Courses in Biology (Division 328)

Section 711 on biology courses reflects offerings at the UM Biological Station

330. Biology of Birds. Two collegiate courses in biology. IIIb at the Biological Station. (5). (Excl). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement.
Section 711.
An introduction to ornithology with emphasis on field identification of the birds of northern Michigan. Field trips are to a variety of habitats in the region. Labs include classification, morphology, and identification of study specimens. Lectures cover a variety of topics in the evolution, physiology, behavior, and ecology of birds. Each student participates in a group project that analyzes historical bird data from the UMBS region. (Cuthbert)

381. General Ecology. Biol. 152-154 or 195 (or the equivalent); and a laboratory course in chemistry. I and IIIb in Ann Arbor; IIIa and IIIb at Biol. Station. (6 in Ann Arbor; 5 at Biol. Station). (Excl). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement.
Section 201.
This course introduces the basic concepts and principles of ecology as applied to the study of individuals, populations and communities of both plants and animals. Course topics include the role of physical and biotic factors influencing the distribution and abundance of organisms, dynamics of single species populations, competitive, predator-prey, and mutualistic interactions, community organization, ecological succession, evolutionary aspects of ecology, and current applications of ecology to problems of environment and resource management. Biology 381 is a suitable prerequisite for intermediate and advanced courses in ecology. There are four lectures a week. The laboratory meets four days a week for three hours at the Matthaei Botanical Gardens, 1800 Dixboro Road. Field trips to outlying study areas are included. Free bus transportation between the Main Campus and the Botanical Gardens is provided. Cost:3 WL:1

Section 711. The study of the factors influencing the distribution and abundance of animals and plants. Course topics include individual ecology (abiotic and biotic limiting factors), population ecology (population dynamics, competition, predation, and other species interactions), community ecology (species diversity and succession), ecosystem ecology (nutrient cycling and energy flow), and human impact on the ecosystem. Lecture and discussion will be supplemented by field projects designed to test a variety of ecological questions in a range of terrestrial and aquatic communities. Students will conduct an individual research project at the end of the course. (Jolis)

431. Ecology of Animal Parasites. Two laboratory courses in biology. IIIb at the Biological Station. (5). (Excl). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement.
Section 711.
Various ecological aspects of animal parasite populations will be studied including life cycles, species diversity, diel and seasonal periodicity, intra- and interspecific competition, host specificity, longevity, recruitment, pathology and parasite-induced behavioral changes in the host. Field and laboratory techniques for studying these host-parasite relationships will be emphasized. (Blankespoor )

442. Biology of Insects. Any college-level biology course. I in Ann Arbor; IIIb at Biological Station. (Offered in alternate years in Ann Arbor). (5). (Excl). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement.
Section 711.
This course introduces students to entomology, emphasizing the diversity of insects, their life histories, ecology and behavior. It does this through identification and natural history study of the orders and major families of insects. Field work will include trips to major habitats of the area for study and collection and short class projects an ecological and evolutionary questions. Laboratory work will include examining basic insect structure and preparation of individual collections. Lecture topics will include coverage of insect groups, evolution and phylogeny, ecology, behavior and physiology. (Scholtens)

453. Field Mammalogy. Two laboratory courses in biology. IIIb at the Biological Station. (Offered in alternate years). (5). (Excl). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement.
Section 711.
An introduction to the study of mammals. Students will learn methods of studying mammals in the field by carrying out a series of projects on the wild mammals of northern Michigan. These projects will be designed to give familiarity with areas of active research on the ecology of mammals and practical experience with the excitement and headaches of formulating hypotheses, carrying out field work, and analyzing data. Some familiarity with elementary statistics is helpful but not necessary. (Myers)

457. Freshwater Phycology. Two laboratory courses in botany. IIIb at the Biological Station. (5). (Excl). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement.
Section 711.
A survey of the algae of northern Michigan with emphasis on taxonomy and ecology. Students become familiar with the algae of streams, bogs, fens, swamps, beach pools, and the Laurentian Great Lakes. Special attention is given to field investigations of periphyton and phytoplankton community ecology and their application to water quality assessment. (Myers)

471. Bryophytes. Two laboratory courses in biology and one course in organismal botany. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Biology 472. IIIb at the Biological Station. (3-5). (Excl). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement.
Section 711.
A field and laboratory approach to morphology, evolution, life history, ecology, and taxonomy of mosses and hepatics. Emphasis is given to the morphology of liverworts, the taxonomy of Sphagnum and the role peat mosses play in wetland ecology. (Crum)

475. Conservation Biology and Ecosystem Management. Two courses in the biological sciences including ecology, or permission of instructor. III at the Biological Station. (5). (Excl).
Section 711.
This course draws on biological principles from ecology and genetics relevant to species conservation and ecosystem management. Coverage of each topic will include formal lectures and class discussion, but students will spend the bulk of their time working in groups on field and computer-based projects. (Allan)

482. Limnology. Three laboratory courses in botany or zoology. IIIb at the Biological Station. (5). (Excl). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement.
Section 711.
This course introduces the fundamentals of aquatic ecology (with an emphasis on lakes) from an ecosystem-level approach. General limnological principles as well as physical, chemical and biological parameters of lakes will be studied. Biological investigations include an introduction to the ecology and taxonomy of the algae, zooplankton, macroinvertebrates, macrophytes, and fishes. Field studies include a comparative lake survey in which students will gain experience in field sampling, laboratory analysis of samples, statistical analysis and interpretation of data for several types of lakes including the Laurentian Great Lakes. (Tuchman)

486. Biology and Ecology of Fish. Two laboratory courses in biology. IIIb at the Biological Station. (Offered in alternate years). (5). (Excl). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement.
Section 711.
Field and laboratory studies of fish communities. Field trips will sample a variety of aquatic habitats in the area, with analysis of habitat characteristics and fish community composition. Laboratories and lectures will examine physiological, behavioral, and functional morphological factors that determine possible ('fundamental') habitat range, and modifying organismic interactions such as predation and competition leading to actual ('realized') distributions. Strengths and weaknesses of various research approaches to analysis of communities will be evaluated. (Webb)

556. Boreal Flora. A course in systematic botany or local flora in another region. IIIb at the Biological Station. (5). (Excl). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement.
Section 711.
Characteristic vascular plants of the northern Great Lakes region, with stress on distinctive phytogeographical patterns, natural history, and field identification of species of bogs, dunes, shores, and the boreal forest. Field work is done in Michigan and Ontario to see relations of those species and their habitats to the recent geological history of the landscape, with background emphasis on plants of northern latitudes generally. Designed as a second course for students who already have some experience in vascular plant taxonomy, including identification of common families and species. (Voss)

585. Ecology of Streams and Rivers. A previous or concurrent course in limnology, aquatic ecology, phycology, or aquatic invertebrates is recommended. IIIb at the Biological Station. (5). (Excl). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement.
Section 711.
This course takes an integrated approach to the study of population, community, and ecosystem structure and function in flowing water. Observation and experimentation are utilized to explore interactions among algae, aquatic plants, invertebrates, and fish and their physical and chemical environments in streams and rivers. Emphasis will be on basic taxonomy, natural history, growth, competition, predation, and ecosystem theories. One stream is studied in detail. Field trips are taken to other streams for comparison. Research experiences are emphasized. (Stevenson)


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