Spring/Summer Course Guide

Courses in Afroamerican and African Studies (Division 311)

Spring

Summer

Spring/Summer

Spring Half-Term, 1998 (May 5-June 23, 1998)

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Historical Perspectives

333. Perspectives in Afro-American History. (3). (Excl).
Section 101 Affirmative Action, Historically Considered.
Our goal in this course is to examine, in historical perspective, the current national debate on affirmative action. The course includes four main parts. First, we advance the proposition that today's affirmative action debate is the most recent phase of a centuries long debate over power, position, and access in American society. Next, we trace the concept historically beginning with its roots in post-Civil War Reconstruction. We continue by charting the legal contours of affirmative action from its New Deal precursors to its emergence as federal policy in the 1960s, and identify the components of the broader debate regarding it. We conclude the course by assaying the limitation of affirmative action as metaphor for race in America today, and by considering the implications of this debate for our understanding of power, marginality, and community in American life and culture. WL:1 (Woods)
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336/WS 336. Black Women in America. (3). (SS).

This class will explore the history of African American women in the twentieth century. Covering the period of 1890 to the present, we will look at the social, economic, political, and community lives of African American women. Through examining the variety of Black women's experiences, we will investigate the intersection of race and gender in American life to show the particularities of Black women's experiences and to challenge the masculinizing of the Black experience and the whitening of the female experience in U.S. history and historiography. Cost:2 WL:1 (Theoharis)
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Politics, Economics, and Development

203. Issues in Afro-American Development. (3). (SS).
Section 101 History of Blacks and Cities.
This course is an interdisciplinary exploration of Blacks in cities from the 1920s to the present. Using a range of `texts' music, poems, novels, films, photographs, autobiographies, paintings, and architecture - we will investigate representations of Blacks in cities from the Harlem Renaissance to contemporary `ghettos'. We will also map the migrations of African Americans from the rural south to southern, northern, midwestern, and western urban centers, paying close attention to demographic and economic shifts. This course will be conducted in a lecture/discussion format. Full class participation is expected. Students will be required to write short (1-3) page synopses of the materials we discuss each week. As a final project, students will offer their own analyses or representations of Black urban life past, present, futuristic, utopian, or dystopian. There will be one main book and a course pack. The course also includes weekly film screenings. Cost:1 WL:1 (McQuirter)
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Individual Behavior, Cultural Systems, and Social Organization

303/Soc. 303. Race and Ethnic Relations. An introductory course in sociology or CAAS. (3). (SS). (R&E).

See Sociology 303. (Kim)
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327/Psych. 315. Psychological Aspects of the Black Experience. One course in psychology or Afroamerican and African Studies. (3). (SS).
Section 101 African American Women.
This course provides an historical exploration of the changing representations of womanhood over the past 200 years. Particular emphasis is placed on examining the ways in which those shifting ideas about Black womanhood have manifested in the media, in popular culture as well as within the private lives of many women. The impact of historical forces on women's relationships, their notions of motherhood, and their experiences of political activism, safety, sexuality, and spirituality/religiosity are explored. Course requirements: Weekly journal, midterm and final paper, final presentation. No exams. Cost:1 WL:1 (Mattis)
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Independent Study and Special Topics

410. Supervised Reading and Research. Permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission of the concentration advisor.

For students who can show appropriate preparation in courses previously taken, the Center for Afroamerican and African Studies offers course credit for independent study. A full-time faculty member must agree to supervise the undertaking and to meet with the student during the term. The proposed course of study may not duplicate the material of any course regularly offered by the Center. The reading and writing requirement should be comparable to that required in a regular course for the same number of credits; and all the work must be completed by the final day of class in the term. After consultation with and approval from a CAAS faculty member, applications for independent study along with statements describing the schedule of readings and of writing assignments must be filled out. Such applications must be signed by the faculty member involved and turned in before the end of the second week of the term. It is therefore advisable to submit applications (available in 200 West Hall) in advance of the beginning of the independent study term and, upon approval, an electronic override will be issued.
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458. Issues in Black World Studies. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.
Section 101 Countryside and City in African Society.
This course attempts to illuminate the dynamics of politics in sub-Saharan Africa through a critical analysis of the nature and the changing patterns of the relationship between city-based elites and peasant producers. In the immediate post-independence years, African leaders strove to consolidate their power and to extend the authority of the state over populations scattered in the countryside. Much of the literature on African politics, therefore, tended to focus on ruling classes and the formal institutions of the state. One of the main objectives of this course is to seek to broaden the analytical focus of post-colonial politics to include peasant producers as relevant historical actors involved in complex relationships with city-based ruling coalitions. Texts include: Jonathan Baker, Peasant Farmers and the State in Africa; Goran Hyden, Beyond Ujamaa in Tanzania. Cost:2 WL:4 (Twumasi)
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510. Supervised Research. Graduate standing or permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission of the concentration advisor.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake individual study under the direction of a departmental staff member. Students are provided with the proper section number by the staff member with whom the work has been arranged.
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Summer Half-Term, 1998 (June 29-August 18, 1998)

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Literature and the Arts

204. Cultural History of Afro-America. (3). (Excl).
Section 201 Islam in America, II: African American Muslim Communities.
For Summer Half-Term, 1998, this section is offered jointly with Arabic, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 291.201. (O'Connor)
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303/Soc. 303. Race and Ethnic Relations. An introductory course in sociology or CAAS. (3). (SS). (R&E).
See Sociology 303. (Forman)
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Independent Study and Special Topics

410. Supervised Reading and Research. Permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission of the concentration advisor.
For students who can show appropriate preparation in courses previously taken, the Center for Afroamerican and African Studies offers course credit for independent study. A full-time faculty member must agree to supervise the undertaking and to meet with the student during the term. The proposed course of study may not duplicate the material of any course regularly offered by the Center. The reading and writing requirement should be comparable to that required in a regular course for the same number of credits; and all the work must be completed by the final day of class in the term. After consultation with and approval from a CAAS faculty member, applications for independent study along with statements describing the schedule of readings and of writing assignments must be filled out. Such applications must be signed by the faculty member involved and turned in before the end of the second week of the term. It is therefore advisable to submit applications (available in 200 West Hall) in advance of the beginning of the independent study term and, upon approval, an electronic override will be issued.
Check Times, Location, and Availability

510. Supervised Research. Graduate standing or permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission of the concentration advisor.
Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake individual study under the direction of a departmental staff member. Students are provided with the proper section number by the staff member with whom the work has been arranged.
Check Times, Location, and Availability


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