Asian Languages and Cultures

Note: The Department Waitlist policy for all courses is 1 - Get on the Waitlist through CRISP, and then attend the first class meeting. Policies and procedures for handling the waitlist will be explained there.

The Department of Asian Languages and Cultures offers intensive language instruction in Chinese and Japanese at the first-, second-, and third-year levels (Japanese 361, 362, 411; and Chinese 361, 362, 411, 421). These language courses are part of the Asian Summer Language Institute. They are officially listed as Summer Term courses, but PLEASE NOTE that they start several weeks before normal Summer Term courses (JUNE 10 to AUGUST 20). South and Southeast Asia courses 365, 369, 379, 370, and 374 will run from June 28 until August 20.

All students must apply for admission to the program. Contact the department at 764-8286 for more information.

Courses in Chinese (Division 339)

Language Courses

361. Intensive Beginning Chinese. Permission of instructor. (10). (LR).

An introductory course in modern spoken and written Mandarin Chinese. The course is aimed at the acquisition of basic structural skills through aural-oral exercises, carefully graded reading practice, and the use of videotapes. At the end of the course, students will have learned 350 characters and accompanying combinations. Students should practice with language tapes for two hours for each class hour. (Tao)

362. Intensive Second-Year Chinese. Chinese 102 or 361, and permission of instructor. (10). (LR).

A continuation of First-Year Chinese. The goals of this course are to achieve a basic level of reading competence with a vocabulary of 900 characters (plus combinations) and the continuing improvement of aural understanding and speaking competence. These goals are approached through classroom drill and recitation and out-of-class exercises.

411. Intensive Third-Year Chinese. Chinese 202 or 362 and permission of instructor. (10). (Excl).

A continuation of Second-Year Chinese. The four basic skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) continue to be stressed. Students will be expected to learn to read various styles of modern Chinese, including essays, documentary and journalistic materials, fiction, etc. Students will participate in discussions based on reading material. The class is conducted soley in Chinese. Knowledge of approximately 900 characters required. (Liang)

Literature Courses/Culture Courses

250. Undergraduate Seminar in Chinese Culture. No knowledge of Chinese language is required. (3). (HU). May be repeated with department permission.
Section 201 Images of China in Western Literature and Film.
No prerequisites. In this course we will read and view various depictions of China and Chinese people produced by Western observers. Selections will include excerpts from Travels of Marco Polo (14th c.), Pearl Buck's Pulitzer-prize-winning novel, The Good Earth (1931), and the 1987 Bernardo Bertolucci film The Last Emperor. We will be concerned with the images the Western outsider creates of the Chinese "Other," as well as with how and why he/she chooses to emphasize those particular images. Requirements will include short "journal-type" responses as preparation for class discussions, several short papers, including one "Book Review," and active class participation. (John)

Courses in Japanese (Division 401)

Language Courses

361. Intensive Beginning Japanese. Permission of instructor. (10). (LR).

A thorough grounding is given in all language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The oral component aims to provide the student with the speaking and comprehension skills necessary to function effectively in practical situations in a Japanese-speaking environment. Attention is given to the social and cultural differences in the use of the language. In the reading and writing component, the two kana syllabaries (katakana and hiragana ) and elementary characters (kanji ) are introduced.

362. Intensive Second-Year Japanese. Japanese 102 or 361, and permission of instructor. (10). (LR).

Further training in all the language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) for students who have acquired basic language proficiency. The reading and writing component emphasizes reading elementary texts, developing an expository style, and writing short answers or essays in response to questions about these texts. The social and cultural use of language is discussed.

411. Intensive Third-Year Japanese. Japanese 202 or 362, and permission of instructor. (10). (Excl).

Advanced training is given in all the langauge skills. Spoken Japanese is practiced in simulated Japanese social situations. A variety of selected modern texts (essays, fiction, and newspapers) are read with emphasis on expository style. The goal is to encourage students to become self-sufficient readers.

421. Intensive Introduction to Technical Japanese. Japanese 202, 362, or permission of instructor. A maximum of 10 credits may be elected through Japanese 421, 445, and 446. (10). (Excl).

Designed to help the Third-Year level student consolidate knowledge of basic Japanese grammar and syntax while learning the linguistic conventions of technological discourse. The first part of the course will cover grammar introduced in the last six lessons of Japanese: The Spoken Language, Part III. Students will then be gradually exposed to specialized discourse through written technical materials and spoken dialogues tailored to technical needs. Readings will generally come from a number of engineering fields. This course may be helpful to students in the sciences and in business administration who plan careers related to Japanese technology.

Literature Courses/Culture Courses

250. Undergraduate Seminar in Japanese Culture. No knowledge of Japanese language is required. (3). (HU). May be repeated with department permission.
Section 201 From Genji to Godzilla and Beyond: Japanese Popular Culture Now.
An introduction to Japanese culture that focuses on its diverse popular forms in the contemporary period while referring back to traditional sources for historical reference. We will engage in the viewing and discussion of actual artifacts from canonized cultural treasures like the Tale of the Genji to its popular rendition as a manga comic book; films - including anime; literature; karaoke; TV; and music with the purpose of understanding the cultural values, messages, and aesthetics of representation inscribed in them. Texts will be in English translation and explanations or subtitles will be provided for video or film clips, so no knowledge of Japanese is required. (Johnson)

Courses in South and Southeast Asia (S&SEA) (Division 483)

S&SEA Language Courses

365. Intensive Elementary Hindi-Urdu. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in S&SEA 106 or 315. Four credits granted to those who have completed S&SEA 105. (8). (Excl).

This course offers an introduction to spoken and written Hindi/Urdu, the major language in India and Pakistan. All major language skills - listening, speaking, reading, and writing are covered. The aim of achieving proficiency in speaking and comprehension is to enable the student to function effectively in different everyday situations in a native environment. Reading and writing are taught through frequent graded exercises. A standard textbook is used, supplemented by reference grammars and additional materials selected or specially prepared by the instructor. Recitation sections emphasize speaking and listening in native contexts at normal speed with near-native pronunciation, intonation, rhythm, and appropriate body language. Students learn to handle the scripts in which Hindi/Urdu is written.

369. Intensive Beginning Sanskrit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in S&SEA 110. Three credits granted to those who have completed S&SEA 109. (6). (Excl).

This is a six credit hour course and will meet 3 hours per day, five days a week, for seven weeks. We will use Sanskrit Primer, a textbook written by Professor Madhav Deshpande, which will be available as a course pack. We plan to cover approximately 32 lessons from this text, which gives substantial introduction to the basic grammar of Sanskrit. The course will introduce students to the Devanagari script and it will involve exercises, including translations both from and into Sanskrit. The students will also be introduced to reading materials appropriate for their level of grammar. There will be daily homework, weekly quizzes, and a final exam. (Deshpande)

370. Intensive Classical Punjabi. (8). (Excl).

This course is an introduction to the sacred language of the Sikhs (SLS). It gives students the skills necessary to read Sikh classical literature, particularly the Adi Granth, and prepares them to gain a knowledge of the original language of the Sikh scriptures. The students are expected to have an interest in and a concern for the teachings of Sikhism, but it is not assumed that they will necessarily possess any specialized linguistic knowledge. In fact, the course is intended for those who know neither the Gurmukhi script nor modern Punjabi. The aim is to teach the antique conventions of 17th century Gurmukhi spelling, which differs in some respects from modern Punjabi orthography. The lessons are designed to introduce the grammar of the language of the Sikh scriptures in a graded sequence, beginning with the simplest forms and constructions, then gradually working through the more complex ones. Each lesson concludes with a vocabulary of newly introduced words and scriptural passages, to be learnt by heart through oral recitation. Readings will include items from the various sections of the Sikh scripture. There will be two tests: a midterm worth 20% and a final worth 30%. In addition there will be homework assignments worth 30%. The remaining 20% of marks will be alloted to oral communication, dictation and instructor's own evaluation. (Singh)

379. Intensive Elementary Marathi. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in S&SEA 338. (8). (Excl).

This course offers an introduction to spoken and written Marathi, the major language in Maharashtra (western India). All major language skills listening, speaking, reading, and writing are covered. The aim of achieving proficiency in speaking and comprehension is to enable the student to function effectively in different everyday situations in a native environment. Reading and writing are taught through frequent graded exercises. A standard textbook is used, supplemented by reference grammars and additional materials selected or specially prepared by the instructor. Recitation sections emphasize speaking and listening in native contexts at normal speed with near-native pronunciation, intonation, rhythm, and appropriate body language. Students learn to handle the scripts in which Marathi is written.

374. Intensive Intermediate Tamil. S&SEA 373 or 114. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in S&SEA 214. (6). (Excl).

This course is a continuation of elementary Tamil 113-114 or any other equivalent course offered in other institutions. Students with prior knowledge of Tamil, either from a formal course or from living experience, can also join this course. See the instructor for placement. This course is designed to further students' skills in speaking and writing, as well as increase their proficiency in reading and comprehension. A standard textbook and handouts are used, supplemented by HyperCard Tamil software consisting of a sequence of graded dialogues chosen from daily conversations and Tamil movies. Evaluation is based on classroom performance, homework assignments, tests, and a final exam. (Renganathan)

Culture Courses

240. Topics in Asian Culture. (3). (HU).

This course will provide an opportunity for non-specialists to explore a particular area of Asian culture. It will give beginning students a background for the study of Asian topics, as well as special insight into the (literary) traditions, philosophies, and beliefs of different peoples within Asia. (Mehta)

Section 201 Yoga: Philosophy and Practice. An introduction to the theory and practice of India's greatest achievement in the area of physical, mental, and spiritual awareness. Topics include: psychology and philosophy of Yoga, postures, breathing practices, relaxation techniques, diet, concentration and meditation, Kundalini, Bhakti Yoga, and Karma Yoga (Ways of Devotion and
Social Action).


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