NEAR EASTERN STUDIES

GENERAL NEAR EAST (DIVISION 439)

497. Senior Honors Thesis. Permission of instructor. (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

The Senior Honors thesis is for students who have been approved by the Near Eastern Studies concentration advisor, honor's advisor, and the LS&A Honor's Council. This course should be taken both semesters of the senior year, for not less than three or more than six credits per semester. The length of the thesis may vary, but 50-60 pages is common. Two advisors should be chosen. The principal advisor will be a member of the faculty in whose field of expertise the thesis topic lies, and he or she will oversee the student's research and the direction taken by the thesis. The deadline for submission of a draft of the thesis is the end of the week following spring break. The completed thesis must be submitted by the beginning of the exam period. Upon completion of the Honors thesis (and maintenance of a minimum overall grade point average of 3.5), Honors candidates may be recommended by the two advisors and Honors advisor for a degree "with highest Honors", or with "with Honors", in Near Eastern Studies (followed by the area of specialization). A notation is made on the diploma and the transcript.

ARABIC (AND BERBER) STUDIES (ARABIC: DIVISION 321)

Elementary and Intermediate Language Courses

201. Elementary Modern Standard Arabic. (FL).

No previous knowledge of Arabic is required for Arabic 201. This course is especially recommended for students concentrating in arabic or for those who expect to have some immediate use of Arabic; (2) control of the basic grammatical structures of the language; (3) mastery of about 800 vocabulary items; and (4) acquisition of related skills. The materials used are based on a combined approach stressing the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. This course starts with A Programmed Course in Modern Literary Arabic Phonology and Script, by Ernest N. McCarus and Raji Rammuny. These introductory programmed materials are usually completed within the first two weeks of classes. This is immediately followed by Elementary Modern Standard Arabic Part I, by Peter Abboud et al. This book is especially designed to provide careful guidance to both the student and the teacher. At the end of the course, the student is expected to be able to read printed and handwritten literary Arabic and to produce familiar material in a manner acceptable to a native speaker. In addition, the student should have acquired related skills to communicate (speak) in Arabic and use Arabic dictionaries. The course meets six hours per week for six credits. Use of language lab is necessary and strongly recommended to reinforce classroom work. The course grade is based on daily assignments, weekly quizzes, tests, classroom performance, and a final exam. Cost:2 WL:3 (Khaldieh)

202. Elementary Modern Standard Arabic. Arabic 201 or equivalent. (FL).

This course is especially recommended for students concentrating in Arabic or those who expect to use Arabic. The primary goals of this course are to have students develop the ability to: (1) communicate/ speak in Arabic with native speakers of Arabic on familiar topics, (2) understand familiar spoken Arabic, (3) read and understand the specific content of an elementary level, and (4) communicate in writing and provide correct responses within the scope of the content of this course. This course is taught in Arabic using a communicative approach emphasizing the use of language. Course grade is based on class attendance and participation, written assignments, tests and quizzes, and a final exam. Required test: Peter Abboud et al., Elementary Standard Arabic, Part I. Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan, 1975. (Khaldieh)


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