Courses in Psychology (Division 455)

The Department of Psychology offers two regular introductory courses: Psychology 111 and Psychology 112. Psychology 112 is offered as a natural science and stresses experimental psychology; Psychology 111 is approved for social science distribution but treats both perspectives with about equal weight. Students will not receive credit for Psychology 111 and Psychology 112. Either of the two courses meets the prerequisite requirement for concentration and serves as a prerequisite for advanced courses.

111(172). Introduction to Psychology. Psych. 111 serves, as do Psych. 112 or 113, as a prerequisite for advanced courses in the department and as a prerequisite to concentration. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112, 113, 114, or 115. Psych. 111 may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (4). (SS). Students in Psychology 111 are required to spend five hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects.

This course is a one-term survey which integrates material from Psychology 112 and 113. It is a broad introduction to the whole of psychology. The course serves as a basic preparation for most advanced level courses in psychology. Discussion sections offer students the opportunity to discuss and critically examine what they are learning. Cost:3 WL:1

112(170). Introduction to Psychology as a Natural Science. Credit is granted for both Psych. 112 and 113; no credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 111, 114, or 115. Psych. 112 may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (4). (NS). Students in Psychology 112 are required to spend five hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects.

This course provides a broad introduction to the field of psychology with an emphasis on natural science perspectives. The topics include human behavior including neural and biological mechanisms, sensation and perception, consciousness, learning and memory, reasoning and intelligence, life-span development, motivation and emotion, personality and individual differences, social influences, and abnormal behavior. The text is Atkinson, Atkinson, Smith, and Bem (11th Ed.) Harcourt-Brace-Jovanovich, supplemented by three popular press books. Each student is expected to participate actively in discussion and laboratory sessions. Grading is based on performance on three exams and completion of three short writing assignments. Cost:2-3 WL:2 (Seifert)

330(331). Introduction to Biopsychology. Introductory psychology. (3). (NS).

This course surveys the field of Biopsychology and introduces the kinds of questions addressed by physiological and comparative psychologists. Biopsychology is an area of study concerned with physiological and evolutionary explanations of perception, cognition and behavior. Among topics to be discussed are the following: animal behavior from an evolutionary perspective; psychological and neural mechanisms involved in sensory processes, motor control (movement and posture), regulatory behaviors (feeding, drinking), learning, memory, and cognition in humans and other species. Students must register for the lecture and one discussion/practicum session. NOTE: This course is intended for second term Freshmen and Sophomores. Psych 330 will be the prerequisite for many upper-level Biopsychology courses. Cost:2 WL:1 (Berridge)

341(310). Superlab in Psychology as a Natural Science. Psych. 330 or 340. (4). (NS). Satisfies a Psychology advanced laboratory requirement.

This course fulfills one of the advanced laboratory requirements in Psychology. It is designed to acquaint psychology concentrators with a wide range of methods and topics applicable to the scientific study of behavior. The general objectives of the course are to learn why people do psychology research, to understand the logic of experimentation, to gain experience of experimentation, to learn to critically evaluate research findings. The performance objectives of the course are to be able to construct and carry out an experiment to test a given hypothesis, to be able to analyze the data from an experiment, to be able to present the experiment and its results in a clear, concise manner, and to be able to clearly communicate ideas in written form. Experimental methods are demonstrated using examples from vision and perception, pattern recognition, memory systems, language, problem solving, and decision making. Grading is based on exams and reports of three experiments conducted by students. Cost:2 WL:1

370. Introduction to Psychopathology. Introductory psychology. (3). (SS).

This course will provide an overview of abnormal psychology, focusing on the assessment and diagnosis of psychiatric disorders. We will also explore several explanatory systems (psychodynamic, behavioral/cognitive behavioral and biopsychological) that offer accounts of the etiology of these disorders and provide treatment strategies. The readings for this course will include clinical case studies, theoretical essays and empirical research papers. Course requirements include: attendance at lecture, course readings, and in-class examinations. A short paper may also be assigned. (Hansell/Leary)

381(516)/Soc. 472. Advanced Laboratory in Social Psychology. Stat. 402 and Psych. 380. (3). (Excl). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.
Section 101.
Students design and implement a small survey and laboratory experiment on a standard social psychological topics such as personality and political beliefs, cooperation and competition, group discussion and attitude change, bargaining and negotiation, etc. Instruction carried out via discussion and demonstration plus a small number of lectures. Grades based primarily on papers in which students analyze and write-up the results of their research projects. Quality of participation in class and in research teams is also taken into account. Cost:2 WL:1

390(452). Introduction to the Psychology of Personality. Introductory psychology. (3). (SS).

This course provides a broad survey of personality psychology, focusing on three levels of analysis: human nature, sex differences, and individual differences. These levels are examined from several theoretical perspectives, including evolutionary, psychoanalytic, motivational, cognitive, phenomenological, interactional, and dispositional. Emphasis will be placed on the interaction between internal personality characteristics and the social context within which individuals operate. Lectures and readings include a balance of theory and research. The course includes two lectures per week. (Buss)

401. Special Problems in Psychology as a Social Science. Introductory psychology. Only 6 credits of Psych. 400, 401, 402, 500, 501, and 502 combined may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology. (1-4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 12 credits.
Section 101 The Psychology of Social Movements. (3 credits).
This course examines social movements through the lens of psychology. We read 9 books, 5 on illuminative psychological principles and 4 accounts of 20th-century social movements or collective actions: the student movement of the 60s, the Chinese Cultural Revolution, a Nazi police battalion, and a French village that worked together to rescue thousands of Jews. We analyze these events, asking questions like: Why did people join? Why did they behave as they did as part of these collectivities? What makes social movements go wrong - or right? The course uses the seminar format. Exams assess mastery of the psychological material. Discussion is based on daily written analyses of the readings. In a final integrative paper students analyze either a personal experience in a social movement or group, or a historical social movement. Grades are based on exams, daily seminar papers, and the integrative analysis. Cost:3 WL:1 (Landman)

408(308). Field Practicum. One of the following: Psychology 330, 340, 350, 360, 370, 380, or 390; and permission of instructor. Degree credit is granted for a combined total of 15 credits elected through Psych. 211 and 404-409. Credit is granted for a combined total of 12 credits through the series Psychology 404-409. A combined total of 6 credits of Psychology 404-408, 504, and 506 may be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (1-12). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL).
Section 101 Working with Children.
Directed experience with children aged eighteen months to five years at the University of Michigan's Children Center and Children's Center for Working Families for approximately eight to twelve hours per week on a regular basis. Seminar relating theoretical issues to applied practice is held every two weeks. No prerequisites required. Course is intended to introduce students to children in a child care setting. Cost:1 WL:5, Permission of instructor required for all students (Sternberg)

581. Advanced Topics in Social Psychology. Psych. 380. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.
Section 101 The Psychology of Juvenile Delinquency.
Will consider a broad range of psychological theory and findings in addressing the question of why some juveniles become more delinquent than others. With particular emphasis on understanding the etiology and treatment of the chronic, serious delinquent, the course will explore genetic, physiological, developmental, learning, motivational, cognitive, personality, clinical, social, and cultural psychology. Instructional methods include texts and primary material; informal presentations in class by instructor, guests, and students; and discussions. Evaluation of student performance will be based on six brief essays on topics assigned by the instructor and a term paper that, drawing from the student's review of the literature, proposes a research project on the prevention, etiology, and/or treatment of juvenile delinquency. (Gold)

Section 102 The Perception of the Social and Political System in the Time of Transition to Democracy in Central Europe. For Spring Term, 1994, this section is offered jointly with REES 405. (Wojciszke)

Independent Study/Directed Reading

The department of psychology offers several options for independent study/directed reading.

204. Individual Research. & 206. Tutorial Reading. Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake individual research or plans of study under the direction of a member of the staff. Students are provided with the proper section number by the staff member with whom the work has been arranged. Students are responsible for properly registering for this course.

504. Individual Research and 506. Tutorial Reading. Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake individual research or plans of study under the direction of a member of the staff. Work in 504 must include the collection and analysis of data and a written report. Work in 506 provides an opportunity for further exploration of a topic of interest in Psychology. Students are responsible for being properly registered for this course, which includes a contract signed by the instructor, and approval of the Committee on Undergraduate Studies contracts are available from the Undergraduate Psychology Office K106, 580 Union Drive, and must be returned there for approval and an override.

The field practicum courses (Psych 404-408) offer an opportunity to integrate experiential and academic work within the context of a field setting. Students make their own arrangements to work in various community agencies and organizations; meet regularly with a faculty sponsor to discuss their experiences; read materials which are relevant to their experiences; and create some form of written product that draws experiences together at the end of the term. Obtain materials as early as possible as it generally takes students some time to meet requirements necessary to register for the course. An override from a Psychology Department faculty member is required to register.

Field Practicums and Psych 504, 506 have prerequisites of one of the following: Psychology 330, 340, 350, 360, 370, 380, or 390; and permission of instructor. Degree credit is granted for a combined total of 15 credits elected through Psych. 211 and 404-409. A combined total of 6 credits of Psychology 404-408, 504, and 506 may be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Credit is granted for a combined total of 12 credits elected through the series Psych. 404-409. Psych 504 and 506 each can be elected for a maximum of 6 credits each.

The following limitations apply to Experiential and Directed Reading/Independent Study credit:

  1. A maximum 15 credits of Experiential courses may be counted toward a degree; a maximum 8 credits may be earned from one project, and only one such Experiential project may be elected each term.
  2. A combined total 30 credits of Experiential and Directed Reading/Independent Study courses may be counted in the 120 credits required for a degree.
  3. Experiential and Independent courses are excluded from area distribution plans.

lsa logo

University of Michigan | College of LS&A | Student Academic Affairs | LS&A Bulletin Index

This page maintained by LS&A Academic Information and Publications, 1228 Angell Hall

The Regents of the University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA +1 734 764-1817

Trademarks of the University of Michigan may not be electronically or otherwise altered or separated from this document or used for any non-University purpose.