Courses in SOCIOLOGY (DIVISION 482)

Primarily for Underclass Students

100. Principles of Sociology. Open to freshmen and sophomores. Juniors are strongly encouraged to enroll in Soc. 400. Seniors must elect Soc. 400. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 400. No credit for seniors. (4). (SS).
Section 101.
This Introduction to Sociology is a broad survey course of the discipline of Sociology. We will cover theory, methods, and substantive subject areas in Sociology, in addition to critically examining the work of sociologists. The successful student should leave the course with an appreciation and understanding of sociology and sociologists. (Spraggins)

102. Contemporary Social Issues: An Introduction to Sociology. Open to freshmen and sophomores. Juniors are strongly encouraged and seniors must take Soc. 302, 303, 400, 401, 423, 444, 447, 450, 460, or 461. No credit for seniors. (SS). Credit is granted for a combined total of 8 credits elected through Soc. 102, 202, 203, and 401, provided that the course topics are different.
Section 101: Introduction to Sociology through Social Change and Ecology.
This course will explore many of the inter-connected issues, problems and explanatory models of social organization and the human-ecosystem interaction. Questions raised by various philosophies of nature and human nature will launch a more general analysis of human social relationships (for instance, the State, the Economy, Culture, Population etc.) and their connection to 'nature'/natural resources. We will than consider more specific instances of human attempts are influenced by work, community, gender, race/ethnicity, and class. Finally, we will examine social movements as the medium through which humans attempt to redefine their relationships with both socio-political structures and their environment, consequently expanding both the content and meaning of social-ecological interaction. (Dreiling)

202. Contemporary Social Issues I. (Excl). Credit is granted for a combined total of 8 credits elected through Soc. 102, 202, 203, and 401, provided that the course topics are different.
Section 101: Introduction to Sociology Through Social Inequality.
In this introduction to sociology, we will explore the pervasive influence of social and economic inequality in the United States today. We will explore inequality on the bases of race and ethnicity, class, sexual orientation, gender, and disability. We will discuss and critique the different theories which try to account for this inequality. Finally, the ramifications of being privileged or under-privileged in our society will be explored. Thus we will investigate what it means to be privileged or underprivileged in our society. Discussions, films, lectures, exercises and guest speakers will be used to convey ideas and concepts. Discussion of course material will be stressed, consequently a high level of participation will be expected. Reading will be moderately heavy. Grades will be based on quizzes, a final exam, and participation. (Gerschick)

Section 102: Sociology of Gender. This course will explore the social construction of gender in our everyday lives (i.e. the meanings and consequences of femininity and masculinity) as well as the structure of gender inequality in society including women's participation in the family and labor force, violence against women and struggles for empowerment. In addition to some interesting reading, course requirements will include several short written assignments and participation in class discussions. (Stark)

Section 103. Sociology of Deviance will examine how people become social deviants and how the institutions of our society contribute to the creation of deviance. The theories and methods of sociology will be employed to explain the origins and perpetuation of deviance. The course will first examine the legislative, enforcement, judicial, and corrections systems which determine who will be designated deviant and with what consequences. The emphasis will then shift to an examination of particular deviant acts with the goal of critically evaluating relevant sociological theory. The readings will cover both earlier pioneering research as well as more recent work in the field. The reading load will be moderate. The books will cost approximately $50. Course grades will be based largely on a term paper and final exam. (Kozura)

Section 105: American Family Relations. This course is designed to be a socio-historical examination of family relations in the United States. As such, American Indian, colonial, African American, and various immigrant family/household/kin structures will be addressed. When studying contemporary American family relations, particular attention will be paid to single-parent families and gay/lesbian relationships, in an effort to examine and understand the adaptability of family structures and the factors which might be said to facilitate or impede their change. The dominant perspective of these analyses will be that of a critical sociologist; but various readings from competing theorists and perspectives will be introduced, allowing for debate and criticism of any theoretical or analytical perspective. Course requirements: Class Attendance and Participation; Term Paper; Final Examination. (O'Hearon)

For Undergraduates Only

303. Racial and Cultural Contacts. One of the following: Soc. 100, 101, 102, 195, 202, 203, 400, or 401; or permission of instructor. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 503. (SS).

This course covers a segment of the history of racial and ethnic relations in the Western world from a variety of social science perspectives. Its goals are to look at racial and ethnic relations in a variety of historical settings and to examine the multiple ways in which these relations can be understood. Because of time limitations and the need to provide a focus, topics will generally be limited to the United states (although some outside material will also be considered). There is a large amount of reading involved which expects a rudimentary understanding of major social science perspectives (e.g., Marxism, Liberal Feminism, functionalism, etc.) and an elementary knowledge of social statistics. (Bettinger)

392/Hist. 332/Pol. Sci. 395/Slavic 395/REES 395. Survey of the Soviet Union. (SS).

See REES 395.

For Undergraduates and Graduates

423/Amer. Cult. 421. Social Stratification. (Excl).

This course is designed to provide us with an overall understanding of the general theoretical and research approaches to the area of "social stratification" considering the inequalities that are passed down from generation to generation. We should become aware of the nature and consequences of stratification and come to realize how stratification affects all aspects of social life. While our focus will be on the life experiences of the United States, we will examine inequalities in other societies, such as Japan and the Soviet Union, as well as in world context. In this regard, our inquiry into social stratification is both historical and comparative. Topics covered include: (1) what is inequality and why does it exist?; (2) inequality and class in the U.S.; (3) inequality and class in other society; and (4) the world system. We will inquire into these aspects through our readings, discussions, and, most importantly, our critical thinking. Students' initiatives and active participation in this inquiry are highly recommended. (Iburi)

468. Criminology. (SS).

In this course we explore the systematic study of crime focusing particularly on explanations of crime and societal reactions to crime (including law, police, courts, and correctional institutions). Students are encouraged to combine their study of lectures and the literature with their own exploration of the field to arrive at a better understanding of crime and how we might improve our dealing with it. [Cost:4] [WL:1]

475/MCO 475 (Public Health). Introduction to Medical Sociology. (SS).

This course will explore social aspects of health, aging, and the health care system in American society. We will examine such issues as the social causation of disease, relationships between doctors and patients, the health professions, health care among women and the poor and the current health care crisis. (Anspach)

495. Special Course. One of the following: Soc. 100, 101, 102, 195, 202, 203, 400, or 401; or permission of instructor. (Excl). May be repeated for credit, provided that the course topics are different.
Section 101: Men and Masculinities.
Masculinity as a gender role is a contested terrain filled with conflict and tension. Most everyone has an opinion of the appropriate roles for men. However, not everyone has equal amounts of power to act on their perspective. The primary goal of this course is to explore this contested terrain. It attempts to move beyond many Men's Studies courses which focus specifically on men by also examining how notions masculinity affect women and different groups of men. This course, then, has numerous objectives: (1) To get students to reflect on the consequences for men of being male and internalizing the social construct of masculinity. (2) To discuss the ways that women and men who are marginalized are affected by dominant conceptions of masculinity. (3) To elucidate and demystify men and masculinity. (4) To open up dialogue on this issue and link it to other contemporary social problems such as racism, sexism, and homophobia; specifically looking at how dominant conceptions of masculinity exacerbate them. Films, lectures, guest speakers, readings, and exercises will be used to convey ideas and concepts. Discussion of course material will be stressed, consequently a high level of participation will be expected. Reading will be moderately heavy. Grades will be based on a research paper and participation. (Gerschick)


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