Courses in Computer Science
(Division 353)


Spring 1997

183/EECS 183. Elementary Programming Concepts. This course is not intended for computer science concentrators or computer engineering concentrators. (4). (NS). (BS).

Introduction to a high level programming language, top down analysis, and structured programming. Basic searching and sorting techniques. No previous experience in computers or programming is assumed. Students will write and debug several computer programs.

270/EECS 270. Introduction to Logic Design. CS 100. (4). (Excl). (BS).

Binary and non-binary systems, Boolean algebra digital design techniques, logic gates, logic minimization, standard combinational circuits, sequential circuits, flip-flops, synthesis of synchronous sequential circuits, PLA's, ROM's, RAM's, arithmetic circuits, computer-aided design. Laboratory includes hardware design and CAD experiments.

280/EECS 280. Programming and Introductory Data Structures. Math. 115 and CS 100. Two credits granted to those who have completed CS 283. (4). (NS). (BS).

Techniques and algorithm development and effective programming, top-down analysis, structured programming, testing, and program correctness. Program language syntax and static and run-time semantics. Scope, procedure instantiation, recursion, abstract data types, and parameter passing methods. Structured data types, pointers, linked data structures, stacks, queues, arrays, records, and trees.

284/EECS 284. Introduction to a Programming Language or System. Some programming knowledge is required. No credit granted for the C minicourse to those students who have completed CS 280. (Excl). (BS).

A mini course covering the fundamentals of a high level programming language or a system such as UNIX. Programming problems will be assigned. Specific languages or systems to be offered will be announced in advance. Credit will not be given for the C mini course to students who have taken EECS 280.

303/EECS 303. Discrete Structures. Math. 115. (4). (Excl). (BS).

Fundamental concepts of algebra; partially ordered sets, lattices, Boolean algebras, semigroups, rings, polynomial rings. Graphical representation of algebraic systems; graphs, directed graphs. Application of these concepts to various areas of computer engineering.

484/EECS 484/IOE 484. Database Management Systems. CS 380 or IOE 373. (Excl). (BS).

Concepts and methods for the design, creation, query and management of large enterprise databases. Functions and characteristics of the leading database management systems. Query languages such as SQL, forms, embedded SQL, and application development tools. Database design, normalization, access methods, query optimization, transaction management and concurrency control, recovery, and integrity.

598/EECS 598. Special Topics in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. Permission of instructor or advisor. (1-4). (Excl). (BS). May be repeated for credit.

Topics of current interest in electrical engineering and computer science. Lectures, seminar, or laboratory. Can be taken more than once for credit.


Summer 1997

400/EECS 400/Math. 419. Linear Spaces and Matrix Theory. Four terms of college mathematics beyond Math. 110. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Math. 217 or Math. 513. One credit granted to those who have completed Math. 417. (3). (Excl). (BS).

See Mathematics 419.


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