Courses in Psychology (Division 455)

The Department of Psychology offers two regular introductory courses: Psychology 111 and Psychology 112. Psychology 112 is offered as a natural science and stresses experimental psychology; Psychology 111 is approved for social science distribution but treats both perspectives with about equal weight. Students may not receive credit for Psychology 111 and Psychology 112. Either of the two courses meets the prerequisite requirement for concentration and serves as a prerequisite for advanced courses.

Honors students and others with permission of the instructor may take Psychology 114 or 115. Psychology 115 is offered as a natural science course and stresses experimental The Department of Psychology offers two regular introductory courses: Psychology 111 and Psychology 112. Psychology 112 is offered as a natural science and stresses experimental psychology; Psychology 111 is approved for social science distribution but treats both perspectives with about equal weight. Students may not receive credit for Psychology 111 and Psychology 112. Either of the two courses meets the prerequisite requirement for concentration and serves as a prerequisite for advanced courses. Honors students and others with permission of the instructor may take Psychology 114 or 115. Psychology 115 is offered as a natural science course and stresses experimental psychology. In Psychology 114 the coverage of basic material is rapid, leaving some time for specialized topics.

111(172). Introduction to Psychology. Psych. 111 serves, as do Psych. 112 or 113, as a prerequisite for advanced courses in the department and as a prerequisite to concentration. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112, 113, 114, or 115. Psych. 111 may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (4). (SS). Students in Psychology 111 are required to spend five hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects.

This course provides a broad introduction to the field of psychology. During the term we will cover such topics as perception, development, physiology and behavior, personality, and social psychology. In addition, we will look at some of the metaphors and principles that have guided research and theory within psychology (e.g., the mind as computer; the role of the unconscious; the person as pleasure seeking; the role of nature and nurture). Grades are based on three exams and assignments in discussion sections. Cost:2

112(170). Introduction to Psychology as a Natural Science. Credit is granted for both Psych. 112 and 113; no credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 111, 114, or 115. Psych. 112 may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (4). (NS). (BS). Students in Psychology 112 are required to spend five hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects.

This course provides a broad introduction to the content and methods of contemporary psychology, with an emphasis on natural science approaches to the study of human behavior. Topics include the neural and hormonal bases of behavior, genetics and evolution, drug action, sensation, perception, learning, memory, cognition, intelligence, motivation, emotion, social behavior, and abnormal psychology. Grade will be based on two exams, four quizzes, three short written assignments, a short research paper, and class participation. Cost:3 WL:5 (P.Price)

303(503). Special Problems in Psychology: Advanced Laboratory. One of the following: Psych. 330, 340, 350, 360, 370, 380, or 390. (2-4). (Excl).
Section 101 Community-Based Research. (3).
This course will cover research methodologies that are useful in understanding how communities function. These include community needs assessment, analysis of census and other statistical information on communities, evaluation of programs offered by community organizations, and surveys of community residents. Through readings, lectures, and discussion, the class will consider what is involved in each of these methods and when each is appropriate for studies of communities. Students will use one of these methodologies to carry out a research project in either an African American or Latino community in Detroit. Requirements include readings, lectures, and a write-up of the research project. Note that Psychology 305 is part of a community psychology program for spring term that includes two other courses as well: Psychology 470, Introduction to Community Psychology (Empowering African American and Latino Communities), for 3 credits, and Psychology 305, Practicum in Psychology, for 2-3 credits. Students may enroll for the whole program (8-9 credits), or for any part of it.

305. Practicum in Psychology. Introductory psychology. A total of 6 credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. (3-4). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of 6 credits.
Section 101. Field Work in African-American Communities (2-3 credits).
and Section 102. Field Work in Latino Communities (2-3 credits).

This course will be a field course involving two visits per week to either an African American community in Detroit or to a Southwest Detroit Latino community. Students will be assigned to community-based organizations who work with families and children or to schools for specific practicum experiences. The times will be arranged but will likely to be M, W, or F afternoons. Transportation will be provided. Students will also seminar once a week to integrate theory with practice. That seminar time will also be arranged, probably in the evenings. Note: Psychology 305 is part of a community psychology program for spring term that includes two other courses as well: Psychology 470, Introduction to Community Psychology (Empowering African American and Latino Communities), for 3 credits, Psychology 303, Community-Based Research, for 3 credits. Students may enroll for the whole program (8-9 credits), or for any part of it. (Barbarin, Gutierrez, and Jose-Kampfner)

Section 102 Community Issues in Latino/Latina Schools. The purpose of the proposed course is first, to expose students to Latino youth and their Southwest Detroit community (a poor multi-ethnic neighborhood); second, to educate students about cultural aspects of human development, mental health and contrasting theoretical approaches to social change; finally, to help the students analyze their practical experience using this theoretical framework. The overall goals of the course are to educate students to be able to envision themselves working in an urban community setting and to become motivated to work for social change in their academic and professional careers. This course will be a field course involving two visits per week to Southwest Detroit community. A neighborhood school, Earhart Middle School, will be used as the site for tutoring and working with the children. In this course, the instructors themselves will supervise the field experience. Neighborhood walks will be planned and led by the instructors to make students aware of the cultural diversity of the neighborhood, its economic base, and its interesting history. (Jose/Gutierrez)

307. Directed Experiences with Children. Introductory psychology and permission of instructor. A total of 6 credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. (3-4). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of 7 credits.
Section 101 Working with Children.
Directed experience with children aged eighteen months to five years at the University of Michigan's Children Center and Children's Center for Working Families for approximately eight to twelve hours per week on a regular basis. Seminar relating theoretical issues to applied practice is held every two weeks. No prerequisites required. Course is intended to introduce students to children in a child care setting. Cost:1 WL:5, Permission of instructor required for all students (Sternberg)

330(331). Introduction to Biopsychology. Introductory psychology. (3). (NS). (BS).

This course will examine the physiological basis of behavior in humans and non-human animals. We will learn about the cellular components of the brain that process information. We will see how the brain integrates sensory information from the environment and internal sources to regulate physiological processes and produce behavior. By comparing the behavior of various species, we will begin to get an idea of how genetics can also play a role in the evolution and expression of behavior. By learning about the anatomy of the brain and the basic processes through which the neurons in the brain communicate, we will also be learning why brain injuries result in certain deficits and how drugs produce their effects. The brain is an amazing organ, and we are just beginning to learn how complex processes such as language, learning and memory, or cognition are produced in the brain. Students must register for the lecture and one discussion/practicum session. NOTE: This course is intended for second term freshmen and sophomores. Psych. 330 will be the prerequisite for most upper-level Biopsychology courses. Cost:2 WL:1 (Bazzett)

341(310). Superlab in Psychology as a Natural Science. Psych. 330 or 340. (4). (NS). (BS). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

This course fulfills one of the advanced laboratory requirements in Psychology. It is designed to acquaint psychology concentrators with a wide range of methods and topics applicable to the scientific study of behavior. The general objectives of the course are to learn why people do psychology research, to understand the logic of experimentation, to gain experience of experimentation, to learn to critically evaluate research findings. The performance objectives of the course are to be able to construct and carry out an experiment to test a given hypothesis, to be able to analyze the data from an experiment, to be able to present the experiment and its results in a clear, concise manner, and to be able to clearly communicate ideas in written form. Experimental methods are demonstrated using examples from vision and perception, pattern recognition, memory systems, language, problem solving, and decision making. Grading is based on exams and reports of three experiments conducted by students. Prerequisite: Psych 111 or 114. Cost:2 WL:1 (Seifert)

351(517). Advanced Laboratory in Developmental Psychology. Stat. 402 and Psych. 350. (3). (Excl). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.
Section 101.
This course provides training in the skills necessary to critique and conduct research on children's perceptual, cognitive, social, and emotional development. This is a laboratory course: students engage in the design, data collection, analysis, and write-up of developmental psychological research. In addition, there are lectures and discussions covering theories, research issues, methods, and actual studies in developmental psychology. Evaluation is based primarily on participation in research projects and written reports and exercises. Cost:3 WL:1

361. Advanced Laboratory in Organizational Psychology. Psych. 360. (4). (Excl). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

This advanced laboratory will cover several approaches to enhancing individual, group, and organizational effectiveness. We will focus on role analysis and negotiation, competencies of an effective consultant, impression management, group planning and decision making, diversity in workforce, and work redesign. The instructor will introduce each topic to the class members by giving a brief overview of the framework, lecture or workshop to provide some firsthand experience with the concepts and phenomena we are studying. Subsequently, the class will reflect on the presentation and discuss relevant readings, processes and assignments. Finally, students (individually and in groups) will conduct field research projects, deliver class presentations and complete written reports which will then be delineated in class. Cost:3 WL:1 (Beale)

370. Introduction to Psychopathology. Introductory psychology. (3). (SS).

This course will provide an overview of abnormal psychology, focusing on the assessment and diagnosis of psychiatric disorders. We will also explore several explanatory systems (psychodynamic, behavioral/cognitive behavioral and biopsychological) that offer accounts of the etiology of these disorders and provide treatment strategies. The readings for this course will include clinical case studies, theoretical essays and empirical research papers. Course requirements include: attendance at lecture, course readings, in-class examinations, and short papers. (Hansell)

372(415). Advanced Laboratory in Psychopathology. Psych. 370. (3). (Excl). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

This course is designed to introduce students to various methods of clinical inference and research relevant to the construction and study of dynamic theories of psychopathology, related psychodiagnostic methods, and psychotherapeutic interventions.

390(452). Introduction to the Psychology of Personality. Introductory psychology. (3). (SS).

This course provides a broad survey of personality psychology, focusing on three levels of analysis: human nature, sex differences, and individual differences. These levels are examined from several theoretical perspectives, including evolutionary, psychoanalytic, motivational, cognitive, phenomenological, interactional, and dispositional. Emphasis will be placed on the interaction between internal personality characteristics and the social context within which individuals operate. Lectures and readings include a balance of theory and research. The course includes two lectures per week. (Buss)

400. Special Problems in Psychology as a Natural Science. Introductory psychology. Only 6 credits of Psych. 400, 401, 402 and 500, 501, 502 combined may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology, and a maximum of 12 credits may be counted toward graduation. (2-4). (Excl). (BS). May be repeated for credit.
Section 101 Statistics in Psychology. (Satisfies psychology concentration statistics requirement).
The objective of this course is to introduce the concepts and applications of some basic statistical methods and data analysis. The course emphasis is on developing intuitions about, and reasoning with statistics. No more than high school algebra is required. There are two lectures and two computer laboratory sections each week. The course is lab-oriented, emphasizing hands-on problem solving. Excel and Word are used extensively to analyze data and write up reports (No prior experience with these packages is assumed). Participation in this course will satisfy the psychology department's statistics requirement. Course evaluation is based on weekly assignments, an in class midterm, and a final project. Cost:2 or 3 WL:4 (Sieck)

470(372). Introduction to Community Psychology. Introductory psychology. (3). (SS).
Section 101 Empowering Families and Communities: African American Communities. (3 credits).
Section 102 Empowering Families and Communities: Latino Communities. (3 credits).


A primary goal of this course is to apply principles of community psychology to help understand how ethnic families and communities empower themselves to address their concerns for the well-being of their children. Through readings, discussions, and on-site experiences with parent groups, schools, and community organizations in Detroit, the class will consider how communities define threats to children's welfare and how communities respond to those threats. Lectures, readings, and discussions will focus on principles of community psychology, urban communities in Detroit, their histories and their structures. Through discussion and written assignments, the class will consider issues critical to the future of urban communities. Do culture and ethnicity influence community structures and problem-solving styles? What factors contribute to community effectiveness and efficacy of community members in solving problems related to children and youth? Are there ways to reduce inter-ethnic conflict, competition for resources, inter-group prejudice and to enhance coalition building and co=operation? Course requirements include readings, lectures, and three papers focused on the city of Detroit. Note that sections 101 and 102 of Psychology 470 are related. They will meet jointly several times over the course of the term to discuss similarities and differences in Latino and African American communities. Also note that sections 101 and 102 of Psychology 470 are part of a community psychology program for spring term that includes two other courses as well: Psychology 303, Community-Based Research, for 3 credits, and Psychology 305, Practicum in Psychology, for 2-3 credits. Students may enroll for the whole program (8-9 credits), or for any part of it. (Barbarin, Gutierrez)

501. Special Problems in Psychology as a Social Science. Introductory Psychology. Only 6 credits of Psych. 400, 401, 402, 500, 501, and 502 may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology. (1-4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 12 credits.
Section 001 Psychosocial Perspectives on the Identities of Asian Pacific Americans. (3 credits).
In this course, we will take a comparative approach to examine how ethnicity, culture, class, gender, and community affect "identity" by looking at the diverse cultures of Asian Pacific Americans (South Asians, East Asians, Southeast Asians, and Pacific Islanders.) We will explore topics of: acculturation and identity development; impact of positive and negative stereotypes; gender role conflicts; impact of racism on identity and personality; media images vs. reality; identities of APA lesbians and gay men; multiracial/multiethnic families; and individual and community interventions. Methods of instruction will include panel discussions, lectures, structured experiential exercises, film presentations, and group inquiry. Students will focus on a particular area of inquiry and work on an investigative project with other students. Each investigative team will share their findings with the class. Evaluations will be based on participation, exams, response papers, and final project papers and presentations. Cost:2 WL:2 (Motoike)

502. Special Problems in Psychology. Introductory Psychology. Only 6 credits of Psych. 400, 401, 402, 500, 501, and 502 may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology. (1-4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 12 credits.
Section 102 Practicum and Readings in Cognitive Neuroscience. (3 credits).
This course will meet three times a week for two hours. Once to discuss some readings on a particular method of cognitive neuroscience, once to take a field trip to a lab on campus that performs this kind of research and get some hands on experience, and once to discuss some particularly telling findings using this method. Students should be upper level psychology, biology, or pre-med students. Evaluation will rely heavily on student participation and also one test and one paper. Cost:1 (Lauber)

513(561)/Soc. 561. Survey Research Design. One elementary statistics course. (3). (Excl). (BS).
Section 101 Introduction to Statistical Research Design.
Research in the social sciences has increasingly come to rely on statistical concepts in the development and evaluation of research designs, as well as in the presentation and analysis of data. The application of a wide variety of research designs, including both experimental and non-experimental designs require the understanding of basic statistical concepts. This course provides a basic introduction to concepts of research design and statistical reasoning. Topics include: elements of study design, necessary mathematical operations, central tendency, dispersion and variance, sampling error, sampling distributions, standard errors, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, and analysis of variance. Cost:2 WL:3 (Yeaton)

514(562)/Soc. 562. Survey Research Data Collection. One elementary statistics course. (3). (Excl). (BS).
Section 101 Survey Design and Data Collection Mail and Telephone Techniques.
In the United States face-to-face interview surveys are conducted less frequently than are surveys using mailed self-administered questionnaires or telephone interviews. The choice of mode of data collection has large effects on the costs, administrative design, sampling, nonresponse, and measurement design of the survey. This course offers training in the practical aspects of conducting surveys by mail and telephone, as well as a review of methodological research on the two methods. The course covers issues of sampling, nonresponse reduction, questionnaire design, computer assisted telephone interviewing, and survey administration. The student will learn the strengths and weaknesses of the individual methods, as well as the feasibility of designs that combine the two methods in a single survey. Prerequisite: An introductory course in survey research methods or equivalent experience. (Dillman/Biemer/Mathiowetz)

Independent Study/Directed Reading

The department of psychology offers several options for independent study/directed reading.

204. Individual Research. & 206. Tutorial Reading. Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake individual research or plans of study under the direction of a member of the staff. Students are provided with the proper section number by the staff member with whom the work has been arranged. Students are responsible for properly registering for this course.

505. Individual Research and 507. Tutorial Reading. Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake individual research or plans of study under the direction of a member of the staff. Work in 505 must include the collection and analysis of data and a written report. Work in 507 provides an opportunity for further exploration of a topic of interest in Psychology. Faculty present a proposal for student work to the Department's Committee on Undergraduate Studies, which approves projects prior to registration.

The field practica courses (Psych 404, 405, and 409) offer an opportunity to integrate experiential and academic work within the context of a field setting. Students make their own arrangements to work in various community agencies and organizations; meet regularly with a faculty sponsor to discuss their experiences; read materials which are relevant to their experiences; and create some form of written product that draws experiences together at the end of the term. Obtain materials as early as possible as it generally takes students some time to meet requirements necessary to register for the course. An override from a Psychology Department faculty member is required to register. Credits do not count for the concentration although courses may be used for experiential labs. PSYCHOLOGY 409 IS RESERVED FOR RESEARCH PRACTICA. Field Practicums and Psych 505, 507 have prerequisites of one of the following: Psychology 330, 340, 350, 360, 370, 380, or 390; and permission of instructor. A combined total of 6 credits of Psych. 505 and 507 may be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

The following limitations apply to Experiential and Directed Reading/Independent Study credit:

  1. A maximum 15 credits of Experiential courses may be counted toward a degree; a maximum 8 credits may be earned from one project, and only one such Experiential project may be elected each term.
  2. A combined total 30 credits of Experiential and Directed Reading/Independent Study courses may be counted in the 120 credits required for a degree.
  3. Experiential and Independent courses are excluded from area distribution plans.

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