Asian Languages and Cultures

Spring 1997


Note: The Department Waitlist policy for all courses is 2 Go to the department office to get on a waitlist, and then attend the first class meeting. Policies and procedures for handling the waitlist will be explained there.

The Department of Asian Languages and Cultures offers intensive language instruction in Chinese and Japanese at the first-, second-, and third-year levels (Japanese 361, 362, 411, 421; and Chinese 361, 362, 411) and also offers Korean at the first-year level (Korean 361). These language courses are part of the Asian Summer Language Institute. They are officially listed as Summer Term courses, but PLEASE NOTE that they start several weeks before normal Summer Term courses (JUNE 9 to AUGUST 15). South and Southeast Asia courses 365, 366, 369, 373, and 374 will run from June 26 until August 19.

See Summer Term section of this Course Guide for course descriptions. All students must apply for admission to the program. Contact the department at 936-3915 for more information.


Courses in Asian Studies (Division 323)

122/Hist. 122. Modern Transformation of East Asia. (3). (SS).

See History 122. (Young)


Courses in Chinese (Division 339)

Culture Courses/Literature Courses

250. Undergraduate Seminar in Chinese Culture. No knowledge of Chinese language is required. (3). (HU). May be repeated with department permission.
Section 101 Longing for Love, Crying for Justice: Complaining Women In Chinese Literature in Translation.
This introductory course will approach women's voices in the Chinese literary tradition specifically through the voices of complaining women. In early and medieval poetry, women often appear in the throes of grief over separation from or abandonment by a lover, to which their response is either reproachful complaint, or a listless ennui; the legacy of this strand can be detected even in 20th-century literature. But women are also depicted in various genres complaining of injustices against themselves or their families, including arranged marriage, rape, unjust courts, exclusion from male privilege, and so on. Using English translations of lyric and narrative poetry, short stories, longer fictional works and drama, by male and female authors, this course will explore the dynamics of the voices given to or asserted by women in this centuries-long literary tradition, by exploring their range in various types of complaints. We will be particularly interested in the conventional voices assigned to women by male writers, and in women's literary responses to those voices. Course requirements will include active participation in class discussion, occasional reading responses, and three short papers. No previous knowledge of Chinese or Chinese literature is expected. (Samei)


Courses in Japanese (Division 401)

Culture Courses/Literature Courses

250. Undergraduate Seminar in Japanese Culture. No knowledge of Japanese language is required. (3). (HU). May be repeated with department permission.
Section 101 Modern Japan in Fiction and Film.
Even as Japan has embraced Western technological advances over the last 130 years and more, the country has struggled to maintain its cultural traditions and so-called `spiritual essence.' But the lines between culture and technology, Japanese and non-Japanese, tradition and modernity have proven unstable, leading, at one extreme, to proposals to adopt French or English as the national language, and on the other, to the development of an infamous rhetoric of socio-cultural homogeneity. Through analysis of novels and in-class movies by some of Japan's best-known modern writers and directors, we will critique dominant and subversive expressions of Japanese identity and nationality. Students will be introduced to such literary concepts as representation, irony, voice, perspective, and narrating situation as an aid to formulating their arguments for class discussion and three short papers. All readings are in English; films are subtitled. (Selden)


Courses in South and Southeast Asia (S&SEA) (Division 483)

Culture Courses

225/Rel. 225. Hinduism. (3). (HU).

Hinduism is a major world religion practiced by over a billion people, primarily in South Asia, but it also was the precursor of Buddhism, and along with Buddhism it had a major impact on the civilizations in East and Southeast Asia. We will cover its origins and development, its literature, its belief and practices, its unique social structures and doctrines, its interactions with other religions, and finally its confrontation with and accommodation of "modernity." We will use reading materials, lectures, discussions, and audio and video resources. Students will be expected to read selections from Hindu religious literature in translation as well as read modern studies of the various aspects of Hindu beliefs, practices, social systems, et cetera. The overall approach will be more in the direction of a general history of this religion and the people who adhere to it. Students will be graded on the basis of a set of in-class written exams as well as term papers. (Young)

240. Topics in Asian Culture. (3). (HU).
Section 101 Yoga: Philosophy and Practice.
An introduction to the theory and practice of India's greatest achievement in the area of physical, mental, and spiritual awareness. Topics include: psychology and philosophy of Yoga, postures, breathing practices, relaxation techniques, diet, concentration and meditation, Kundalini, Bhakti Yoga, and Karma Yoga (Ways of Devotion and Social Action). (Mehta)


Summer 1997

Note: The Department Waitlist policy for all courses is 2 - Go to the department office to get on a waitlist, and then attend the first class meeting. Policies and procedures for handling the waitlist will be explained there.

The Department of Asian Languages and Cultures offers intensive language instruction in Chinese and Japanese at the first-, second-, and third-year levels (Japanese 361, 362, 411, 421; and Chinese 361, 362, 411) and also offers Korean at the first-year level (Korean 361). These language courses are part of the Asian Summer Language Institute. They are officially listed as Summer Term courses, but PLEASE NOTE that they start several weeks before normal Summer Term courses (JUNE 9 to AUGUST 15). South and Southeast Asia courses 365, 366, 369, 373, and 374 will run from June 26 until August 19. Contact the department office for an application and information at 936-3915.


Courses in Buddhist Studies (Division 332)

250. Undergraduate Seminar in Buddhist Studies. No knowledge of an Asian language required. (3). (HU). May be repeated with department permission.
Section 201 Tibetan Buddhist Approaches to Death.
Beginning with a brief look at some of the basic philosophical concepts of Buddhism, this course will examine how Tibet has turned the act of dying towards the realization of these concepts. The transitional state between birth and death is viewed as a rare opportunity for transformation. Readings will cover: how this transformation is to be enacted; how the Buddhist practitioner prepares for this crucial moment through tantric meditation practices; and how funerary rituals work to assist the dead to this end. In addition we will examine how the West's fascination with the Tibetan Book of the Dead has lead to many creative interpretations of this obscure text. (Dalton)


Courses in Chinese (Division 339)

Language Courses

361. Intensive Beginning Chinese. Permission of instructor. (10). (LR).

An introductory course in modern spoken and written Mandarin Chinese. The course is aimed at the acquisition of basic structural skills through aural-oral exercises, carefully graded reading practice, and the use of videotapes. At the end of the course, students will have learned 350 characters and accompanying combinations. Students should practice with language tapes for two hours for each class hour. This course is part of the Asian Summer Language Institute which runs from June 9 August 15, 1997. Application is required; if you are interested please contact the department in 3070 Frieze Building. (Tao)

362. Intensive Second-Year Chinese. Chinese 102 or 361, and permission of instructor. (10). (LR).

A continuation of First-Year Chinese. The goals of this course are to achieve a basic level of reading competence with a vocabulary of 900 characters (plus combinations) and the continuing improvement of aural understanding and speaking competence. These goals are approached through classroom drill and recitation and out-of-class exercises. This course is part of the Asian Summer Language Institute which runs from June 9 August 15, 1997. Application is required; if you are interested please contact the department in 3070 Frieze Building.

411. Intensive Third-Year Chinese. Chinese 202 or 362 and permission of instructor. (10). (Excl).

A continuation of Second-Year Chinese. The four basic skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) continue to be stressed. Students will be expected to learn to read various styles of modern Chinese, including essays, documentary and journalistic materials, fiction, etc. Students will participate in discussions based on the reading material. The class is conducted solely in Chinese. This course is part of the Asian Summer Language Institute which runs from June 9 August 15, 1997. Application is required; if you are interested please contact the department in 3070 Frieze Building.


Courses in Japanese (Division 401)

Culture Courses/Literature Courses

250. Undergraduate Seminar in Japanese Culture. No knowledge of Japanese language is required. (3). (HU). May be repeated with department permission.
Section 201 Literature of Resistance: Early Twentieth Century Japanese Literature.
This class investigates the category of "literature" and the question of resistance within it or to it in the particular historical circumstances of early twentieth century Japan. We will read canonical novels (Broken Commandment, The Quilt) and fiction from outside the canon (women's writing, proletarian writing) as well as literary theory and history. We will ask ourselves how "literature" as a category is formed and what invisible boundaries/assumptions inform it. If literature is a constructed category, what would resistance to it mean? (Bowen-Struyk)

Language Courses

361. Intensive Beginning Japanese. Permission of instructor. (10). (LR).

A thorough grounding is given in all the language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The oral component aims to provide the students with the speaking and comprehension skills necessary to function effectively in practical situations in a Japanese-speaking environment. Attention is given to the social and cultural differences in the use of the language. In the reading and writing component, the two kana syllabaries (katakana and hiragana) and elementary characters (kanji) are introduced. This course is part of the Asian Summer Language Institute which runs from June 9 August 15, 1997. Application is required; if you are interested please contact the department in 3070 Frieze Building.

362. Intensive Second-Year Japanese. Japanese 102 or 361, and permission of instructor. (10). (LR).

Further training in all the language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) for students who have acquired basic language proficiency. The reading and writing component emphasizes reading elementary texts, developing an expository style, and writing short answers or essays in response to questions about these texts. The social and cultural use of language is discussed. This course is part of the Asian Summer Language Institute which runs from June 9 August 15, 1997. Application is required; if you are interested please contact the department in 3070 Frieze Building.

411. Intensive Third-Year Japanese. Japanese 202 or 362, and permission of instructor. (10). (Excl).

Advanced training is given in all the language skills. Spoken Japanese is practiced in simulated Japanese social situations. A variety of selected modern texts (essays, fiction, and newspapers) are read with emphasis on expository style. The goal is to encourage students to become self-sufficient readers. This course is part of the Asian Summer Language Institute which runs from June 9 - August 15, 1997. Application is required; if you are interested please contact the department in 3070 Frieze Building.

421. Intensive Introduction to Technical Japanese. Japanese 202, 362, or permission of instructor. A maximum of 10 credits may be elected through Japanese 421, 445, and 446. (10). (Excl).

Designed to help the third-year level student consolidate knowledge of basic Japanese grammar and syntax while learning the linguistic conventions of technological discourse. The first part of the course will cover the grammar introduced in the last six lessons of Japanese: The Spoken Language: Part III. Students will then be gradually exposed to specialized discourse through written technical materials and spoken dialogues tailored to technical needs. Readings will generally come from a number of engineering fields. This course may be helpful to students in the sciences and in business administration who plan careers related to Japanese technology. This course is part of the Asian Summer Language Institute which runs from June 9 August 15, 1997. Application is required; if you are interested please contact the department in 3070 Frieze Building.


Courses in Korean (Division 409)

361. Intensive First-Year Korean. (10). (LR).

An introductory course for those who have no or minimal proficiency in Korean. This course is aimed at increasing the student's knowledge of the fundamental grammatical structures of Korean while learning to sustain control of basic conversation. By engaging in classroom discussion, group skits and viewing popular Korean movies, students will develop an understanding of the Korean language and culture. Students will have the opportunity to work with the College of Korean CD-ROM, a multi-media tutoring program, in the Language Resource Lab. Students are encouraged to visit the lab as much as they can and to meet with instructors for additional help. This course is part of the Asian Summer Language Institute which runs from June 9 August 15, 1997. Application is required; if you are interested please contact the department in 3070 Frieze Building


Courses in South and Southeast Asia (S&SEA) (Division 483)

S&SEA Language Courses

365. Intensive Elementary Hindi-Urdu. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in S&SEA 106 or 315. Four credits granted to those who have completed S&SEA 105. (8). (Excl).

In this course students are taught to speak and listen with normal speed, pronunciation, intonation, rhythm, and appropriate body language. This course is part of the Center for South and Southeast Asia's Summer Language Institute. Application is required; if you are interested please contact the Center in 130 Lane Hall, 240 South State Street.

366. Intensive Intermediate Hindi-Urdu. S&SEA 106 or 365. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in S&SEA 206 or 316. Four credits granted to those who have completed S&SEA 205. (8). (Excl).

This course develops beginning language skills by broadening conversational expertise, building vocabulary, and strengthening capacities to use more advanced grammatical constructions. Upon completion, students will be able to function effectively in everyday situations in a native environment. This course is part of the Center for South and Southeast Asia's Summer Language Institute. Application is required; if you are interested please contact the Center in 130 Lane Hall, 240 South State Street.

369. Intensive Beginning Sanskrit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in S&SEA 110. Three credits granted to those who have completed S&SEA 109. (6). (Excl).

In this course students will work toward developing mastery of the tools to read and write Sanskrit. Lessons include study of the script (Devanagari), elementary grammar, and vocabulary). This course is part of the Center for South and Southeast Asia's Summer Language Institute. Application is required; if you are interested please contact the Center in 130 Lane Hall, 240 South State Street.

373. Intensive Elementary Tamil. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in S&SEA 114. (8). (Excl).

In this course students are taught to speak and listen with normal speed, pronunciation, intonation, rhythm, and appropriate body language. This course is part of the Center for South and Southeast Asia's Summer Language Institute. Application is required; if you are interested please contact the Center in 130 Lane Hall, 240 South State Street.

374. Intensive Intermediate Tamil. S&SEA 373 or 114. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in S&SEA 214. (6). (Excl).

This course develops beginning language skills by broadening conversational expertise, building vocabulary, and strengthening capacities to use more advanced grammatical constructions. Upon completion, students will be able to function effectively in everyday situations in a native environment. This course is part of the Center for South and Southeast Asia's Summer Language Institute. Application is required; if you are interested please contact the Center in 130 Lane Hall, 240 South State Street.


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