SLAVIC LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

Courses in Russian (Division 466)

Language

202. Second-Year Russian, Continued. Russian 201 or equivalent. No credit granted to those who have completed 111, 112, or 203. (4). (FL).

This course assumes students' knowledge of the fundamentals of Russian grammar, and involves a comprehensive study of the declension of numbers, the use of verbs of motion (with and without spatial prefixes), the formation and usage of participles and gerunds. Students read and write texts of increasing complexity, discussing Russian and Soviet history, culture and other topics of interest. The course is conducted in Russian and requires 8-12 hours of homework per week. [Cost:3] [WL:4]

203. Second-Year Intensive Russian. Russian 102 or 103 or equivalent. No credit granted to those who have completed 201 or 202. (10). (FL).

An intensive course meeting twenty hours a week, this course covers the material which is usually covered in two terms in 201 and 202. Special emphasis is placed on speaking, comprehension, and vocabulary building. The course is conducted in Russian and is especially recommended for students who intend to concentrate in Russian Language and Literature or in Russian and East European Studies. Students should expect approximately 50 hours of homework per week (including language lab assignments). Texts: MAKING PROGRESS IN RUSSIAN, Davis & Opprendek; WORKBOOK TO DAVIS & OPPRENDEK; Course pack of supplementary materials available at Kinko's Copies on East Liberty; GETTING AROUND TOWN: SITUATIONAL DIALOGUES IN RUSSIAN, Slava Paperno. Students entering 203 should already have been introduced to the entire Russian grammar (especially to all the case endings, singular and plural) and should have completed one of the standard first year textbooks, such as RUSSIAN, RUSSIAN FOR EVERYBODY, BEGINNING RUSSIAN, or RUSSIAN STAGE ONE. Students who have not completed such a textbook in their first year course are best advised to take Russian 102 in the Spring term before beginning the second year course in Summer term.

303. Third-Year Intensive Russian. Russian 203 or equivalent. No credit granted to those who have completed 301 or 302. (8). (Excl).

Third Year Intensive Russian begins with the assumption that the basic aspects of the language have been assimilated, and therefore emphasizes the practical skills reading, writing, and speaking. Difficult grammatical points are reviewed, vocabulary is greatly enlarged, idiomatic constructions are studied, work on modern conversational Russian. It is a recitation course and students are asked to participate in class discussions. Students are also expected to make intensive use of the language lab after class. The class meets 20 hours per week and students are expected to complete 25-30 hours of homework per week. Students are evaluated on the basis of class participation, translations, compositions written at home and an oral interview conducted by the end of the term. Texts: CONTINUING WITH RUSSIAN, Townsend; (course pack) reading in Russian culture and literature; RUSSIAN ROOT LIST and WORKBOOK, Gribble and Browning; BOOK OF RUSSIAN IDIOMS ILLUSTRATED, Dubrovin.

355. Supervised Reading of Russian Literature. Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for credit twice.

Students develop a term-long reading and writing project on a topic or topics in Russian literary or linguistic studies, in consultation with a member of the faculty. Readings usually include substantial amounts of Russian. Weekly meetings with the supervisor may be conducted in English or Russian. Writing assignments made according to the number of credit hours elected, but must correspond to the writing expectations of upper-level department courses. [WL:5, Permission of instructor required) (Makin)

403. Fourth-Year Intensive Russian. Russian 302 or equivalent. No credit granted to those who have completed 401 or 402. (8). (Excl).

The emphasis of this course is on proficiency in speaking, writing, and reading. The class is conducted entirely in Russian. Students are taught how to use their skills in order to read large amounts of material in Russian. Class discussions will be held 3 times per week in order to advance students' oral abilities. Some work will also be done in the area of Russian syntax. Students intensively read contemporary prose of various Russian authors, write compositions on given topics and present oral reports. The class meets 20 hours per week and students are expected to complete 25-30 hours of homework per week. Progress is gauged by quizzes and a final examination. Texts: VERBS OF MOTION IN RUSSIAN, Muravuova; (course pack) readings in Russian culture and literature.

Literature

492. Senior Honors Course. Approval of departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). 491 and 492 may be elected for a total of 6 credits.

During 492 (the second half of the year-long Honors course) the student produces a draft of a thesis of fifty to one hundred pages on a topic in literary or linguistic studies, and then, in consultation with a thesis supervisor and the Honors adviser, the final version of the thesis. Regular meetings with supervisor, participation in informal seminars, and successful submission of thesis lead to the award of an Honors degree in Russian. An oral defense may be required. (Makin)

Courses in Armenian (Division 474)

173/Armenian 173. Intensive First-Year Armenian. (8). (FL).

This course is designed for beginners with no previous knowledge of Armenian. Reading, writing, and speaking will all be equally emphasized. Classes will meet for four hours a day, five days a week. Language lab hours and lectures will be additional. Drills will be conducted daily and three tests will be administered each week. Students will be required to complete three hours of homework five days a week. A midterm and final examination will complete the course. K.B. Bardakjian's and R.W. Thompson's A TEXTBOOK OF MODERN WESTERN ARMENIAN will be used.

273/Armenian 273. Intensive Second-Year Armenian. Armenian 171-172 or equivalent. (8). (FL).

This course is for students who have had one year of formal instruction at college or university level or its equivalent. A placement test will be administered to evaluate applicant's knowledge of Modern Western Armenian. Equal emphasis will be placed on reading, writing, and speaking. The grammar in K.B. Bardakjian's and R.W. Thompson's A TEXTBOOK OF MODERN WESTERN ARMENIAN will be reviewed and supplemented; and selections of modern literary texts will form the main reading material. Classes will meet for four hours a day, five days a week. Language lab hours and lectures will be additional. Students will have three hours of homework a day and will write one short essay every week. Frequent tests, a midterm, and a final exam.


lsa logo

University of Michigan | College of LS&A | Student Academic Affairs | LS&A Bulletin Index

This page maintained by LS&A Academic Information and Publications, 1228 Angell Hall

The Regents of the University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA +1 734 764-1817

Trademarks of the University of Michigan may not be electronically or otherwise altered or separated from this document or used for any non-University purpose.