Courses in Psychology (Division 455)

The Department of Psychology offers three regular introductory courses which differ in focus: Psychology 170, Psychology 171, and Psychology 172. Psychology 170 is offered as a natural science and stresses experimental psychology; Psychology 171 is offered as a social science and stresses social psychology and interpersonal behavior; Psychology 172 is approved for social science distribution but treats both perspectives with about equal weight. Students may elect Psychology 170 and 171, but students may not receive credit for Psychology 172 and either Psychology 170 or 171. Any of the three courses meets the prerequisite requirement for concentration and serves as a prerequisite for advanced courses.

170. Introduction to Psychology as a Natural Science. Credit is granted for both Psych. 170 and 171; no credit granted to those who have completed 172, 190 or 192. Psych. 170 may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (4). (NS). Students in Psychology 170 are required to spend five hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects.

This course presents material about biological and cognitive areas of psychology. It does NOT emphasize psychotherapy and mental illness, which are included in Psychology 171. It DOES cover topics such as perception, memory, animal behavior, and the human brain as a biological system. The course meets four hours per week. Sections are taught by graduate teaching fellows who have responsibility for their own sections. [WL:1]

171. Introduction to Psychology as a Social Science. Credit is granted for both Psych. 170 and 171; no credit granted to those who have completed 172 or 192. Psych. 171 may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (4). (SS). Students in Psychology 171 are required to spend five hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects.

This course typically covers such topics as child development, interpersonal relations, social psychology, psychopathology, treatment approaches, learning, memory, personality, and others. If a student is unable to attend the first class for which they are registered, they must notify the Introductory Psychology Office in writing prior to the first day of class. [Cost:2] [WL:1]

172. Introduction to Psychology. Psych. 172 is equivalent to either Psych. 170 or 171 as a prerequisite for advanced courses in the department and as a prerequisite to concentration. No credit granted to those who have completed 170, 171, 190 or 192. Psych. 172 may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (4). (SS). Students in Psychology 172 are required to spend five hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects.

This course is a one-term survey which integrates material from Psychology 170 and 171. The course serves as a basic preparation for most advanced level courses in psychology. The aim of the course is to acquaint students with the major approaches psychologists use to understand people and the aspects of human thought, feeling, and action that psychologists have studied. Lectures and readings first present the major ways of thinking about psychological issues (psychodynamic, cognitive-behavioral, and biological) and then address the nature of thought, emotion, development from infancy through death, and interactions of individuals with family, social, and cultural forces. Discussion sections offer students the opportunity to discuss and critically examine what they are learning, to analyze case studies, and to participate in more experiential forms of learning. [Cost:2] [WL:1]

204. Individual Research. Introductory psychology and permission of instructor. May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for a total of 6 credits.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake individual research under the direction of a member of the staff. Students are provided with the proper section number by the staff member with whom the work has been arranged. Students are responsible for properly registering for this course. [WL:5, P.I. only]

206. Tutorial Reading. Introductory psychology and permission of instructor. May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for a total of 6 credits.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake individual plans of study under the direction of a member of the staff. Students are provided with the proper section number by the staff member with whom the work has been arranged. Students are responsible for properly registering for this course. [WL:5, P.I. only]

300. Field Practicum. Introductory psychology and permission of instructor. Degree credit is granted for a combined total of 15 credits elected through Psych. 201 and 300-309. A combined total of 6 credits of Psychology 300-309, 504, and 506 may be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (1-12). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). Credit is granted for a combined total of 12 credits elected through the series Psych. 300-309.

This general description covers Psychology 300-309.

The field practicum course offers students an opportunity to integrate experiential and academic work within the context of a field setting. Students work in various community agencies and organizations; meet regularly with a faculty sponsor to discuss their experiences; read materials which are relevant to their experiences; and create some form of written product that draws experiences together at the end of the term. Obtain materials as early as possible as it generally takes students some time to meet requirements necessary to register for the course. N.B. This course is an Experiential course and no more than 30 credits may be counted toward the 120 hours required for graduation. [WL:5, P.I. only]

308. Field Practicum. Introductory psychology and permission of a departmental Board of Study. Degree credit is granted for a combined total of 15 credits elected through Psych. 201 and 300-309. A combined total of 6 credits of Psychology 300-309, 504, and 506 may be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (1-12). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). Credit is granted for a combined total of 12 credits elected through the series Psych. 300-309.

SECTION 001: WORKING WITH CHILDREN. Directed experience with children aged 18 months 5 years at the University's Children Center and Children's Center for Working Families for approximately 6-10 hours/week on a regular basis. Seminar relating theoretical issues to applied practice is held every two weeks. No prerequisites required. Course is intended to introduce students to children in a child care setting (Sternberg)

310. Superlab in Psychology as a Natural Science. Introductory Psychology or a strong background in the natural sciences. (3). (NS).

This course fulfills one of the advanced laboratory requirements in Psychology and may be counted toward either a B.A. or B.S. degree. It is designed to acquaint psychology concentrators with a wide range of methods and topics applicable to the scientific study of behavior. Topics of study include vision and perception, neural information processing, pattern recognition, memory systems, language, problem solving, and decision making. Particular emphasis is placed upon experimental methods and design, data analysis and statistical inferences. Student evaluation is based upon laboratory reports and participation, two exams, and one term paper. The course is also appropriate for students in various other degree programs related to the scientific study of psychology. [Cost:2] [WL:1]

362. Teaching or Supervising Laboratory or Fieldwork in Psychology. Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be elected for credit more than once.

Open to departmental undergraduate Teaching Assistants. Provides an opportunity to take part in the instructional process in areas in which the student has demonstrated prerequisite knowledge and skills. Under staff supervision, students teach and supervise other students in discussions, labs and field work. Students are provided with the proper section number by the staff member with whom the work has been arranged. MAY NOT BE ELECTED FOR CREDIT MORE THAN ONCE. [WL:5, P.I. only]

382. Introduction to Social Psychology. Introductory psychology. (4). (SS).

This course introduces students to current and classical theory and research in social psychology. The overall focus is on ways in which individual thought and action are shaped by our social nature. Among the subjects to be examined are attitudes and social cognition, roles and norms, conformity, persuasion, group influence, altruism, aggression, prejudice, interpersonal attraction, and conflict resolution. In addition to reading the textbook SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (Meyers, 1987) and JULY'S PEOPLE, a novel by South African Nadine Gordimer, students will read works from outside social psychology whose topics correspond to the topics addressed in the textbook. Instructional formats include lectures, readings, writing, films, group demonstrations, and group discussion. Grades are based on weekly objective tests, three papers, and an objective, comprehensive final exam. [Cost:3] [WL:1] (Landman)

385. Marriage and the Family. Introductory psychology. (3). (SS).

Section 101 This course will examine the clinical and research literature concerning the contemporary family. We will begin with the history of marriage as a cultural institution and trace the development of the modern family. The course will also focus on alternatives to marriage and the nontraditional family (e.g., divorce, single parent families, remarriage families, families headed by gay partners, etc.). Students will be expected to attend weekly lectures and will be evaluated on the basis of examinations and assignments. [Cost:2] [WL:4] (Leary)

401. Special Problems in Psychology as a Social Science. Introductory psychology; intended for freshmen and sophomores. Only 6 credits of Psych. 400, 401, 402 and 500, 501, 502 combined may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology, and a maximum of 12 credits may be counted toward graduation. (1-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Section 101 PEER COUNSELING SKILLS. This new course, which is open to freshmen through seniors, is designed to explore the basic principles, techniques and developmental issues involved in peer counseling. The class size will be limited to 20 in this two credit mini-course so as to encourage discussion and participation in role play exercises. Appropriate readings and class discussion will address such issues as confidentiality, empathy, listening and communication skills. While there will be no examinations, there will be weekly essay questions and a longer final paper. These written assignments and in-class exercises will give an opportunity to apply the theory and technique of peer counseling. Some of the readings and discussion will focus on issues of self understanding in adolescence and adulthood, and on research issues in the field. While there are not required prerequisites for this class, it would be helpful for students to be curious about peer counseling and have a capacity for empathy and self understanding. High school volunteers may participate in some of the role play situations so that college students can practice some of their counseling skills. Some of the class sessions may be videotaped for teaching purposes. Grades will be based on the quality of participation and written assignments. A course pack with readings will be available and additional materials will be distributed by the instructor and teaching assistants during the course. [Cost:2] [WL:1] (Hatcher)

444. Perception. Psych. 170, 172, 192 or 310. (3). (NS).

This is an advanced undergraduate course that focuses on basic perceptual phenomena and theories. At its most general level, human perception concerns the questions of how and why human beings conceive of, and experience immediate reality on the basis of sensory information. Topics covered include: Psychophysics, sensory transduction, Gestalt organization, constancy and contrast effects, expectation, selective attention, perceptual learning and symbolic representation. While the course is oriented toward the natural sciences, it also considers social, philosophical and esthetic perspectives. The instructor assumes some sophistication on the part of the students, however, no particular background is necessary. Thus, students with little specific knowledge of psychology are welcome. Grades will be determined on the basis of three short papers (each worth 20% of the grade) and one longer paper (worth 40% of the grade). The instructor also anticipates the development of a conference for the course on the MTS system. Questions concerning this class can be messaged to Robert Pachella using the MTS-UB message system. [Cost:1] [WL:5 Get on waitlist. At beginning of term be sure telephone number at CRISP is correct: If not call 764-1590 to give correct telephone number. As places in the course open up, we will call people IN ORDER from the waitlist.] (Pachella)

453. Socialization of the Child. Introductory psychology. (3). (SS).

This course will cover the influences that affect the child's socio-emotional development. It will cover the theories of social development and the research findings. We will examine the role of the family, peers, school are the larger society as they affect personality, self-concepts, competence, attitudes and behavior. There will be two exams and a term project. [Cost:1-2] [WL:1-2] (Hoffman)

457. Child Psychology. Introductory psychology. (3). (SS).
Section 101.
This course is a survey course in child development from birth to adolescence. Physical growth, cognitive development, language development and social and personality development are examined. Students are expected to read approximately 100 pages per week and to attend lectures and weekly discussion groups. Grades are based on a midterm exam, a final exam, and three short papers. [Cost:2] [WL:1] (Rosengren)

Section 110. This course is a survey course in child development from birth to adolescence. Physical growth, cognitive development, language development and social and personality development are examined. Students are expected to read approximately 100 pages per week and to attend lectures and weekly discussion groups. Grades are based on a midterm exam, a final exam, and term project. [Cost:1,2] [WL:4] (Hoffman)

459. Psychology of Aging. Introductory psychology. (3). (SS).

This course covers major behavioral changes throughout adulthood, particularly in old age. Special emphasis is given to such topics as changes in biological functioning including sensation and perception, and changes in cognitive processes including intelligence, learning, memory, and in problem-solving. In addition, psychosocial aspects of adulthood are discussed. These include family roles, personality, coping mechanisms, psychopathology and treatment, and dying, death and grief. The course also considers environmental facilitation of psychological adjustments to both normal and pathological processes in old age, with special emphasis on dementia. Students do assigned readings, class exercises, projects, and take two examinations. Projects primarily include interviewing two people throughout the term and writing a research review paper. [Cost:2] [WL:1] (Weaverdyck)

464. Group Behavior in Organizations. Psych. 363 or equivalent or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

This course focuses on work group behavior in organizations. It is the second class in a series that includes Psychology 363 (Individual Behavior in Organizations) and Psychology 565 (Organization Systems). The course discusses psychological perspectives on group behavior. Topics include the formation and development of groups, their decision-making and problem-solving processes, the influence of groups on individuals, group process, and intergroup relations. The class focuses on the understanding of groups in organizations along with methods of diagnosis and intervention. Both experiential and didactic teaching methods will be used. The course material will include research literature, case studies, examples from contemporary organizations [Cost:1] [WL:1] (Rafaeli)

475. Abnormal Psychology. Introductory psychology. (3). (SS).
Section 101.
This course overviews abnormal psychology, emphasizing psychological explanations of such problems in living as anxiety, depression, drug abuse, and sexual dysfunction, as well as their treatment by psychological means. There are two lectures and one discussion per week. Grades are based on examination performance and activities assigned in discussion sections. Books include Rosenhan and Seligman's ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY (2nd ed.) Readings may be assigned. [Cost:2] [WL:1] (Peterson)

504. Individual Research. Permission of instructor. A combined total of 6 credits of Psych. 300-309, 504, and 506 may be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for a total of 6 credits.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake individual research under the direction of a member of the staff. The work of the course must include the collection and analysis of data and a written report. Students are provided with the proper section number by the staff member with whom the work has been arranged. Students are responsible for being properly registered for this course, which includes a contract signed by the instructor, and approval of the Committee on Undergraduate Studies contracts are available from the Undergraduate Psychology Office K106, 580 Union Drive, and must be returned there for approval. [WL:5, P.I. only]

506. Tutorial Reading. Permission of instructor and a prior or concurrent course in an area related to the one in which tutorial reading is to be done. A combined total of 6 credits of Psych. 300-309, 504, and 506 may be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for a total of 6 credits.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake individual plans of study under the direction of a member of the staff. Students are provided with the proper section number by the staff member with whom the work has been arranged. Students are responsible for properly registering for this course, which includes a contract signed by the instructor and student, and approval of the Committee on Undergraduate Studies contracts are available from the Undergraduate Psychology Office, K106, 580 Union Drive, and must be returned there for approval. [WL:5, P.I. only]


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