Courses in Geological Sciences (Division 377)

116. Introductory Geology in the Field. Reduced credit is granted for GS 116 to those with credit for an introductory course in geology on campus (GS 117, 118, 119, 205, or 206). Contact the department undergraduate advisor for details about reduced credit. IIIb at Camp Davis, Wyoming. (8). (NS).
Section 721. (July 2- August 17 at Camp Davis, Wyoming).
Students may earn eight credits for studying Introductory Geology in the Rocky Mountains, including: Yellowstone National Park, Grand Tetons, Dinosaur National Monument, and Craters of the Moon. This field course is taught at Camp Davis, a permanent facility built by the University in 1929. Camp Davis is about 20 miles south of Jackson, Wyoming, near the junction of the Overthrust Belt, the Snake River Plain, the Wind River Range, and the Green River Basin; the Tetons lie to the north, the Gros Ventre Range to the east, and the Basin and Range Province to the west. It is simply an excellent place to learn about geology. The camp is located on the Hoback River near its junction with the Snake River; the trout fishing is great.

This is an in-depth course covering all aspects of geology. The thrust of this course is to teach students about earth processes and history in a variety of settings. Approximately two weeks of the course are spent on trips to other parts of Wyoming as well as Nevada, Montana, Idaho, and Utah. Students examine minerals, rocks, and fossils in their natural settings. Although lectures are a part of the course, most of the time is spent in the field where instruction is often on an individual basis. GS 116 helps to meet the natural science distribution requirement in the College. The course has no prerequisites. GS 116 runs for 7 weeks. The dates for the 1994 summer course will be from July 2, when the caravan leaves from Ann Arbor, until August 17, the day that the caravan arrives back in Ann Arbor.

Costs, including lodging, meals, tuition, health fee, and transportation to and from Camp Davis are $2,350 for all Michigan residents and $2,700 for all nonresidents. All class-related equipment and field vehicles connected with the course are supplied by the University. For an application form, write to the Department of Geological Sciences, U-M, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1063. Cost:2 (Owen)

B. Primarily for Concentrators

440. Field Course in Geology. Elementary trigonometry, G.S. 310 and 351, or the equivalent. IIIb at Camp Davis, Wyoming. (8). (Excl).

The University of Michigan geology field course is taught at Camp Davis, a permanent facility built by the University in 1929. Camp Davis is about 30 km south of Jackson, Wyoming, very near the junction of the Overthrust Belt, the Snake River Plain, the Wind River Range, and the Green River Basin.

GS 440 is a broad, in-depth course covering all aspects of field geology. The thrust of this course is to train students to interpret and report on the nature of a variety of geological terrains and to improve their skill in solving geological problems. Field projects include the mapping and interpretation of glacial, deformed sedimentary, regional metamorphic, contact metamorphic, plutonic, and volcanic complexes. Approximately two weeks of the course are spent on trips to other parts of Wyoming as well as to South Dakota, Montana, Idaho, Utah and Colorado.

Successful completion of courses in mineralogy (GS 231), sedimentary geology (GS 305), igneous and metamorphic petrology (GS 310), and structural geology (GS 351) is required for admission to this course. GS 440 runs for 7 weeks in 1993. The caravan will depart Ann Arbor on June 30 and arrive back in Ann Arbor on August 17.

Costs, including lodging, meals, tuition, health fee, and transportation to and from Camp Davis are $2,182 for all Michigan residents and $2,506 for all nonresidents. All class-related equipment and field vehicles connected with the course are supplied by the University. For an application form, write to the Department of Geological Sciences, U-M, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1063. Cost:2 (Owen)


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