural materials; and to help them lead more self-conscious lives. Approach to adolescence is bio-social. Adolescence will be treated as a particular instance of interaction between sociological, psychological and social development, centering about the attainment of adult sexuality, increasing cognitive skills, and preparation for taking adult roles in the individual's society. Students must already have successfully completed at least one course in child or lifespan development or in the socialization of the child. Evaluation will be based on written work; take-home essay examinations and a term paper. Reading will include a textbook, a course pack of theoretical and empirical papers on adolescence. One lecture (or film) and one discussion section per week. (Gold)


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