Courses in History (Division 390)


Spring 1997

100-Level Courses are Survey Courses and Introductory Courses for Freshmen and Sophomores

110. Medieval, Renaissance, and Reformation Europe. (3). (SS).

What civilization did our European ancestors create? How did they render it so powerful? And why is it so different from its neighbors? This course, with lectures, slides, cinema, and class discussion, addresses these matters topically. You may expect to read and view a number of original sources (biographies, travel accounts, monumental art, and doodles) in order to study the rise and rivalry of Christianity and Islam; changing notions of the hero from swordsman to scientist; comparative treatments of minorities (Jews) and majorities (women); the relationship between church and state; the management of loyalty and love; shipping, printing, and technological superiority; why Columbus reached Japan and Galileo discovered Neptune; the relation between art and autobiography; and other topics that illustrate European history. There will be one hour examination in addition to the final. Cost:2 WL:4 (Lindner)

122/Asian Studies 122. Modern Transformation of East Asia. (3). (SS).

The course treats the modern experience of China, Japan, and Korea. We shall discuss comparatively the social and political orders in each country in their Asian context, before the advent of a powerful Western intrusion, and then explore the ways that these old civilizations handled the new calculus of power in the 19th and 20th centuries. We will attempt a broad look at the many sources of change and the varieties of their expression in the modern period. Topics will include reform and revolution, colonialism and liberation, racism directed both against and by Asians, the changing roles of women, and the economic transformation of recent decades. Readings will be drawn from historical narratives and translated expressions of East Asian voices. There will be a midterm exam, a term paper, and a final exam. Cost:2/3 WL:4 (Young)

161. United States, 1865 to the Present. (3). (SS).

This course is an undergraduate survey of American history from 1865 to the present. It examines the major social, political, and economic events that shaped America after the Civil War (Reconstruction, Industrialization, Progressivism, the New Deal, WWI and II, McCarthyism, Feminism, the Civil Rights Movement, the Turbulent Sixties, Great Society Liberalism, Reagan Republicanism, etc.). This survey acquaints students with the urban, labor, African-American, and women's history of this period through both primary and secondary sources. Students will attend lectures as well as discussion sections. Cost:3 (Thompson)

300-Level Courses and Above are for Juniors and Seniors

319. Europe Since 1945. (3). (SS).

The aim of this course is to provide a comprehensive critical introduction to European society, culture, and politics since the Second World War. Lectures and readings will cover both Eastern and Western Europe, the international arena and the national histories of particular countries, and social and cultural life as well as political developments. The course aims to explore the shaping of the contemporary world and to introduce students to societies and political cultures which are both structurally similar and fundamentally different from their own. Instruction will be via lectures and ad hoc discussion, evaluation via midterm exam and end-of-term essay. No special background is required; prejudices and preconceptions about European societies are enough. Cost:3-4 WL:4 (Eley)

368/Amer. Cult. 342/WS 360. History of the Family in the U.S. (3). (SS).
Section 101 History of the Family in the United States, 1880 to the Present.
This course aims to help students gain a perspective on the contemporary family by studying the development of this important institution in the American past. Particular emphasis will be placed on changing attitudes towards and experiences of sex roles, sexuality, childrearing, work patterns, and relationships between men, women, and children. We will explore: race, ethnicity, and class; cover economic developments as well as shifting conceptions of the role of the state; and ask about the impact of these factors on family life. We will want to examine how much the family has changed over time and try to project, on the basis of historical evidence, whither the family is going. Cost:2 WL:4 (Morantz-Sanchez)

393. Topics in U.S. and Latin American History. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.
Section 001 The Fabulous Fifties? A Re-examination of America in the 1950s.
Famous for Elvis, Eisenhower, the Beaver family and the Beats, the fifties are currently in vogue. This course will reexamine popular culture in the 1950s, and assess the decade. Some topics to be discussed are: Atomic Culture, Affluence and Anxiety; Poverty and the "Other America"; Eisenhower; Segregation and Civil Rights; The Beats; Rock n' Roll; Elvis, James Dean and Marilyn Monroe; TV; The Quiz Shows; Family Life; Suburbia; The Organization Man; The Feminine Mystique; the Silent Generation. We will also ask why the 1950s sowed the seeds of the more tumultuous 1960s. Finally, we will ask why are the 1950s viewed with nostalgia in the 1990s? (Palmieri)

394. Reading Course. Open only to history concentrators by written permission of instructor. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit only with permission of the Associate Chairman.

This is an independent 1-3 credit course open only to history concentrators by written permission of the instructor. It may be repeated for credit only with permission of the Associate Chairman.

397. History Colloquium. History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (3). (HU). May be elected for a total of 12 credits.
Section 101 Travel in History, Art and Cinema.
This is a seminar on the history of travel and exploration from the Columbian era to the present, based upon original accounts of travelers, on visual representations of travel, and on movies produced by explorers or "based" upon their exploits. About one third of the term focuses on the "discovery" of the Americas; we will choose other topics from the exploration of the American West, the Pacific basin, polar exploration, mountaineering, fraud and fictitious discovery, the rise of tourism, and the space frontier. Readings will come from the travelers themselves; art will include painting, maps, and original materials kept in the Clements Library; and the movies will include documentaries, "adventure" cinema, and a space "epic." Grades are based on class discussion and three short papers. (Lindner)

A course number in the 500s does not indicate a more difficult or advanced course than one in the 400s.

517. History of Ireland Since 1603. (3). (HU).

A narrative history of modern Ireland from the time of the collapse of Gaelic culture at the Tudor conquest until the present. Lectures will treat aspects of cultural and social as well as political history. The main texts will be Moody and Martin, The Course of Irish History, J.C. Beckett, The Making of Modern Ireland, and John A. Murphy, Ireland in the Twentieth Century. Course work will include a sequence of periodic brief quizzes, one term paper, a final examination. There is no course prerequisite and no prior knowledge of Ireland is required. Cost:2 WL:4 (McNamara)


Summer 1997

100-Level Courses are Survey Courses and Introductory Courses for Freshmen and Sophomores

111. Modern Europe. Hist. 110 is recommended as prerequisite. (3). (SS).

This course, which has no prerequisite, will introduce Europe since 1700. We shall look at the major revolutions of the period, the world wars of the eighteenth and twentieth centuries, such long-term processes as industrialization and urbanization, and particular aesthetic forms novel, photography, film that helped contemporaries understand those realities. We shall also, however, look at how Europe invaded much of the rest of the world in this era, and was in turn invaded by America. Finally, from first to last we will be concerned with memory, with how Europeans in 1914 or 1815 or 1700 used history as both a mirror to see themselves in and a map to their futures. The course is conducted in lectures and discussion. There will be a midterm and final exam. (Marwil)

300-Level Courses and Above are for Juniors and Seniors

365/CAAS 334/Amer. Cult. 336. Popular Culture in Contemporary Black America. (3). (HU).

See Afroamerican and African Studies 334. (Theoharis)

395. Reading Course. Open only to history concentrators by written permission of instructor. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit only with permission of the Associate Chairman.

This is an independent 1-3 hour course open only to history concentrators by written permission of the instructor. It may be repeated for credit only with permission of the Associate Chairman.

397. History Colloquium. History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (3). (HU). May be elected for a total of 12 credits.
Section 201 The History of African American Radicalism in the Postwar United States.
This course is an in-depth seminar on African American radicalism and the lives of key African American radicals from WWII to the present. We will analyze key radical movements such as the Civil Rights Movement in the South, and the Black Power movement in the urban North, etc. We will explore various ideologies and strategies of Black liberation such as integration, separatism, non-violence, self-defense, etc., as well as examine the historical roots of these ideologies. We will take a close look at the lives of such African American radicals as A. Philip Randolph, Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, Huey Newton, Assata Shakur, etc. This course will combine lectures and films with readings and discussions. (Thompson)


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