Germanic Languages and Literatures


Spring 1997
German Courses (Division 379)

100. Intensive Elementary Course. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 101, 102 or 103. (8). (LR).

This is an intensive introductory course equivalent to the first two terms of college German. The course will systematically introduce students to the basic grammatical and communicative structure of German, focusing on the development of the four fundamental language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), as well as the development of analytic skills and strategies crucial to language learning and success in other academic fields. This course is offered as part of the University's Summer Language Institute (SLI). There are no special enrollment procedures for University of Michigan students. As part of the "intensive" experience, students will be expected to participate in activities such as regular language tables, movie screenings, and excursions. Regular attendance is imperative. Cost:2 WL:1 (Zahn)

102. Elementary Course. German 101 or the equivalent. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 100 or 103. (4). (LR).

German 102 completes the two-term sequence of Michigan's innovative introductory German language program. The course continues to focus systematically on the development of the four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), while emphasizing content and meaning at all levels of the language acquisition process. The course will include regular lectures on grammar, linguistic and analytic strategies, and on topics in German culture, history, economics, philosophy, music, and literature, aimed at the cognitive and intellectual level of adult language learners. Students are presented with immediate intellectual applications of their foreign language study and are prepared to take advantage of the special-topics 232 courses, LAC courses and the expanding German Studies program. Students will practice conversational skills, drill grammar, discuss reading selections in German, and participate in a variety of activities that stretch linguistic ability, as well as intellectual curiosity. By the end of the term students have a firm foundation in the fundamentals of German grammar and are able to understand and respond appropriately to a variety of texts and conversational situations. Students also develop analytic skills and strategies crucial to language learning and to success in other academic fields. Cost:2 WL:1

231. Second-Year Course. German 102 or 103, or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 221. (4). (LR).

In this course, grammar and vocabulary from the first year will be reviewed and extended. Greater emphasis will be placed on reading German texts and talking and writing about them in German. The textbook will be supplemented by a course pack containing additional exercises and readings, and by a series of videos. Readings include both short literary works and non-fictional texts from a variety of fields ranging from history to science and the arts, intended to get students prepared for and interested in the special-topics 232 courses, LAC courses and the expanding German Studies program. Course requirements include daily homework assignments (reading, writing, learning vocabulary, etc.), regular attendance, video assignments, regular quizzes, and midterm and final examinations. Cost:2 WL:1

232. Second-Year Course. German 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 236. (4). (LR). Some sections of German 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

Second course of a two-term sequence in intermediate German. The second-year program is designed to increase students' proficiency in understanding, speaking, writing, and reading German. Students are expected to increase the level of accuracy at which they can understand German texts and express themselves in their area of interest. The language of instruction is German. The special topic and course requirements for this term's section are listed below:

Section 101 German Crime Stories: Literature and Popular Culture. We will examine the representation of crime in various texts and genres, with a view to establishing some characteristic features of these genres. In particular, we will try to establish what sets "serious" crime "literature" apart from "popular" crime fiction and crime journalism, so that this course will constitute a serious and entertaining introduction to the question "What is literature?" Friedrich Dürrenmatt's novel Der Richter und sein Henker will constitute the main part of this course. We will read stories by other "serious" and "popular" writers from Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. We will read newspaper articles and compare their approaches to crimes that caught people's attention. Towards the end, we will discuss several movies. Be prepared to read, write and talk a lot. Two brief presentations, three short essays, one midterm, one final, some grammar, some fun. Please note that the subject matter of this course requires us to deal with material that has violent and sexual content. Cost:1 WL:1


Scandinavian (Division 471)


103. Elementary Swedish. (LR).

For students with no or very little previous knowledge of Swedish. By the end of the term, you will be able to carry on a simple conversation with a Swede (or a Norwegian). You will also be able to write and read letters and essays, and to read simple fiction and newspaper articles. The course is inter-active using various materials; a Swedish textbook with tapes, easy to read newspapers, Swedish movies, etc. Extracurricular activities will supplement regular instruction. Successful completion of the course allows the students to enroll in the third term fall course, Swedish 233. Cost:2 WL:1 (Olvegård)

104. Elementary Swedish. Swedish 103. (LR).

See Swedish 103. Cost:2 WL:1 (Olvegård)


Summer 1997
Courses in Dutch (Division 357)

111. First Special Speaking and Reading Course. Graduate students should elect the course as Dutch 511. (4). (LR).

The combination of Dutch 111 & 112 (Grad 511 & 512) is an intensive course (8 credits altogether) intended as an introduction and first step into the Dutch language and the Dutch-speaking world for students with no prior knowledge of Dutch. The course is organized around the monolingual textbook Code Nederlands, which emphasizes everyday conversation, grammatical explanations with written exercises, and includes a comprehensive vocabulary. Also, lessons from the texts are supplemented by tape programs and special computer exercises. To enliven the class, students will be presented with a variety of texts, music, video, and simple prose, which can serve as a starting point for conversation. This course is offered as part of the University's Summer Language Institute (SLI). There are no special enrollment procedures for University of Michigan students. As part of the "intensive" experience, students may be expected to participate in extracurricular activities such as excursions or language tables. Cost:2 WL:1

112. Second Special Speaking and Reading Course. Dutch 111 or the equivalent. Graduate students should elect the course as Dutch 512. (4). (LR).

See Dutch 111.


German Courses (Division 379)


101. Elementary Course. All students with prior classwork in German must take the placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 100 or 103. (4). (LR).

German 101 is an introductory course for students who have not previously studied German. The course focuses systematically on the development of the four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), while emphasizing content and meaning at all levels of the language acquisition process. The course will include regular lectures on grammar, linguistic and analytic strategies, and on topics in German culture, history, economics, philosophy, music, and literature, aimed at the cognitive and intellectual level of adult language learners. Students are presented with immediate intellectual applications of their foreign language study and are prepared to take advantage of the special-topics 232 courses, LAC courses and the expanding German Studies program. Students will practice conversational skills, drill grammar, discuss reading selections in German, and participate in a variety of activities that stretch linguistic ability, as well as intellectual curiosity. By the end of the term students have a firm foundation in some of the fundamental elements of German grammar and are able to understand and respond appropriately to a variety of texts and basic conversational situations. Students also develop analytic skills and strategies crucial to language learning and to success in other academic fields. This course is offered as part of the University's Summer Language Institute (SLI). There are no special enrollment procedures for University of Michigan students. Students may be expected to participate in some extracurricular activities such as language tables, movie screenings, or excursions. Cost:2 WL:1

111. First Special Reading Course. Undergraduates must obtain permission of the department. (4). (Excl).

The objective of this course is to teach students to read simple German expository prose. Students are introduced to the essentials of German grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, both in class lectures and in texts. The class is taught in English, and students are required to read but not write and speak German. This course is intended for all students, from incoming undergraduates to graduate students who wish to fulfill a German foreign language requirement. There are no prerequisites, but students should be prepared for a substantial workload (readings, grammar, and vocabulary memorization). Course requirements include daily assignments, quizzes and a midterm on grammar and vocabulary, and a final examination requiring the translation of sight passages without the aid of a dictionary. This course does not satisfy the LS&A language requirement. Cost:1 WL:1

112. Second Special Reading Course. German 111 or the equivalent (placement test). (4). (Excl).

The objective of this course is to teach students to read German for research purposes with the aid of a dictionary. Course content includes an intensive review of grammar and syntax followed by translations from texts in the humanities, the natural and social sciences. Choice of reading texts is determined in part by the composition of class. Course requirements include daily assignments, one examination following the completion of the grammar review, and one examination during the reading of assigned texts. The final examination requires the translation of sight passages with the aid of a dictionary. This course is offered as part of the University's Summer Language Institute (SLI). There are no special enrollment procedures for University of Michigan students. Cost:1 WL:1

230. Intensive Second-Year Course. German 102 or the equivalent. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 221, 222, 231, or 232. (8). (LR).

This is an intensive intermediate course, equivalent to two terms of second-year college German, which will reinforce and extend the grammar, vocabulary, speaking, and reading skills developed in first-year German. There will be a wide variety of readings, ranging from newspaper articles to literary, historical, philosophical, and scientific texts; there will also be an entertaining and interesting variety of German movies and videos. This course is offered as part of the University's Summer Language Institute (SLI). There are no special enrollment procedures for University of Michigan students. As part of the "intensive" experience, students will be expected to participate in activities such as regular language tables, movie screenings, and excursions. Regular attendance is imperative. Cost:2 WL:1

232. Second-Year Course. German 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 236. (4). (LR). Some sections of German 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

Second course of a two-term sequence in intermediate German. The second-year program is designed to increase students' proficiency in understanding, speaking, writing, and reading German. Students are expected to increase the level of accuracy at which they can understand German texts and express themselves in their area of interest. The language of instruction is German. See individual descriptions of the sections for topics and course requirements. Both sections of 232 are being offered as part of the University's Summer Language Institute (SLI). There are no special enrollment procedures for University of Michigan students.

Section 201 Mathematical and Scientific German. In this course we will read, discuss, and actually do some basic math, computer, physics, astronomy, and biology work in German (just as Einstein learned to do these things in English...). The necessary vocabulary and grammar will be provided along the way. This should be easier than it perhaps sounds, because the technical terms are usually very similar in German and English, and there is a clear context for guessing the meaning of unknown words. No background in math or science is assumed. Grades will be based on participation, homework, quizzes, and exams. Cost:1 WL:1

Section 202 The German Conception of History. This course explores the problem of History in modern German culture. Modern historical science emerged in German-language Europe in the nineteenth century, and its development was linked to the process of nation-building particular to Germany. Today, too, discussions of German politics, national identity, and culture are saturated with the "problem" of recent German history, in particular the shadow of the Nazi past. In this course we will explore the language of German history as it moved through various stages: Romantic notions of the Volk community; the link between emergent German 'historicism' and the conservative ideal of the authoritarian State, Nietzsche's dramatic repudiation of historicism - right up through the fiery public "Historians' Debate" of the 1980s about the significance of the Holocaust and the right of the Germans to a "normal" history. We will work through a number of short texts to produce this broad picture of the language of German history from the birth of nationalism to German reunification. Students will work through the texts with the assistance of a computer module which will help make connections between the texts and also provide glossary definitions, maps and timelines, visual and audio-visual sources, and workbook exercises. This innovative project has been supported by the University Instructional Technologies Division. Cost:1 WL:1

351. Business German. German 232 or the equivalent. (3). (Excl).

This course will focus on the culture of Germany and its reflection in the structure and interactions/transactions in the contemporary German business world (both within Germany and within the EU). Emphasis will be on developing a sensitivity to German culture which will enable the students to interact successfully in the German business world. Authentic materials will be used, and there will be field trips. This course is offered as part of the University's Summer Language Institute (SLI). There are no special enrollment procedures for University of Michigan students. Cost:1 WL:1


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