Spring Term


American Culture (Division 315)

309. Learning through Community Practice. Permission of instructor. (1-4). (EXPERIENTIAL).
Section 201 Migrant Workers: Teaching English as a Second Language. (3 credits).
This course is part of a new and exciting public outreach opportunity! We will have Seminar orientations (1.5 hrs/wk), weekly discussions (2.5 hrs/wk), journal writings, and hands-on teaching English (2 hrs/wk) to the Spanish-speaking migrant worker community in Adrian, MI. Although knowledge of Spanish is useful, it is not a requirement. Students will be required to complete a two hour on site practicum. Students will create teaching plans, prepare weekly journals, and write a final paper. (Madden)


Scandinavian (Division 471)

103. Elementary Swedish. (LR).

For students with no or very little previous knowledge of Swedish. By the end of the term, you will be able to carry on a simple conversation with a Swede (or a Norwegian). You will also be able to write and read letters and essays, and to read simple fiction and newspaper articles. The course is inter-active using various materials; a Swedish textbook with tapes, easy to read newspapers, Swedish movies, etc. Extracurricular activities will supplement regular instruction. Successful completion of the course allows the students to enroll in the third term fall course, Swedish 233. Cost:2 WL:1 (Olvegård)

104. Elementary Swedish. Swedish 103. (LR).

See Swedish 103. Cost:2 WL:1 (Olvegård)





Summer Term

American Culture (Division 315)

301. Topics in American Culture. (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with permission.
Section 102 The Fabulous Fifties? A Re-examination of America in the 1950s.
For Spring Term, 1997, this section is offered jointly with History 393.101. (Palmieri)

309. Learning through Community Practice. Permission of instructor. (1-4). (EXPERIENTIAL).
Section 102 Migrant Workers: Teaching English as a Second Language. (2 credits).
This course is part of a new and exciting public outreach opportunity! We will have Seminar orientations (3 hrs/wk), weekly discussions (1 hr/wk), journal writings, and hands-on teaching English (2 hrs/wk) to the Spanish-speaking migrant worker community in Adrian, MI. Although knowledge of Spanish is useful, it is not a requirement. Students will be required to complete a two hour on site practicum. There will be a course pack. Students are required to write weekly journals, and a short paper. (Madden)

Geology (Division 377)

116. Introductory Geology in the Field. Reduced credit is granted for GS 116 to those with credit for an introductory course in geology on campus (GS 117, 118, 119, 120, 205, or 206). Contact the department undergraduate advisor for details about reduced credit. (8). (NS). (BS).
Section 721. (June 28- August 13 at Camp Davis, Wyoming).
Students may earn eight credits for studying Introductory Geology in the Rocky Mountains, including: Yellowstone National Park, Grand Tetons, Dinosaur National Monument, and Craters of the Moon. This field course is taught at Camp Davis, a permanent facility built by the University in 1929. Camp Davis is located on the Hoback River near its junction with the Snake River, about 20 miles south of Jackson, Wyoming (the trout fishing is great!). This ideal outdoor classroom offers some of the most scenic and interesting geology in the entire rocky mountain region. Mountain uplifts and deep erosion have exposed a variety of Earth structures and rocks of diverse age and origin. The effects of alpine glaciation, landslides, stream erosion, and a host of other geologic phenonmena are cleary evident in this region and provide an excellent introduction to geology. The geological history of the Teton, Gros Ventre, and Wind River mountain ranges is fully recorded in a sequence of fossiliferous rocks, which in many cases can be interpreted in terms of processes still at work today.The camp is located the trout fishing is great.

GS-116 is a fast-paced, comprehensive course that covers all aspects of modern earth sciences. Students learn about rocks and minerals, both in the classroom and in a variety of natural settings, which leads to discussion of and understanding of topics such as volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, geoenvironmental problems, paleoceanography, and tectonic processes. About two weeks of the course involve field trips to other parts of Wyoming as well as Nevada, Montana, Idaho and Utah. You will have the opportunity to examine rocks, minerals and fossils in their natural settings, many of which are considered "world-class" locations by professinal geologists. In the first week of classroom lectures are a key part of the course, but later most of your time will be spent in the fieldThis is an in-depth course covering all aspects of geology. The dates for the 1997 summer course will be from June 28, when the caravan leaves from Ann Arbor, until August 13, the day that the caravan arrives back in Ann Arbor.

Costs, including lodging, meals, tuition, health fee, textbook, and transportation toand from Camp Davis are $2,677 for all Michigan residents and $3,101 for all nonresidents. Applications are accepted on a first come, first serve basis contingent upon receipt of a $50 application fee (which is included in the above fees). All class-related equipment and field vehicles connected with the course are supplied by the University. For an application form,write to the Department of Geological Sciences, U-M, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1063. Cost:2 (Owen)

440. Field Course in Geology.
Elementary trigonometry, G.S. 310 and 351, or the equivalent. (8). (Excl). (BS).

The University of Michigan geology field course is taught at Camp Davis, a permanent facility built by the University in 1929. Camp Davis is about 30 km south of Jackson, Wyoming, very near the junction of the Overthrust Belt, the Snake River Plain, the Wind River Range, and the Green River Basin.

GS 440 is a broad, in-depth course covering all aspects of field geology. The thrust of this course is to train students to interpret and report on the nature of a variety of geological terrains and to improve their skill in solving geological problems. Field projects include the mapping and interpretation of glacial, deformed sedimentary, regional metamorphic, contact metamorphic, plutonic, and volcanic complexes. Approximately two weeks of the course are spent on trips to other parts of Wyoming as well as to South Dakota, Montana, Idaho, Utah and Colorado.

Successful completion of courses in mineralogy (GS 231), sedimentary geology (GS 305), igneous and metamorphic petrology (GS 310), and structural geology (GS 351) is required for admission to this course. GS 440 runs for 7 weeks in 1997. The caravan will depart Ann Arbor on June 23 and arrive back in Ann Arbor on August 13.

Costs, including lodging, meals, tuition, health fee, and transportation to and from Camp Davis are $2,605 for all Michigan residents and $3,029 for all nonresidents. All class-related equipment and field vehicles connected with the course are supplied by the University. For an application form, write to the Department of Geological Sciences, U-M, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1063. Cost:2 (Owen)

Political Science (Division 450)

140. Introduction to Comparative Politics. (4). (SS).

This course an introduction to the comparative study of politics. That is, it is concerned with political processes that occur within nations and with comparing how governments operate in different countries. The central theme of the course wil be democracy and democratization: why democracy emerges in some countries and not in others, how democratic institutions function, and why democracies give way in the face of authoritarianism, fascism, and communism. We begin with an overview of established democracies in Western Europe, examining links between the government and its citizens such as political parties and interest groups. We then turn to the communist world, exploring such questions as why communism collapsed in the Soviet Union but not in China. Finally, we address the difficulties that democracy encounters in developing countries, illustrating these with reference to Mexico and Nigeria. (Rivera)

160. Introduction to World Politics. (4). (SS).

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to a set of theories, or explanations, of international relations that can help them make sense of the world today and that of the past. We will start with the discussion of the most important theories from the literature of international relations, analyze them and criticize them. Simultaneously, students will be taught how to apply these theories in a critical and logical manner to the major topics of international politics. Students will be introduced to important historical cases of conflict and cooperation. Some of the more specifics topics that we will be analyzing are the end of the Cold War and the new international environment, nuclear deterrence, and the role of the Third World in the international system. (Fanis)


440. Comparative Politics. Any 100-level course in political science or upperclass standing. (3). (Excl).

The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with politics in different types of political systems. Particular attention will be devoted to aspects of domestic politics, including patterns of participation and mobilization, democratization, culture, and revolution. The theme of PS 440 will be the relationship between economic development and democratization in four key developing/reforming countries: Russia, China, Indonesia and Taiwan. The course will compare the evolution of two planned economies (China and USSR/Russia), the pressures towards democratization, and the reasons why the Chinese regime has not evolved like its Russian counterpart. The course will examine how pressures to democratize in planned systems can be compared with the experience of market economies. Taiwan illustrates an instance of gradual evolution towards democracy, while Indonesia's economy has grown without simultaneous political transformation. No prior knowledge of China, Taiwan, Russia or Indonesia is required. (Landry)


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