Courses in Psychology (Division 455)

The Department of Psychology offers three regular introductory courses which differ in focus: Psychology 170, Psychology 171, and Psychology 172. Psychology 170 is offered as a natural science and stresses experimental psychology; Psychology 171 is offered as a social science and stresses social psychology and interpersonal behavior; Psychology 172 is approved for social science distribution but treats both perspectives with about equal weight. Students may elect Psychology 170 and 171, but students may not receive credit for Psychology 172 and either Psychology 170 or 171. Any of the three courses meets the prerequisite requirement for concentration and serves as a prerequisite for advanced courses.

171. Introduction to Psychology as a Social Science. Credit is granted for both Psych. 170 and 171; no credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 172 or 192. Psych. 171 may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (4). (SS). Students in Psychology 171 are required to spend five hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects.

This course covers basic material in psychological approaches to personality and behavior, child and adolescent development, social psychology, psychopathology, psychological treatment, as well as other topics, such as memory and motivation. The basis for evaluation will be three objective exams and one or two papers, plus classwork. Forms of instruction will include lectures and discussion, classroom activities to apply psychological principles, and occasional short films or videotapes. Cost:2 WL:1 (Lakin)

172. Introduction to Psychology. Psych. 172 is equivalent to either Psych. 170 or 171 as a prerequisite for advanced courses in the department and as a prerequisite to concentration. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 170, 171, 190 or 192. Psych. 172 may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (4). (SS). Students in Psychology 172 are required to spend five hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects.

See Spring description.

204. Individual Research. Introductory psychology and permission of instructor. May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for a total of 6 credits.

See Spring Term description.

206. Tutorial Reading. Introductory psychology and permission of instructor. May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for a total of 6 credits.

See Spring Term description.

300. Field Practicum. Introductory psychology and permission of instructor. Degree credit is granted for a combined total of 15 credits elected through Psych. 201 and 300-309. A combined total of 6 credits of Psychology 300-309, 504, and 506 may be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (1-12). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). Credit is granted for a combined total of 12 credits elected through the series Psych. 300-309.

See Spring Term description.

308. Field Practicum. Introductory psychology and permission of a departmental Board of Study. Degree credit is granted for a combined total of 15 credits elected through Psych. 201 and 300-309. A combined total of 6 credits of Psychology 300-309, 504, and 506 may be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (1-12). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). Credit is granted for a combined total of 12 credits elected through the series Psych. 300-309.

WORKING WITH CHILDREN. Directed experience with children aged eighteen months to five years at the University of Michigan's Children Center and Children's Center for Working Families for approximately six to ten hours per week on a regular basis. Seminar relating theoretical issues to applied practice is held every two weeks. No prerequisites required. Course is intended to introduce students to children in a child care setting. Cost:1 WL:5, Permission of instructor required for all students (Sternberg)

362. Teaching or Supervising Laboratory or Fieldwork in Psychology. Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be elected for credit more than once.

See Spring Term description.

382. Introduction to Social Psychology. Introductory psychology. (4). (SS).

The purpose of this course is to introduce the students to social psychological research. In a first part, a general overview of the development of social psychological ideas, the methods used and the various subfields of social psychological research will be discussed. Part Two of the term is devoted to studying research on the two major topic areas of social psychology, namely on social cognition and social interaction (intra- and intergroup processes). Part Three of the term consists of a social psychological analysis of some concrete issues such as the increase in hate crimes against homosexuals, attitudes towards war, and affirmative action. Students should have taken an Introduction to Psychology course before enrolling in this class. The final grade will be based on a term paper, a midterm paper, a midterm and a final exam. The required textbook will be D. Myers SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (latest ed.). A course pack will be available at Albert's Copying. The method of instruction will be lecture and discussion. Cost:2 WL:1 (Inglehart)

444. Perception. Psych. 170, 172, 192 or 310. (3). (NS).

This is an advanced undergraduate course that focuses on basic perceptual phenomena and theories. At its most general level, human perception concerns the questions of how and why human beings conceive of, and experience immediate reality on the basis of sensory information. Topics covered include: Psychophysics, sensory transduction, Gestalt organization, constancy and contrast effects, expectation, selective attention, perceptual learning and symbolic representation. While the course is oriented toward the natural sciences, it also considers social, philosophical and esthetic perspectives. The instructor assumes some sophistication on the part of the students, however, no particular background is necessary. Thus, students with little specific knowledge of psychology are welcome. Grades will be determined on the basis of three short papers (each worth 20% of the grade) and one longer paper (worth 40% of the grade). The instructor also anticipates the development of a conference for the course on the MTS system. Questions concerning this class can be messaged to Robert Pachella using the MTS-UB message system. [Cost:1] [WL:5 Get on waitlist. At beginning of term be sure telephone number at CRISP is correct:If not call 764-1590 to give correct telephone number. As places in the course open up, we will call people IN ORDER from the waitlist.] (Pachella)

504. Individual Research. Permission of instructor. A combined total of 6 credits of Psych. 300-309, 504, and 506 may be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for a total of 6 credits.

See Spring Term description.

506. Tutorial Reading. Permission of instructor and a prior or concurrent course in an area related to the one in which tutorial reading is to be done. A combined total of 6 credits of Psych. 300-309, 504, and 506 may be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for a total of 6 credits.

See Spring Term description.

558. Psychology of Adolescence. Psych. 453 or 457; or permission of instructor. (3; IIIa and IIIb, 2-3). (Excl).

This course examines the adolescent period, largely from the points of view offered in personality, clinical, and social psychology. Although the course emphasizes the normal processes of adolescent development, for example, the achievement of ego identity, and the growth of mature modes of thinking and reasoning, it will also give close attention to such characteristically adolescent phenomena as delinquency and eating disorders, especially anorexia and bulimia. We will also try to understand the extraordinary increase in severe pathology among adolescents during the last two decades. There is a two-hour seminar discussion once each week; and the class members will also meet in groups of five or six once every two weeks. There is a term paper and a final essay examination. [Cost:2] [WL:1] (Adelson)

561/Soc. 561. Survey Research Design. One elementary statistics course. (2). (Excl).

INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICAL RESEARCH DESIGN Research in the social sciences has increasingly come to rely on statistical concepts in the development and evaluation of research designs, as well as in the presentation and analysis of data. The application of a wide variety of research designs, including both experimental and non-experimental designs require the understanding of basic statistical concepts. This course provides a basic introduction to concepts of research design and statistical reasoning. Topics include: elements of study design, necessary mathematical operations, central tendency, dispersion and variance, sampling error, sampling distributions, standard errors, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, and analysis of variance. (Yeaton)

562/Soc. 562. Survey Research Data Collection. One elementary statistics course. (2). (Excl).

SURVEY DESIGN AND DATA COLLECTION MAIL AND TELEPHONE TECHNIQUES In the United States face-to-face interview surveys are conducted less frequently than are surveys using mailed self-administered questionnaires or telephone interviews. The choice of mode of data collection has large effects on the costs, administrative design, sampling, nonresponse, and measurement design of the survey. This course offers training in the practical aspects of conducting surveys by mail and telephone, as well as a review of methodological research on the two methods. The course covers issues of sampling, nonresponse reduction, questionnaire design, computer assisted telephone interviewing, and survey administration. The student will learn the strengths and weaknesses of the individual methods, as well as the feasibility of designs that combine the two methods in a single survey. Prerequisite: An introductory course in survey research methods or equivalent experience. (Dillman/Biemer)

583/Soc. 583. Introduction to Survey Research I. Introductory psychology and statistics; or permission of instructor. (3; IIIb, 6). (Excl).

INTRODUCTION TO SURVEY RESEARCH This 8 week course provides an overview of the major steps involved in conducting a sample survey. The emphasis in the course is on the practical application of knowledge regarding survey design and data collection. A wide range of topics is covered, including: the uses of survey research, planning and design of surveys, coverage and sampling issues, questionnaire development, focus groups, modes of administration, pre-tests and pilot surveys, interviewing and interviewer training, coding, nonresponse and analysis issues. The course also has a practicum component that runs concurrent with the lecture/discussion component. All class members will work together in the conduct of an actual survey (usually in the Ann Arbor area), from the formulation of research questions to the presentation of findings to the client. This "hands-on" aspect of the class provides valuable practical experience to students without prior survey research background. (Quinn)


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