Courses in Political Science
(Division 450)


Spring 1997

Primarily for First and Second Year Students

101. Introduction to Political Theory. (4). (SS).

This introductory course in political theory will include both European and Chinese texts. The first four weeks will focus on ancient works: Plato, Aristotle, Confucius, and others. During the latter part of the term we will consider recent writing that has been relevant to revolutions of the last 200 years: Rousseau, Marx, Paine, and Mao are some examples. The course will ask students to consider questions about justice, politics, power, and what texts and philosophies might have to do with any of these things in the real world. (LaVaque-Manty)

111. Introduction to American Politics. (4). (SS).

This course examines a range of topics under the broad heading of government and politics in the United States. We will begin by examining the theoretical frameworks of American government, with emphasis on the U.S. Constitution and the Federalist Papers. Following this, we will look at American politics at the level of individual citizens and political institutions, paying particular attention to the ways in which the two are linked. Topics to be covered include (but are not limited to) public opinion, elections, interest groups, Congress, and the courts. We will strive to understand the ways in which the political system works effectively, and the ways in which it does not. The course will be primarily discussion-oriented. Although this is not a current events course, we will often use current events to motivate our discussions. Students will be expected to keep up with reading assignments and participate in class discussions. Grades will be determined on the basis of class participation, midterm and final examinations, and two papers. Cost:3 WL:1 (Bernstein)

Primarily for Juniors and Seniors

412. The Legal Process. Two courses in political science or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

Legal Process combines the study of legal theory with selected case studies in American and comparative law. The course examines the nature of legal interpretation, the organization of legal institutions, the role of constitutions in structuring governments and legal systems, and the relation between law and politics. (Kang)

440. Comparative Politics. Any 100-level course in political science or upperclass standing. (3). (Excl).
Section 001 Democracy in Europe.
The course is a critical look at democracy and the democratization process in both Western and Eastern Europe in the twentieth century, with a focus on the impact that recent developments have had on contemporary politics in Europe. We begin with the questions, What led to the opening of the Berlin Wall in 1989? How is democracy developing now in the former Communist countries? What impact is this having on Western Europe? Democracy, fascism, and communism have each had a major impact on the lives of Europeans this century. The course is designed to give one both an intellectual and personal connection to these developments to help one better understand how common people experienced major changes in politics and the structure of society. The course focuses on connections between the mass society and elite levels of politics, especially such linkage institutions as political parties, interest groups, and social politics and the structure of society. The course focuses on connections between the mass society and elite levels of politics, especially such linkage institutions as political parties, interest groups, and social movements. In Western Europe, we focus on Germany, and in Eastern Europe, on Poland, Czech Republic, and Hungary. The course uses critical essays, class discussions, and original period films (Metropolis, Triumph of the Will, and the Promise) to explore the course topics. Class evaluation is based on active participation in class discussions, a midterm, a term paper, and a final exam. (Holzhacker)


472. International Security Affairs. Two courses in political science or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($30)

The course concerns the changing nature of East-West and North-South relations, focuses on the process by which American national security decisions are made, and treats alternative explanations of national security affairs. A special focus will be on the rogue states, such as Iraq, Iran, Libya, North Korea, and Cuba. Students should have taken an introductory course in international politics, such as PS 160. There will be one exam and a paper on a rogue state. Methods of instruction include lecture, discussion, and presentation. Cost:3 WL:1 (Tanter)

491. Directed Studies. Two courses in political science and permission of instructor and the Director of Undergraduate Studies. (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). Political Science 491 and 492 may be elected for a total of eight credits. No more than four credits of directed study credit may be elected as part of a concentration program in Political Science.

A directed study on any subject agreed upon by a student and an advising instructor that does not duplicate a regular course offering. Students wishing to enroll for a directed study course are urged to work out the details of the course before the start of the term.

591. Advanced Internship in Political Science. Two courses in political science at the 400 level or above and concentration in political science; or graduate standing. Permission of supervising instructor and review by the Department's internship advisor. No more than 4 credits of internship may be included as part of a concentration plan in political science. (2-6). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). All internship courses may be elected for a maximum total of 8 credits.

Advanced Internship requires careful, individual planning between senior students in Political Science and individual faculty members who approve the internship and provide instruction. To register for the course, the student must complete the internship form and obtain an override to enter the course. The form is available in 7623 Haven Hall.


Summer 1997

Primarily for First and Second Year Students

140. Introduction to Comparative Politics. (4). (SS).

This course an introduction to the comparative study of politics. That is, it is concerned with political processes that occur within nations and with comparing how governments operate in different countries. The central theme of the course wil be democracy and democratization: why democracy emerges in some countries and not in others, how democratic institutions function, and why democracies give way in the face of authoritarianism, fascism, and communism. We begin with an overview of established democracies in Western Europe, examining links between the government and its citizens such as political parties and interest groups. We then turn to the communist world, exploring such questions as why communism collapsed in the Soviet Union but not in China. Finally, we address the difficulties that democracy encounters in developing countries, illustrating these with reference to Mexico and Nigeria. (Rivera)

160. Introduction to World Politics. (4). (SS).

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to a set of theories, or explanations, of international relations that can help them make sense of the world today and that of the past. We will start with the discussion of the most important theories from the literature of international relations, analyze them and criticize them. Simultaneously, students will be taught how to apply these theories in a critical and logical manner to the major topics of international politics. Students will be introduced to important historical cases of conflict and cooperation. Some of the more specifics topics that we will be analyzing are the end of the Cold War and the new international environment, nuclear deterrence, and the role of the Third World in the international system. (Fanis)


Primarily for Juniors and Seniors

440. Comparative Politics. Any 100-level course in political science or upperclass standing. (3). (Excl).

The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with politics in different types of political systems. Particular attention will be devoted to aspects of domestic politics, including patterns of participation and mobilization, democratization, culture, and revolution. The theme of PS 440 will be the relationship between economic development and democratization in four key developing/reforming countries: Russia, China, Indonesia and Taiwan. The course will compare the evolution of two planned economies (China and USSR/Russia), the pressures towards democratization, and the reasons why the Chinese regime has not evolved like its Russian counterpart. The course will examine how pressures to democratize in planned systems can be compared with the experience of market economies. Taiwan illustrates an instance of gradual evolution towards democracy, while Indonesia's economy has grown without simultaneous political transformation. No prior knowledge of China, Taiwan, Russia or Indonesia is required. (Landry)

472. International Security Affairs. Two courses in political science or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($30) required.

An analysis of the processes by which security policy is formulated and of the major issues of contemporary security policy including global and regional strategic concepts, arms control, and disarmament.

492. Directed Studies. Two courses in political science and permission of instructor and the Director of Undergraduate Studies. (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). Political Science 491 and 492 may be elected for a total of eight credits. No more than four hours of directed study credit may be elected as part of a concentration program in Political Science.

A directed study course on an individual research topic that is developed between an individual student and a faculty member.

592. Advanced Internship in Political Science. Two courses in political science at the 400 level or above and concentration in political science; or graduate standing. Permission of supervising instructor and review by the Department's internship advisor. No more than 4 credits of internship may be included as part of a concentration plan in political science. (2-6). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). All internship courses may be elected for a maximum total of 8 credits.
Advanced Internship in Washington, D.C. (3 credits).
Students who are interning in Washington, D.C. can gain credit by electing this course which will meet as a seminar in Washington, D.C. Exact details about the course will be available in March. Students should check with the student services office, 7623 Haven, on how to enroll.


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