Near Eastern Studies

ANCIENT AND BIBLICAL STUDIES (ABS: DIVISION 317)

280/Rel. 280. Jesus and the Gospels. (3). (HU).

The course will examine the Gospels as literary works and as expressions of the faith and thought of the first-century Christian communities. These documents will be studied within the broader context of the first-century Jewish world, which provided the primary milieu for both the life of Jesus and the life of the first Christians. The course will also introduce students to the various critical methods employed by New Testament scholars, and will explore what can be known by means of these methods of the history of the traditions found in the Gospels and of the person of Jesus of Nazareth, to whom these traditions testify. The course will consist of lecture and discussion. Students will be evaluated on the basis of class participation, two examinations, and one research paper. (Kinzer)

Arabic (and Berber) Studies (Arabic: Division 321)

Elementary and Intermediate Language Courses

101. Elementary Modern Standard Arabic. IIIb. (4). (LR).

This is the first course of a two-term sequence in elementary Arabic. It is designed for non-concentrators and those who need Arabic to fulfill the language requirement. It provides an introduction to the phonology and script of Modern Standard Arabic and its basic vocabulary and fundamental structures. It offers combined training in listening, speaking, reading and writing. There will be focus on simple interactive communicative tasks involving teacher-student, student-student and group interactions. Reading and cultural skills are developed through simple short texts and situational dialogues. There will be daily written assignments involving supplying answers to certain drills and questions on reading comprehension passages, filling out forms and writing short messages and paragraphs. Evaluation will be based on class participation, weekly achievement tests, monthly comprehensive tests, and a final exam. Regular use of the language laboratory or recorded tapes for home use is required to reinforce class work and also to do the recorded assignments. Class meets 4 hours per week. Textbooks: (1) A Programmed Course in Modern Standard Arabic Phonology and Script by McCarus Rammuny; (2) Elementary Modern Standard Arabic Part One by Abboud, et al. (Lessons 1-10); (3) a course pack including supplementary cultural materials, dialogues, and special activities. (Khaldieh)

102. Elementary Modern Standard Arabic. Arabic 101 or equivalent. (4). (LR).

In 102, the basic vocabulary and fundamental structures of Arabic are continued through vocabulary lists, grammar presentations and oral and written practice based on short readings including simple news items, narration and description. There is increased emphasis on developing conversational, reading and writing skills. There will be focus on communicative drills and activities involving teacher-student, student-student, and group interactions. Daily written assignments are required involving biographical information, and writing short descriptions and narration utilizing vocabulary and structures covered in class. Class meets four hours per week. Grades are based on class participation, weekly achievement tests, monthly comprehensive tests, and a final exam including an oral component. Textbooks: (1) Elementary Modern Standard Arabic, Part One (Lessons 1 1-20); and (2) a course pack including supplementary cultural material, dialogues and activities. (Khaldieh)

201(231). Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic. Arabic 102 or 201. (4). (LR).

No previous knowledge of Arabic is required for Arabic 201. This course is especially recommended for students concentrating in Arabic or for those who expect to have some immediate use of Arabic its primary goals are: (1) use of Arabic in communication; (2) control of the basic grammatical structures of the language; (3) mastery of about 800 vocabulary items; and (4) acquisition of related skills. The materials used are based on a combined approach stressing the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. This course starts with A Programmed Course in Modern Literary Arabic Phonology and Script, by Ernest N. McCarus and Raji Rammuny. These introductory programmed materials are usually completed within the first week of classes. This is immediately followed by Elementary Modern Standard Arabic Part I, by Peter Abboud et al in addition to supplementary proficiency-based materials. This book is especially designed to provide careful guidance to both the student and the teacher. At the end of the course, the student is expected to be able to read printed and handwritten literary Arabic and to produce familiar material in a manner acceptable to a native speaker. In addition, the student should have acquired related skills to communicate (speak) in Arabic and use Arabic dictionaries. The course meets sixteen hours per week for eight credits. Use of language lab is necessary and strongly recommended to reinforce classroom work. The course grade is based on daily assignments, weekly quizzes, tests, classroom performance, and a final exam. Cost:2 WL:3 (Kalliel)

202(232). Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic. Arabic 102 or equivalent. (4). (LR).

In Arabic 202, students will continue learning more practical vocabulary and complex grammatical constructions through reading selections containing journalistic prose, short stories and descriptions. This course aims at a further development of students' communication, reading, and writing skills. Students who complete this course successfully will satisfy the FL requirement. They will be able to (1) grasp the meaning of short Arabic passages dealing with familiar basic communication needs, simple descriptions and narratives, (2) participate with an educated Arab in simple conversations on familiar topics, (3) read and comprehend street signs, lists of items dealing with personal and social needs and short printed simple passages, (4) fill out simple forms, supply biographical information and write messages, notes and short paragraphs, and (5) develop awareness of Arab cultural behavior and social expressions. Class meets four hours a week. Students' evaluation is based on class participation, weekly quizzes, monthly tests, and a final exam. Textbook: (1) Elementary Modern Standard Arabic, Part Two (Lessons 31-45); and (2) a course pack including supplementary materials and activities. (Kalliel)

Literature, Civilization, and Advanced Language Courses

413. Egyptian Colloquial Arabic. Arab. 202 or 232; or permission of instructor. (3). (LR).

This course teaches the basic principles of pronunciation and grammar of colloquial Egyptian Arabic through oral and pattern practice drill. Towards the end of the course emphasis shifts to practical use of the dialect based on expanded vocabulary and texts containing more cultural and idiomatic content than the first lessons. This course is recommended for students who plan to travel or to work in Egypt and those who need Arabic for immediate oral use. The grade is based on classroom performance, assignments, monthly tests, and the final examination. The course is accompanied by tape recordings of the pronunciation drills, the basic texts, the vocabulary, the conversations and the listening comprehension selections. In addition, it is taught by a native speaker of the dialect. Texts: there will be a course pack. (Wahba)

414. Egyptian Colloquial Arabic. Arab. 413 or permission of instructor. (3). (LR).

This is a continuation of Arabic 413. In Arabic 413 the basic principles of pronunciation and grammar are emphasized through oral and pattern practice drills. In Arabic 414 the emphasis shifts to practical use of the dialect based on expanded vocabulary and texts containing more cultural and idiomatic content than the texts taught in the previous semester. The course is accompanied by tape recordings of the pronunciation drills, the basic texts, the vocabulary, the conversations and the listening comprehension selections. Regular use of the language laboratory is required to reinforce class work and also to do the assignments which need to be recorded. The course grade is based on classroom performance, assignments, tests, and the final examination. Texts: there will be a course pack. (Wahba)

Iranian Studies (Iranian: Division 398)

Elementary and Intermediate Language Courses

201. Elementary Persian. (4). (LR).

Persian has been called the French of the Near/Middle East. Certainly, Persia/Iran has been in the news. Persian is an Indo-European language, related to English, etc. Its literature, as in other arts, is a major part of Near/Middle Eastern and Muslim tradition. Persian 201 is the first term of a four term sequence. It takes the student through to the basic mastery of the skills of reading and writing, and of comprehension and speaking. Cultural as well as communicative skills are emphasized. By the end of the term the student should be well versed in these skills. Individual student by the instructor to polish and improve the student's Persian language skills. The objective is language use. Students who have special needs, such as those acquiring the knowledge of Persian for reading purposes, only, or for communicative skills, only, will be given special attention, and special sessions. Similarly, students of Iranian heritage, who may know some Persian in its colloquial form, will find the linguistic and cultural content of this course stimulating.

202. Elementary Persian. (4). (LR).

This course is the natural continuation of Elementary Persian 201. The emphasis will be on the use of the language in real-life situations, i.e., conversations and narratives, oral and written, on such topics as language and nationality, family, shopping, emergencies. etc. Oral and written drills, and the use of the language laboratory accompany the dialogs and compositions. By the end of the term the student should have acquired an adequate knowledge of all major points of Persian grammar with an active vocabulary of about 1000 items, should be able to read simple texts and to write short passages on simple topics. Grading will be based on attendance, homework, tests and the final examination. Incoming students may join the class pending examination and approval by the instructor.

401. Intermediate Persian. Iranian 202 or equivalent. (4). (LR).

Persian has been called the French of the Near/Middle East. It is an Indo-European language, related to English, etc. Lack, or partial lack, of the knowledge of the monumental historical achievements of Iran is not only due to inadequate coverage by the media, but also to first and second generation Iranians' failure to inform their children. This course invites students with interest in world affairs, and those children, and emphasizes not only language, but culture. Iranian Studies 401 continues 201/202. Its objective is to lead the student to the improved mastery of the four language skills, viz. comprehension, reading, and speaking and writing. During the course, the student will learn higher levels of language registers, will be exposed to samples of Persian patterns of communicative skills via dialog, samples of expository prose, and of literature. Emphasis is on the use of Persian in these four skills. In addition, multi-media exposure, including video and news material via SCOLA and other means are utilized. Persian is the language of the class, with occasional discussions of linguistic matters in English. Cost:1 WL:1 (Windfuhr)

Turkish Studies (Turkish: Division 493)

Elementary and Intermediate Language Courses

202. Elementary Turkish. Turkish 201 or equivalent. (4). (LR).

This course is the sequel to Turkish 201 and is the second half of Elementary Turkish. We will focus on speaking and writing the language of Modern Turkey. Course topics include the phonological structure of Turkish, basic sentence patterns, and basic vocabulary. The aural-oral approach is emphasized and serves as the basic course format. There are tapes which accompany the text, Turkish for Foreigners. Student evaluation is based on written and oral quizzes, and a final examination. Cost:1 WL:3

401. Intermediate Turkish. Turkish 202 or equivalent. (4). (LR).

The course is designed for students who have completed either Turkish 202 or its equivalent as determined by the instructor. It emphasizes further study of Turkish grammar and stresses development of comprehension, and oral and written expression through the use of selected materials relating to Turkish culture and collected in a course pack. A strongly recommended text for the course is G.L. Lewis' TURKISH GRAMMAR (Oxford University Press, 1967 or later editions). Student evaluation is based on class performance, written work, a midterm and a final examination. Cost:1 WL:3 (Stewart-Robinson)

402. Intermediate Turkish. Turkish 401 or equivalent. (4). (LR).

Part of the departmental sequence in Modern Turkish. The course is designed for students who have completed Turkish 202 or its equivalent as determined by the instructor. It provides further study of Turkish grammar, vocabulary and pronunciation. Comprehension and oral and written expression will be developed through translations and compositions. Readings will be emphasized. Evaluation will be determined on the basis of class quizzes and performance, a midterm and final examination. Books cost $20.00 if not already purchased for fall term. (Stewart-Robinson)


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