Anthropology

Courses in Biological Anthropology (Division 318)

Spring

Summer

Spring/Summer

Spring Half-Term, 1998 (May 5-June 23, 1998)

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297. Topics in Biological Anthropology. (3). (NS). (BS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.
Section 101 Neandertals: Brutish Cave People or One of Us?
Since the recognition of the Neandertals as a distinct fossil population, they have been a continuous source of intrigue and controversy. This class is an introduction to the study of Neandertals. It focuses on the fossil and archaeological records and how they are interpreted. Emphasis is placed on hands-on experience with fossil and tool casts. The main topics to be covered are: (1) the historical and social foundations of the Neandertal debate; (2) their biological and cultural adaptations (e.g., language ability, diet, adaptations to cold and aridity); (3) their evolutionary origin and fate (e.g., are Neandertals our ancestors?); and (4) how the Neandertal debate is relevant to our understanding of science and society in general. Grades will be based on two short reaction papers, laboratory worksheets, one laboratory quiz, and a final project. The three scheduled labs are intended to give students a concrete basis for understanding the readings and lectures. Cost:1 WL:3 (Ahern)
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398. Honors in Biological Anthropology. Senior standing and permission of instructor. (2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit twice.

Seniors who choose to enter the Honors program undertake a senior project under the supervision of a member of the faculty. Most often this takes the form of an original paper of greater scope than is possible in an ordinary term paper, and it gives the student experience in conducting and writing up his or her own research. Students who are interested in joining the senior Honors program should consult with the departmental Honors advisor for biological anthropology. Previous participation in the college Honors program is not a prerequisite for joining the senior Honors program.
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471. Undergraduate Reading and Research in Anthropology. Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). A maximum of three credits of independent reading may be included in a concentration plan in anthropology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Laboratory training and work in the techniques used in various aspects of research in biological anthropology.
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Summer Half-Term, 1998 (June 29-August 18, 1998)

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161. Introduction to Biological Anthropology. (4). (NS). (BS).
Biological anthropology is a subfield of anthropology dealing with human biology and evolution. This course presents a survey of the major topics in the subfield: evolution and human genetics, human adaptation and other aspects of human variation, and the fossil record for human evolution. Special emphasis will be placed on how all these issues relate to both social and biological concepts of race. Grading will be based on two one-hour exams. No special background knowledge is required or assumed. (Merriwether)
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297. Topics in Biological Anthropology. (3). (NS). (BS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.
Section 201 Cannibalism in the Past & Present: An Anthropological Analysis.
Among humans, cannibalism is one of the oldest and most emotionally charged topics in the anthropological literature. It is the consumption of human tissue, and evidence for it occurs when skulls are crushed or reduced to small fragments, long bones are broken or split, ribs are broken into small pieces, cut-marks are present primarily on long bones and vertebrae, and some portion of the bones may be burned. Skeletal evidence suggesting cannibalism will be evaluated in the archaeological, ethnographical, and ethnohistorical records of Africa, Europe, Melanesia, and North America. Arguments by various scholars accepting and refuting this evidence, and written accounts on cannibalism will also be discussed. The time period that will be covered is from 2 million years to recent history. In evaluating this evidence for cannibalism, we'll attempt to answer the question, "why cannibalism?" Is cannibalism triggered by a change in, what can be considered, a group's equilibrium? Or, is the cannibalism hypothesis totally wrong and we are observing other behaviors such as secondary burial/mortuary practices or witch executions? The method of instruction is discussion. Grades will be based on a midterm and a final exam, and participation. Texts: course pack available at AccuCopy (at the corner of William and Maynard). WL:4 (Quintyn)
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398. Honors in Biological Anthropology. Senior standing and permission of instructor. (2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit twice.
Seniors who choose to enter the Honors program undertake a senior project under the supervision of a member of the faculty. Most often this takes the form of an original paper of greater scope than is possible in an ordinary term paper, and it gives the student experience in conducting and writing up his or her own research. Students who are interested in joining the senior Honors program should consult with the departmental Honors advisor for biological anthropology. Previous participation in the college Honors program is not a prerequisite for joining the senior Honors program.
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471. Undergraduate Reading and Research in Anthropology. Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). A maximum of three credits of independent reading may be included in a concentration plan in anthropology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.
Laboratory training and work in the techniques used in various aspects of research in biological anthropology.
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Spring/Summer Term, 1998 (May 5-August 18, 1998)

Take me to the Spring/Summer Time Schedule

398. Honors in Biological Anthropology. Senior standing and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit twice.
Seniors who choose to enter the Honors program undertake a senior project under the supervision of a member of the faculty. Most often this takes the form of an original paper of greater scope than is possible in an ordinary term paper, and it gives the student experience in conducting and writing up his or her own research. Students who are interested in joining the senior Honors program should consult with the departmental Honors advisor for biological anthropology. Previous participation in the college Honors program is not a prerequisite for joining the senior Honors program.
Check Times, Location, and Availability

471. Undergraduate Reading and Research in Anthropology. Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). A maximum of three credits of independent reading may be included in a concentration plan in anthropology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.
Laboratory training and work in the techniques used in various aspects of research in biological anthropology.
Check Times, Location, and Availability


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