Courses in COMMUNICATION (DIVISION 352)

100. Public Speaking. Not open to seniors. (Excl).

This course is recommended for students who will be pursuing degrees or careers in teaching, law, business, administration, or politics and others who are concerned with communicating effectively with the general public. Course topics include audience and speech analysis, source credibility, stage-fright, techniques of persuasion, and ethics. The ultimate purpose of the course is to encourage more effective communication by providing students with instruction and experiences which help them to be at ease before audiences and which encourages them to develop and present messages which have maximum audience impact. You must be present at the first two class meetings to hold your spot. WL:1 (Mikula)

103. Introduction to Mass Communication. Not open to seniors. (SS).

Providing an introduction to mass communication, this course examines the history and current processes involved in the creation of media products as part of American culture. The course investigates tensions between "high" and popular cultures, between print ad electronic media, and between modernism and post modernism. The course analyzes political, economic, social and moral factors confronting television, radio, movies, news, advertising, public relations, book publishing, magazines, music videos and sound recording. Three short writing projects required with emphasis on critical analysis of media. Two exams. Cost:NA WL:1 (Campbell)

290. News Writing. (Excl).

Covers the fundamentals of newspaper reporting and writing, including defining news, locating stories, documentation, interviewing, clarity in writing, news coverage strategies and copy editing. Weekly assignments. [Cost:2] [WL:1]

427. Preparation of Radio and TV Continuity. Junior standing. (Excl).

Students will write several non-dramatic scripts of radio and television program material. The weekly writing assignments include commercials, editorials, commentaries, documentaries, features, and public service announcements. Students must creatively write their scripts in the proper television or radio format, and the scripts must read for a precise amount of time. Good writing skills are essential for success in the course. The course will consist of lectures, peer evaluation of written work, in-class writing exercises, and analysis of professional scripts that are on audio or video tape. Attendance at every class is mandatory and students must participate in class discussions. This course may be taken to fulfill the ECB junior-senior writing requirement. WL:1

428. Writing Drama for Film and Television. Junior standing. (Excl).

This course is a workshop in writing dramatic narrative scripts for feature length films or made for T.V. movies. The objectives of this class are to teach skills for the development of dramatic concepts (structure, character, dialogue, etc.), to provide a better critical understanding of the devices used by screenwriters and filmmakers, to encourage an appreciation for the writer's role in filmmaking (both possibilities and limitations), and finally to teach the standard format of the screen play. This class requires the completion of a feature length screenplay, analysis of several scripts, group critiques of work, and various other writing assignments. Cost:1 WL:1 (Hurbis-Cherrier)


463/Soc. 463. Mass Communication and Public Opinion. Upperclass standing. (SS).

See Sociology 463. (Steeh)


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