Courses in Psychology (Division 455)

The Department of Psychology offers two regular introductory courses: Psychology 111 and Psychology 112. Psychology 112 is offered as a natural science and stresses experimental psychology; Psychology 111 is approved for social science distribution but treats both perspectives with about equal weight. Students may not receive credit for Psychology 111 and Psychology 112. Either of the two courses meets the prerequisite requirement for concentration and serves as a prerequisite for advanced courses.

111(172). Introduction to Psychology. Psych. 111 serves, as do Psych. 112 or 113, as a prerequisite for advanced courses in the department and as a prerequisite to concentration. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112, 113, 114, or 115. Psych. 111 may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (SS). Students in Psychology 111 are required to spend five hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects.

This course is a one-term survey which integrates material from Psychology 112 and 113. It is a broad introduction to the whole of psychology. The course serves as a basic preparation for most advanced level courses in psychology. Discussion sections offer students the opportunity to discuss and critically examine what they are learning. Cost:3 WL:1 (Morris)

112(170). Introduction to Psychology as a Natural Science. Credit is granted for both Psych. 112 and 113; no credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 111, 114, or 115. Psych. 112 may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (NS). Students in Psychology 112 are required to spend five hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects.

The course emphasizes the biological, experimental and comparative approaches to psychology. Three main themes tie together the topics introduced in the course: (1) What is the scientific methodology used to describe and understand behavior? (2) Why have particular behaviors evolved? (3) How are specific behaviors produces. Students are evaluated with 3 exams, two short papers and discussion participation. The course meets 8 hours per week, half lecture and half discussion. Cost:2-3 WL:1 (Lee)

361. Advanced Laboratory in Organizational Psychology. Psych. 360. (Excl)

This advanced laboratory will cover several approaches to enhancing individual, group, and organizational effectiveness. We will focus on role analysis and negotiation, competencies of an effective consultant, impression management, group planning and decision making, diversity in workforce, and work redesign. The instructor will introduce each topic to the class members by giving a brief overview of the framework, lecture or workshop to provide some firsthand experience with the concepts and phenomena we are studying. Subsequently, the class will reflect on the presentation and discuss relevant readings, processes and assignments. Finally, students (individually and in groups) will conduct field research projects, deliver class presentations and complete written reports which will then be delineated in class. Cost:3 WL:1 (Beale)

370. Introduction to Psychopathology. Introductory psychology. (SS).
(3 credits).
This course overviews abnormal psychology, emphasizing psychological explanations of such problems in living as anxiety, depression, drug abuse, and sexual dysfunction, as well as their treatment by psychological means. Grades are based on examination performance. Books include Rosenhan and Seligman's 2nd edition of ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY. Additional readings may be assigned. Cost:2 WL:1 (Peterson)

381(516)/Soc. 472. Advanced Laboratory in Social Psychology. Stat. 402 and Psych. 380. (Excl).

The lab looks at the psychology of social change. Each student carries out an independent project. The student chooses a change effort that is personally significant. Through observation and semi-structured interviews with leaders, followers, opposition, and audience, the student identifies and considers the conceptions of change and influence that implicitly guide the effort, and also looks at the life histories that bring participants to the engagement. A good chance to sharpen skills at field research. Cost:2 WL:1 Must attend first two class meetings. (Ezekiel)

408(308). Field Practicum. One of the following: Psychology 330, 340, 350, 360, 370, 380, or 390; and permission of instructor. Degree credit is granted for a combined total of 15 credits elected through Psych. 211 and 404-409. Credit is granted for a combined total of 12 credits through the series Psychology 404-409. A combined total of 6 credits of Psychology 404-408, 504, and 506 may be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL).

WORKING WITH CHILDREN. Directed experience with children aged eighteen months to five years at the University of Michigan's Children Center and Children's Center for Working Families for approximately eight to twelve hours per week on a regular basis. Seminar relating theoretical issues to applied practice is held every two weeks. No prerequisites required. Course is intended to introduce students to children in a child care setting. Cost:1 WL:5, Permission of instructor required for all students (Sternberg)

464. Group Behavior in Organizations. Psych. 360. (Excl).

This course introduces students to a wide range of concepts and issues in group behavior. It is the second in a series of three courses that includes Psychology 360 (Individual Behavior in Organizations) and Psychology 565 (Organization Systems). Students may elect to take this course without taking the other two courses. The course presents information on the design and management of small task groups within organizations. The course focuses both on the contextual significance of groups and the impact of intrapsychic forces on groups. Both experiential and didactic teaching methods will be used and course material will include research literature, case studies, examples from contemporary organizations and the instructor's own research and consulting experience. Students will be required to work in small groups. Cost:2 WL:4 (Davis-Sacks).

471(385). Marriage and the Family. Introductory psychology. (SS).

An intensive introduction to the clinical and research literatures on the family in contemporary American society. Designed especially for students interested in clinical work with families, the course will examine family process, assessment, and intervention from the conceptual vantage point of general systems theory. (S.Olson)

571. Advanced Topics in Clinical Psychology. Psych. 370. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.
Section 101 Culture and Clinical Psychology .
This advanced undergraduate seminar will explore the definition of culture using constructivist and general systems perspective. How do cultural differences manifest themselves and shape the delivery of therapy and research. Particular attention will be placed on African American, Asian American, Native American and Latino cultures in the United States. (Tirado)

581. Advanced Topics in Social Psychology. Psych. 380. (Excl). May be repeated for credit.
Section 101. Lives in Social Context.
A field work course; challenging and somewhat unusual. Each student selects a group of people of particular interest. Usually people in a neighborhood that is very different from the sort of neighborhood she grew up in. Sometimes, alternatively, people whose lives have special relevance to her, such as people practicing a profession she plans. The student then creates in-depth prolonged meetings with a small number of these people and writes up each week these meetings and her reflections on them. This journal is checked every two weeks. The course also will deal with about five books. Real investment of time: about ten actual hours/week. Independent and curious students will do best. Cost:2 WL:1 (Ezekiel)

Section 102 The Psychology of Juvenile Delinquency. Will consider a broad range of psychological theory and findings in addressing the question of why some juveniles become more delinquent than others. With particular emphasis on understanding the etiology and treatment of the chronic, serious delinquent, the course will explore genetic, physiological, developmental, learning, motivational, cognitive, personality, clinical, social, and cultural psychology. Instructional methods include texts and primary material; informal presentations in class by instructor, guests, and students; and discussions. Evaluation of student performance will be based on six brief essays on topics assigned by the instructor and a term paper that, drawing from the student's review of the literature, proposes a research project on the prevention, etiology, and/or treatment of juvenile delinquency. (Gold)

Independent Study/Directed Reading.

204. Individual Research. & 206. Tutorial Reading. Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake individual research or plans of study under the direction of a member of the staff. Students are provided with the proper section number by the staff member with whom the work has been arranged. Students are responsible for properly registering for this course.

504. Individual Research and 506. Tutorial Reading. Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake individual research or plans of study under the direction of a member of the staff. Work in 504 must include the collection and analysis of data and a written report. Work in 506 provides an opportunity for further exploration of a topic of interest in Psychology. Students are responsible for being properly registered for this course, which includes a contract signed by the instructor, and approval of the Committee on Undergraduate Studies contracts are available from the Undergraduate Psychology Office K106, 580 Union Drive, and must be returned there for approval and an override.

The field practicum courses (Psych 404-409) offer an opportunity to integrate experiential and academic work within the context of a field setting. Students make their own arrangements to work in various community agencies and organizations; meet regularly with a faculty sponsor to discuss their experiences; read materials which are relevant to their experiences; and create some form of written product that draws experiences together at the end of the term. Obtain materials as early as possible as it generally takes students some time to meet requirements necessary to register for the course. An override from a Psychology Department faculty member is required to register. N.B. This course is an Experiential course and no more than 30 credits may be counted toward the 120 hours required for graduation.

Field Practicums and Psych 504, 506 have prerequisites of one of the following: Psychology 330, 340, 350, 360, 370, 380, or 390; and permission of instructor. Degree credit is granted for a combined total of 15 credits elected through Psych. 211 and 404-409. A combined total of 6 credits of Psychology 404-408, 504, and 506 may be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Credit is granted for a combined total of 12 credits elected through the series Psych. 404-409. Psych 504 and 506 each can be elected for a maximum of 6 credits each.

The following limitations apply to Experiential and Directed Reading/Independent Study credit:

  1. A maximum 15 credits of Experiential courses may be counted toward a degree; a maximum 8 credits may be earned from one project, and only one such Experiential project may be elected each term.
  2. A combined total 30 credits of Experiential and Directed Reading/Independent Study courses may be counted in the 120 credits required for a degree.
  3. Experiential and Independent courses are excluded from area distribution plans.

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