Courses in Economics (Division 358)

A. Introductory Courses

201. Principles of Economics I. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 400. I, II, IIIa, and IIIb. (3). (SS).

See Economics 201 (Spring Term).

202. Principles of Economics II. Econ. 201. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Econ. 400. I, II, IIIa, and IIIb. (3). (SS).

See Economics 202 (Spring Term).

B. Economic Theory and Statistics

402. Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory. Econ. 201 and 202, and Math. 115. (3). (SS).

This course in macroeconomics deals with the determination of broad economic aggregates such as national income, employment, the price level, and the balance of payments in both the short run and the long run. Rigorous analysis is used to understand the forces that determine these economic variables, and how they are affected by public policies. It is predominantly a lecture course, with grades based on hour test(s) and final exam. Prerequisites include one term of calculus. Economics 402 is a prerequisite for many other courses offered in Economics. Concentrators are required to elect this course and are encouraged to complete it early in their concentration program. It is strongly recommended that students take Economics 401 before 402. Cost:3 WL:3 (Johnson)

G. Comparative Economic Systems and National Economies

350. Comparative Economic Systems. Econ. 201 and 202. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 451. (3). (Excl).

Theoretical models and case studies of selected aspects of different economic systems, including (1) capitalist regulated market economies, (2) socialist regulated market economies, and (3) socialist centrally planned economies. WL:1 (Bernasek)


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