Introduction to Course Listing Notations

The Spring and Summer Course Guide is published by LS&A Academic Information and Publications, University of Michigan, G411 Mason Hall, 764-6810; Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1027.

This edition contains 100- through 500-level course descriptions provided by the instructors on or before March 3. While every effort is made to make the Course Guide complete, gaps are inevitable. LS&A Academic Information and Publications continues to accept descriptions after the March 3, 1997, deadline, and these late descriptions will be available as received on the LS&A Student Academic Affairs Homepage at:

http://www.lsa.umich.edu/saa/publications/.

An accurate and current course description helps students in their academic planning. Descriptions are published in the LS&A Course Guide for distribution to LS&A students at least one week before early registration. They are prefaced with the course number, title, prerequisite(s), and other information from the updated LS&A Bulletin.

Descriptions generally begin with a statement of the subjects (topics, themes, methods, and include any recommended special background that is not already listed in the course prerequisite). Instructors usually indicate the basis of student evaluation (exams, papers, etc.); the texts which will be required; and the method(s) of instruction (lecture, lab, discussion).

COURSE NUMBERS: The University numbers courses 100 through 999. This numbering system does not always mean that courses with higher numbers are more difficult. Rather, the number system reflects degrees of specialization. Courses numbered on the 100 and 200 levels are usually designed for students with little previous knowledge of a subject, and are often taken by first-year students. In many cases such courses must be taken before more specialized courses on the 300 and 400 levels can be taken, but this is not always true, and you should study the requirements of different departments before deciding which courses to take.

A NOTE ON CLASS SIZE: Courses numbered on the 100 and 200 level, especially those which are prerequisites for more advanced courses, often have large enrollments. Class size in such courses can range as high as 500, although enrollment of 100 to 200 students is more common. To reduce size, many of these introductory courses are taught in sections. Each section covers the same material but has a different instructor and meeting time. For example, sections of Introductory Composition are limited to 22 students, and language sections are limited to 25 (much smaller in more exotic languages, e.g., 15 in Japanese). In addition, many of the larger courses on the 100 and 200 levels set aside a weekly class or two for small discussion sections led by teaching assistants. The presence of teaching assistants in such courses should not deter first-year students from trying to get to know the professor. Most professors welcome contact with freshmen and are troubled by the tendency of large classes to make contacts more difficult for students. First-year students should always feel free to see professors during their office hours and should not suppose that they must have specific (and profound) questions in mind before visiting.

RENUMBERED COURSES have their course numbers followed by a former course number in parentheses. When renumbering or reorganization has left the division unchanged, only the previous course number is given; if the division has also changed, the previous division name and course number appear. A reorganized or renumbered course cannot be repeated for credit without special permission.

CROSS-LISTED COURSES are sponsored by more than one department or program and may be elected through any of the participating departments. Cross-listings are denoted by a slash appearing between departmental titles.

Descriptions for cross-listed courses only appear in the "home" department, but the course title and instructor's name will appear under the other department(s).

COURSE TITLES are in bold type, and follow the course number.

PREREQUISITES appear immediately after the course title.


EXCLUDED COMBINATIONS OF ELECTIONS are designated in the course listing of affected courses.

THE CREDIT SYMBOL denotes the official undergraduate credits that may be earned for the course. Credit is granted in semester hours. One credit usually represents three hours of class each week of the term.

INSTRUCTORS for the term are indicated in parentheses at the end of the description.

THE PATTERN I AREA DISTRIBUTION designation is approved by the LS&A Curriculum Committee on a yearly basis. A course may be approved with the designation Natural Science (NS), Social Science (SS), Humanities (HU), Language Requirement (LR), Introductory Composition, Excluded (Excl), or Not Excluded (N.Excl). Courses approved with the designation "Language Requirement" or "Introductory Composition" may not be used as part of a Pattern I area distribution plan. If an introductory language course is designated "Excluded" (Excl), it may not be used to satisfy the LS&A language requirement. Courses designated "Excluded" (Excl) may not be included in a Pattern I area distribution plan. Courses designated "Not Excluded" (N.Excl) count toward the minimum 30 credits required by a Pattern I area distribution plan but do not earn any of the necessary credits in natural science, social science, or the humanities.

COURSES FULFILLING CERTAIN COLLEGE REQUIREMENTS ARE SO LISTED. (BS) means that the course may be used toward the 60 approved credits required for the B.S. degree. Courses meeting or partially meeting the Quantitative Reasoning requirement are designated (QR/1) or (QR/2). Courses with Standard Approval for meeting the Race & Ethnicity (R&E) requirement are so indicated. Other courses may meet the R&E or QR requirements on a term-by-term basis and are listed in the introductory pages of the LS&A Course Guides.

A SPECIAL GRADING PATTERN associated with a particular course is indicated in the course listing. Some courses offered by the College are offered MANDATORY CREDIT/NO CREDIT, and the notation "Credit" or "No Credit" is posted on the transcript.

EXPERIENTIAL, INDEPENDENT STUDY, AND TUTORIAL courses are so designated. For information concerning LS&A policies about counting credit earned in Experiential, Independent Study, and Tutorial courses toward a degree, see the LS&A Bulletin.

REPETITION of a course that varies in content from term to term is permitted only under certain conditions. When a department or program has a policy about the repetition of a course for credit, that policy is included in the course listing. The general statement "May be repeated for credit with permission" usually means "With permission of a concentration advisor." In all other instances, a student must get permission from both the department or program and the Academic Standards Board to repeat a course for credit. Generally, a course may be elected for credit once only.

LABORATORY OR OTHER SPECIAL FEES are indicated if known, but are subject to change without notice.




COST AND WAITLIST INFORMATION

Information about the cost of books/materials for courses and about various course waitlist procedures is keyed as explained below. This information can be found at the end of individual descriptions preceding the instructor's name. The cost information comes first, followed by the waitlist information.

Cost

The books/materials for this course:

1 Cost less than $50.

2 Cost $50 or more, but less than $100.

3 Cost $100 or more, but less than $150.

4 Cost $150 or more.


Waitlist

If the course is closed through Touch-Tone Registration, you should:

1=Get on the WAITLIST through Touch-Tone Registration, and then attend the first class meeting. Policies and procedures for handling the waitlist will be explained there.

2=Go to the department office to get a WAITLIST, and then attend the first class meeting. Policies and procedures for handling the waitlist will be explained there.

3=Visit the faculty office to see the instructor about getting an OVERRIDE into the course.

4=Wait until classes start, and then attend the first class meeting. Policies and procedures for issuing overrides will be explained there.

5=Other.



A.B/B.S. Requirements

Distribution Courses

Below, you will find courses that may be used to meet the distribution requirements in the areas of humanities, social science, natural science, and not excluded. These lists show you that your choices are many and that some of your choices exist in not so obvious places. Use these lists, along with the descriptions in the Course Guide section, to begin planning the academic schedule that best meets your individual needs.

Spring Half-Term, 1997

Humanities

American Culture
201. American Values. (3).

Asian Languages and Cultures
Chinese 250. Undergraduate Seminar in Chinese Culture. (3).

Japanese 250. Undergraduate Seminar in Japanese Culture. (3).

South & Southeast Asia 225/Rel. 225. Hinduism. (3).

South & Southeast Asia 240. Topics in Asian Culture. (3).

Classical Studies
Classical Civilization 372. Sports and Daily Life in Ancient Rome. (3).

English
223. Creative Writing. (2).

225. Argumentative Writing. (3).

239. What is Literature? (2).

240. Introduction to Poetry. (2).

412/Film-Video 412. Major Directors. (2).

413/Film-Video 413. Film Genres and Types. (2).

Film and Video Studies
412/English 412. Major Directors. (2).

413/English 413. Film Genres and Types. (2).

Great Books
201. Great Books of the Ancient World. (4).

History
397. History Colloquium. (3).

517. History of Ireland Since 1603. (3).

History of Art
151. Art and Ideas East and West. (3).

Judaic Studies
296/HJCS 296/Rel. 296. Perspectives on the Holocaust. (3).

Near Eastern Studies
Hebrew and Jewish Cultural Studies 296/Judaic Studies 296/Rel. 296. Perspectives on the Holocaust. (3).

Philosophy
181. Philosophical Issues: An Introduction. (2).

359. Law and Philosophy. (2).

365/Rel. 365. Problems of Religion. (2).

372. Philosophical Topics in the Study of Gender. (2).

Religion
225/S&SEA 225. Hinduism. (3).

296/HJCS 296/Judaic Studies 296. Perspectives on the Holocaust. (3).

365/Phil. 365. Problems of Religion. (3).


Social Science

Afroamerican and African Studies
303/Soc. 303. Race and Ethnic Relations. (3). (R&E).

326. The Black American Family. (3).

336/WS 336. Black Women in America. (3).

American Culture
206. Themes in American Culture. (3).

304/Soc. 304. American Immigration. (3).

310. Topics in Ethnic Studies. (3).

342/Hist. 368/WS 360. History of the Family in the U.S. (3).

Anthropology, Cultural
101. Introduction to Anthropology. (4). (R&E).

296. Topics in Archaeology. (3).

298. Topics in Cultural Anthropology. (3).

315. Native American Peoples of North America. (3).

Asian Languages and Cultures
Asian Studies 122/Hist. 122. Modern Transformation of East Asia. (3).

Communication Studies
101. The Mass Media. (4).

102. Media Processes and Effects. (4).

351. Structure and Function of Media Systems. (4).

Economics
101. Principles of Economics I. (3). (QR/2).

102. Principles of Economics II. (3). (QR/2).

401. Intermediate Microeconomic Theory. (4). (QR/1).

402. Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory. (3). (QR/1).

History
110. Medieval, Renaissance, and Reformation Europe. (3).

122/Asian Studies 122. Modern Transformation of East Asia. (3).

161. United States, 1865 to the Present. (3).

319. Europe Since 1945. (3).

368/Amer. Cult. 342/WS 360. History of the Family in the U.S. (3).

Linguistics
112. Languages of the World. (2).

Political Science
101. Introduction to Political Theory. (4).

111. Introduction to American Politics. (4).

Psychology
111. Introduction to Psychology. (4).

350. Introduction to Developmental Psychology. (4).

380. Introduction to Social Psychology. (4).

390. Introduction to the Psychology of Personality. (4).

488/Soc. 465. Sociological Analysis of Deviant Behavior. (3).

Sociology 100. Principles of Sociology. (3).

303/CAAS 303. Race and Ethnic Relations. (3). (R&E).

304/Amer. Cult. 304. American Immigration. (3).

444. The American Family. (3).

447/WS 447. Gender Roles and Status. (3).

454. Law and Social Organization. (3).

465/Psych. 488. Sociological Analysis of Deviant Behavior. (3).

475/MCO 475 (Public Health). Introduction to Medical Sociology. (3).

Women's Studies
336/CAAS 336. Black Women in America. (3).

360/Hist. 368/Amer. Cult. 342. History of the Family in the U.S. (3).

447/Soc. 447. Gender Roles and Status. (2).


Natural Science

Anthropology
Biological 297. Topics in Biological Anthropology. (3).

Astronomy
111. Introductory Astronomy: The Solar System. (4). (QR/2).

112. Introductory Astronomy: Stars, Galaxies, and the Universe. (4). (QR/2).

Biology
152. Introduction to Biology: Term A. (4).

154. Introduction to Biology: Term B. (4).

215. Spring Flora of Michigan. (3).

485/Geol. 450. Aquatic Science Field Studies. (6).

Chemistry
125. General and Inorganic Chemistry: Laboratory. (2).

130. General Chemistry: Macroscopic Investigations and Reaction Principles. (3). (QR/2).

210. Structure and Reactivity I. (4).

211. Investigations in Chemistry. (1).

215. Structure and Reactivity II. (3).

216. Synthesis and Characterization of Organic Compounds. (2).

230. Physical Chemical Principles and Applications. (3).

260. Chemical Principles. (3).

Computer Science
183/EECS 183. Elementary Programming Concepts. (4).

280/EECS 280. Programming and Introductory Data Structures. (4).

Geological Sciences
113. Planets and Moons. (1).

450/Biol. 485. Aquatic Science Field Studies. (6).

Physics
125. General Physics: Mechanics, Sound, and Heat. (4). (QR/1).

126. General Physics: Electricity and Light. (4). (QR/1).

127. Mechanics, Heat and Sound Lab. (1).

128. Electricity and Light Lab. (1).

140. General Physics I. (4). (QR/1).

141. Elementary Laboratory I. (1).

240. General Physics II. (4). (QR/1).

241. Elementary Laboratory II. (1).

Physiology
101. Introduction to Human Physiology. (4).

Statistics
100. Introduction to Statistical Reasoning. (4). (QR/1).

402. Introduction to Statistics and Data Analysis. (4). (QR/1).


Not Excluded

Courses designated "NOT EXCLUDED" may be used to complete the required thirty credits for distribution courses in an AB or BS degree program, but they do not count in the twenty-seven total required credits (nine each in natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities) for Pattern I distribution. These courses may also be used to complete the M/L (mathematics and logical analysis) requirement for Pattern II, when appropriate.

Mathematics
115. Calculus I. (4). (QR/1).

116. Calculus II. (4). (QR/2).

425/Stat. 425. Introduction to Probability. (3).

Statistics
425/Math. 425. Introduction to Probability. (3).


Summer Half-Term, 1997

Humanities

Afroamerican and African Studies
334/Hist. 365/Amer. Cult. 336. Popular Culture in Contemporary Black America. (3).

American Culture
204. Themes in American Culture. (3).

240/WS 240. Introduction to Women's Studies. (3). (R&E).

336/CAAS 334/Hist. 365. Popular Culture in Contemporary Black America. (3).

Asian Languages and Cultures
Buddhist Studies 250. Undergraduate Seminar in Buddhist Studies. (3).

Japanese 250. Undergraduate Seminar in Japanese Culture. (3).

English
240. Introduction to Poetry. (2).

367. Shakespeare's Principal Plays. (3).

Great Books
201. Great Books of the Ancient World. (4).

History
365/CAAS 334/Amer. Cult. 336. Popular Culture in Contemporary Black America. (3).

397. History Colloquium. (3).

Near Eastern Studies
Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies 121/Rel. 121. Introduction to the Tanakh/Old Testament. (3).

Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies 221/Rel. 280. Jesus and the Gospels. (3).

Philosophy
181. Philosophical Issues: An Introduction. (2).

340. Mind, Matter, and Machines. (2).

355. Contemporary Moral Problems. (2).

Religion 121/ACABS 121. Introduction to the Tanakh/Old Testament. (3).

280/ACABS 221. Jesus and the Gospels. (3).

Women's Studies
240/Amer. Cult. 240. Introduction to Women's Studies. (3). (R&E).


Social Science

Afroamerican and African Studies
203. Issues in Afro-American Development. (3).

303/Soc. 303. Race and Ethnic Relations. (3). (R&E).

American Culture
210. Introduction to Ethnic Studies. (3).

216. Introduction to Native American Studies Social Science. (3). (R&E).

Anthropology, Cultural
296. Topics in Archaeology. (3).

298. Topics in Cultural Anthropology. (3).

Communication Studies
485/Soc. 463. Mass Communication and Public Opinion. (3).

Economics
101. Principles of Economics I. (3). (QR/2).

102. Principles of Economics II. (3). (QR/2).

History
111. Modern Europe. (3).

Linguistics
112. Languages of the World. (2).

211. Introduction to Language. (2).

Political Science
140. Introduction to Comparative Politics. (4).

160. Introduction to World Politics. (4).

Psychology
111. Introduction to Psychology. (4).

370. Introduction to Psychopathology. (4).

Sociology
100. Principles of Sociology. (3).

303/CAAS 303. Race and Ethnic Relations. (3). (R&E).

447/WS 447. Gender Roles and Status. (2).

463/Comm. 485. Mass Communication and Public Opinion. (3).

468. Criminology. (3).

475/MCO 475 (Public Health). Introduction to Medical Sociology. (3).

Women's Studies
447/Soc. 447. Gender Roles and Status. (2).


Natural Science

Anthropology
Biological 161. Introduction to Biological Anthropology. (4).

Astronomy
112. Introductory Astronomy: Stars, Galaxies, and the Universe. (4). (QR/2).

Psychology
340. Introduction to Cognitive Psychology. (4).

442. Perception, Science, and Reality. (3).

Statistics
100. Introduction to Statistical Reasoning. (4). (QR/1).

402. Introduction to Statistics and Data Analysis. (4). (QR/1).


Not Excluded

Courses designated "NOT EXCLUDED" may be used to complete the required thirty credits for distribution courses in an AB or BS degree program, but they do not count in the twenty-seven total required credits (nine each in natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities) for Pattern I distribution. These courses may also be used to complete the M/L (mathematics and logical analysis) requirement for Pattern II, when appropriate.

Mathematics
115. Calculus I. (4). (QR/1).

116. Calculus II. (4). (QR/2).

425/Stat. 425. Introduction to Probability. (3).

Philosophy
180. Introductory Logic. (2).

Statistics
425/Math. 425. Introduction to Probability. (3).



Courses in English Translation

Foreign Literature and Culture

In the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, courses in foreign literature and culture are taught in a number of departments and programs, and the courses work with texts in more than forty languages. These departments and programs also offer literature and culture courses which use texts translated into English in order to make these works available to all students.

The LS&A Office of the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Education has prepared the following list to assist students interested in electing courses that focus on foreign literature and culture in English translation What follows is a list of such courses offered in LS&A for the Spring and Summer Half-Terms Term, 1997. Courses that earn Humanities credit are so designated. Please consult the departmental and program listings in this Course Guide for course descriptions and further information.

This list is subject to change by the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Education. An updated version will be posted at:

http://www.lsa.umich.edu/saa/publications/ and on the bulletin boards outside 1419 Mason Hall. Check these locations to learn about additions or deletions or call POINT-10 (764-6810).


Spring Half-Term

Asian Languages and Cultures
Chinese 250. Undergraduate Seminar in Chinese Culture. (3). (HU).
Section 101 Longing for Love, Crying for Justice: Complaining Women In Chinese Literature in Translation. (Samei)

Japanese 250. Undergraduate Seminar in Japanese Culture. (3). (HU).
Section 101 Modern Japan in Fiction and Film. (Selden)

South and Southeast Asia 225/Rel. 225. Hinduism. (3). (HU).
(Young)

Classical Studies
Classical Civilization 372. Sports and Daily Life in Ancient Rome. (3). (HU).
(Potter)

Great Books
201. Great Books of the Ancient World. (4). (HU).

Studies in Religion
225/S&SEA 225. Hinduism. (3). (HU).
(Young)


Summer Half-Term

Asian Languages and Cultures
Buddhist Studies 250. Undergraduate Seminar in Buddhist Studies. (3). (HU).
Section 201 Tibetan Buddhist Approaches to Death. (Dalton)

Japanese 250. Undergraduate Seminar in Japanese Culture. (3). (HU).
Section 201 Literature of Resistance: Early Twentieth Century Japanese Literature. (Bowen-Struyk)

Great Books
201. Great Books of the Ancient World. (4). (HU).

Summer Half-TermAsian Languages and Cultures
Buddhist Studies 250. Undergraduate Seminar in Buddhist Studies. (3). (HU).
Section 201 Tibetan Buddhist Approaches to Death. (Dalton)

Japanese 250. Undergraduate Seminar in Japanese Culture. (3). (HU).
Section 201 Literature of Resistance: Early Twentieth Century Japanese Literature. (Bowen-Struyk)

Great Books
201. Great Books of the Ancient World. (4). (HU).


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