Courses in Chemistry (Division 334)

109. 2.5 General Chemistry. Chem. 108. (3). (NS).

Chemistry 109 is the third part of three course sequence (107, 108, 109); Chemistry 107 is offered during Fall term only, and Chemistry 108 during Winter term only, and Chemistry 109 is offered during both Spring (IIIa) and Fall terms. The sequence is equivalent to Chemistry 123, 126, 125. Students in Chemistry 109 enroll in a Chemistry 125 laboratory section, and in addition to completing the laboratory course requirements (refer to Chemistry 125 for a description), write a term paper. The laboratory grade makes up 80% of the term grade in Chemistry 109, and the assigned paper the remaining 20%. [Cost:2] [WL:2]

123. General and Inorganic Chemistry: Structure of Matter. Three years of high school mathematics or mathematics through 105. (3). (NS).

Chemistry 123 is the first term chemistry course in the (123 or 124)/125/126 sequence. Chemistry 125 and 126 are taken second term. Chemistry 123 consists of three lectures and a help session with the professor, and one discussion session with a teaching assistant per week. Topics covered include stoichiometry, periodic properties, gases, solution equilibria, acids and bases, quantum theory, and electronic structure of atoms and molecules. There are three one-hour examinations and a final examination. Refer to the Time Schedule for examination dates and times. [Cost:3] [WL:2]

125. General and Inorganic Chemistry: Laboratory. To be elected by students who have completed Chem. 123 or are eligible for (or enrolled in) Chem. 124. (2). (NS).

This course is part of the (123 or 124)/125/126 sequence and is intended to be elected with Chemistry 124 (in the 124/126 sequence) or with Chemistry 126 (in the 123/126 sequence). The format consists of two lectures and two four-hour laboratories each week. Computer simulations implemented on microcomputers are used to supplement the experiments. Part of the last hour of the laboratory period is used to discuss the laboratory work just completed. Special emphasis is placed on quantitative measurements, inferences from experimental observations, and development and application of concepts related to chemical reactions. Oxidation-reduction, acid-base, and ionic reactions will be examined including energy changes and reaction equilibria. The student will apply laboratory skills and the concepts developed from studies of chemical reactions to analysis and synthesis. There are two one-hour examinations. Refer to the Time Schedule for examination dates and times. [Cost:2] [WL:2]

126. General and Inorganic Chemistry: Chemical Dynamics. Chem. 123 or 124; prior or concurrent enrollment in Chem. 125. (3). (NS).

This course is a continuation of Chemistry 123 or 124 and should be preceded or accompanied by Chemistry 125. The course has three lectures and one discussion per week. Topics include covalent bonding, liquids and solids, thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, equilibria, electrochemistry, coordination chemistry, nuclear chemistry, and an introduction to organic chemistry. There are three one-hour examinations and a final examination. Refer to the Time Schedule for examination dates and times. [Cost:1, optional exam packs and possibly some duplicated materials needed)] [WL:2]

225. Organic Chemistry. Chem. 126 or 197 or 348. (4). (NS).

This course is the first of a two-term lecture sequence in the basic principles of organic chemistry. It is elected by pre-professional students and by chemistry concentrators. Chemistry 225/226 require skill in spatial relations, the ability to organize information carefully and the ability to recognize important concepts. Chemistry 225, which establishes the conceptual framework upon which Chemistry 226 is based, describes the relationship between structure, energy and chemical reactivity. There are three two-hour lectures and two one-hour discussions each week. The course grade is determined by a students' scores on three one-hour examinations, quiz grades, and a final examination. [Cost:3] [WL:2]

226. Organic Chemistry. Chem. 225; and concurrent enrollment in Chem. 227. (3). (NS).

This course is a continuation of Chemistry 225 and emphasizes functional group chemistry and synthesis. Some attention is given to biological systems and to the chemistry of natural products, especially the chemistry of carbohydrates and proteins. The course format is three two-hour lectures each week, and the final grade is based on three one-hour examinations and a final examination. [Cost:1] [WL:2]

227. Organic Chemistry Laboratory. Chem. 225. (2). (NS).

This course is a one term introduction to organic laboratory techniques and enables students to experience organic chemistry as a real science. Chemistry 227 is usually elected concurrently with Chemistry 226 and reinforces concepts developed in Chemistry 225/226 lectures. Wet chemical methods are emphasized, but there is some opportunity to identify organic materials or components of mixtures with the help of spectroscopic information. The course grade is based upon laboratory work and written examinations. [Cost:4] [WL:2]

319. Independent Study. Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for a total of 4 credits.

Research in an area of interest to, and supervised by, a Departmental faculty member. The Chemistry Department encourages students to get involved with undergraduate research as early as possible. The Counseling Office, 2035 Chemistry Building, provides information and help to students in meeting with faculty members to discuss research opportunities. Exact details such as nature of the research, level of involvement of the student, credit hours awarded and criteria for grading are individually determined in consultation with the faculty member. The student is expected to put in at least three hours a week of actual work for a 14-week term for each credit hour elected. At the end of each term, three copies of a written report are submitted, one for the Counseling Office, one for the student, and one for the faculty supervisor.

For a student to receive Chemistry credit for Chemistry 319, the student must work on a research project supervised by a faculty member of the Chemistry Department, either alone, or in collaboration with a colleague within the department, from another department, or from another school. This collaboration must be an ongoing one, and the student must receive direct supervision by all of the faculty who have agreed to sponsor the project. Final evaluation of the research effort and the report, as well as the grade for the course, rests with the faculty member from the Chemistry Department. [Cost:1] [WL:3]

399. Honors Introduction to Research. Permission of a chemistry concentration adviser and the professor who will supervise the research. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for a total of 4 credits during junior or senior year.

Usually elected starting in the junior or the senior year, this course is a requirement for Honors Chemistry students who must elect it for a total of four credits spread out over two or more terms. Non-Honors students are also encouraged to elect the course for a total of up to four credits. The student is expected to put in at least three hours a week of actual work for each credit hour elected. At the end of each term, a written report evaluating the progress of the project is submitted; one copy to the faculty member, one copy for the Counseling Office and one copy for the student. Interim reports need not be lengthy, but the final report for Chemistry 399 is expected to be more detailed and longer than the reports in 319, and for the Honors student, will be the Honors thesis.

For a student to receive Chemistry credit for Chemistry 399, the student must work on a research project supervised by a faculty member of the Chemistry Department, either alone, or in collaboration with a colleague within the department, from another department, or from another school. This collaboration must be an ongoing one, and the student must receive direct supervision by all of the faculty who have agreed to sponsor the project. Final evaluation of the research effort and the report, as well as the grade for the course, rests with the faculty member from the Chemistry Department.

468. Physical Chemistry. Phys. 240 and 241, Math. 216, and prior enrollment in three terms of chemistry. (4). (Excl).

This is the first of two-term lecture sequence in Physical Chemistry (followed by Chemistry 469). The course is normally elected by students in Chemistry, Chemical Engineering, Cellular and Molecular Biology and others requiring a rigorous treatment of Physical Chemistry. Topics covered in Chemistry 468: theory of gases; the laws of thermodynamics with applications to chemical and phase equilibria, solutions and electrochemical cells; introduction to statistical mechanics. [Cost:3] [WL:2]

469. Physical Chemistry. Phys. 240 and 241, Math. 216, and prior enrollment in three terms of chemistry. (4). (Excl).

This course is the second of the regular two-term sequence in physical chemistry (Chemistry 468 and 469). The topics include quantum chemistry, molecular structure, spectroscopy and chemical kinetics. [Cost:3] [WL:2]


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