Romance Languages and Literatures

French, Italian, and Spanish Placement Tests

If you are planning to take an elementary French, Italian, or Spanish class and you are a new student, freshman or transfer student, or you have not yet begun the elementary language sequence on the Ann Arbor campus, you must take the placement test in order to register for the correct course. You must register for the class into which you have been placed.

If you have registered for a class prior to taking the test, you will still be required to take the test in order to verify that you are in the appropriate level class.

If you have already taken French, Italian, or Spanish 101-232 on the Ann Arbor campus, or if you have already taken the placement test once, you are not eligible to take the test again. For questions regarding the LS&A language requirement, please see a general academic advisor or call POINT-10 (764-6810).

Courses in French (Division 371)

Elementary Language Courses

Students who intend to continue a language begun in high school must take the Placement Test to determine the language course in which they should enroll. French 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction in high school. It is strongly recommended that students who began French at another college or university also take the placement test.

101. Elementary French. Students with any prior study of French must take the Placement Test. Credit is not granted for more than two courses from French 101, 102, and 103. (4). (LR).

See French 101 (Spring Term).

102. Elementary French, Continued. French 101 or equivalent. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 103. French 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level. College or university transfer students who have received credit for one term are encouraged to enroll in French 103. (4). (LR).

See French 101 (Spring Term). It is STRONGLY suggested that transfer students see H. Neu for advice regarding placement in the appropriate course.

231. Second-Year French. French 102, or 103, or equivalent; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

See French 231 (Spring Term).

232. Second-Year French, Continued. French 231 or equivalent; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

See French 232 (Spring Term).

Other Language Courses

111. First Special Reading Course. French 111 and 112 are designed for juniors, seniors, and graduate students interested in gaining a reading knowledge of the language. Completion of French 111-112 does not satisfy the LS&A language requirement. May not be elected for credit by undergraduates who have received credit for college French. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 101, 102, or 103. (4). (Excl).

This course is for undergraduate and graduate students who would like to gain a good reading knowledge of French in one term. The essentials of French grammar as well as vocabulary and idioms are presented for passive recognition, followed by translation and sight-reading exercises on materials taken from both humanities and sciences. The skills gained in the course should enable students to read technical writings of moderate difficulty. Toward the end of the term students select a short article or a chapter of a book in their field of interest for outside reading. Classes meet four times per week in sections of 25 students. There are weekly quizzes as well as course-wide midterm and final examinations.

Courses in Italian (Division 399)

Elementary Language Courses

101. Elementary Italian. (4). (LR).

See Italian 101 (Spring Term).

102. Elementary Italian. Italian 101. (4). (LR).

This course continues the presentation of the essentials of the Italian language and attempts to broaden the student's knowledge of Italian life and culture. Conversation in the language is also emphasized. The course covers the second half of the text with workbook and lab manual; readings supplement this set of texts. Course topics include a continuation of Italian grammar; use of idiomatic expression; the culture, geography, and everyday life of Italy; and conversation topics that encourage discussion. A variety of instructional methods are used: grammar presentation and exercises, readings in Italian (dialogues, short articles, Italian newspapers, and magazines), original writing and oral discussion. Grading is based on class participation, quizzes, midterm, and a final examination.

231. Second-Year Italian. Italian 102; or permission of course supervisor. No credit granted to those who have completed 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

This course reviews grammar, introduces students to standard modern Italian through the reading of short stories, plays, and poetry, and increases student facility in writing and speaking Italian. Text, workbook, and lab manual required. Compositions are required and are based upon reading or other topics of interest. Class discussions and oral report center on readings or current events. Grading is based on class participation, compositions, quizzes, a midterm, and a final examination.

232. Second-Year Italian, Continued. Italian 231 or permission of course supervisor. No credit granted to those who have completed 112. (4). (LR).

This course aims at a further development of each student's reading and speaking knowledge of Italian, including increased facility in both conversation and oral comprehension. Text, workbook, and lab manual required. There is a continuing review of grammar, and the elements of composition. Various genres of literature are read and discussed, and occasional short papers are required on these or other related topics. Oral reports on various topics are also required. Grading is based on short papers, class participation, quizzes, a midterm, and a final examination.

Courses Taught in English Translation (without language prerequisites)

380. Italian Cinema and Society. A knowledge of Italian is not required. (HU). Laboratory fee ($10) required.

The course, which will be taught in English, traces the historical development of Italian cinema from the postwar advent of neorealism to the mid-1980s. The course has several aims: to understand the political, economic, and cultural contexts which generated and supported the neorealist movement; to explore and analyze the theoretical bases of neorealism and its reception, both friendly and hostile, in Italian intellectual/political circles; to examine various aspects of the movement beyond neorealism proper in films of the 1950s and 1960s by Fellini, Visconti, Olmi, Bertolucci, and Bellocchio; and to expose the rethinking and reevaluation of the neorealist aesthetic as carried out by Scola, the Taviani Brothers, Nichetti and Salvatores in the 1970s and 1980s. The course requirements, beyond class participation, will be three 6-8 page papers. A knowledge of Italian is useful, but is not required.

Other Language and Literature Courses

361. Intermediate Italian. Italian 232. (3). (Excl).

All the basic skills of the language will receive attention in this course, the primary goal of which is the improvement and refinement of oral, reading, and writing proficiency. Review of difficult points of grammar will be taken up when necessary, but the major concentration will be on class discussion of short articles, short fiction and poetry to polemic essays on contemporary cultural, political and social topics. Short essays will be part of the regular assignments, as will occasional prepared oral presentations, and translations. The variety of the materials covered will be as broad as possible to introduce students to the several different writing styles and manner of presentation of the language. The course will be conducted in Italian. (Habekovic)

362. Advanced Italian. Italian 361 or equivalent. (Excl).

Further proficiency in oral and writing skills will be stressed in Italian 362. Reading materials will include short fiction and non-fiction, as well as lengthier assignments of outside reading on which various written and oral assignments will be made. Participation in class discussions, occasional oral presentations, weekly compositions based for the most part on assigned readings, the subject matter of which will deal primarily with subjects of topical interest. Continuing grammar difficulties will be treated as they arise. The course will be conducted in Italian.

Courses in Spanish (Division 484)

Elementary Language Courses

Students who intend to continue a language begun in high school are given a placement test to determine the course level at which they will start their college language instruction. Students must check with the Program Director for any exceptions to the Placement Test level.

101. Elementary Spanish. (4). (LR).

See Spanish 101 (Spring Term).

102. Elementary Spanish, Continued. Spanish 101. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 103. Spanish 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level. Open only to students who have completed 101 at the University of Michigan. College or university transfer students who have received credit for one term are encouraged to enroll in Spanish 103. (4). (LR).

See Spanish 102 (Spring Term).

231. Second-Year Spanish. Spanish 102, or 103, or the equivalent; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

See Spanish 231 (Spring Term).

232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued. Spanish 231 or the equivalent; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 112. (4). (LR).

See Spanish 232 (Spring Term).

Special Elementary Reading Courses

Spanish 111 and 112 are designed for juniors, seniors, and graduate students interested in gaining a reading knowledge of the language.

111. First Special Reading Course. May not be elected for credit by undergraduates who have already received credit for high school or college Spanish. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 101, 102, or 103. (4). (Excl).

Spanish 111 is designed for students interested mainly in the acquisition of a reading knowledge of the language. It is open to graduates, juniors, and seniors; and to others by special permission. No prerequisite.


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