Spring/Summer Course Guide

Asian Languages and Cultures

Note: The Department Waitlist policy for all courses is 2 - Go to the department office to get on a waitlist, and then attend the first class meeting. Policies and procedures for handling the waitlist will be explained there.

The Department of Asian Languages and Cultures offers intensive language instruction in Chinese and Japanese at the first-, second-, and third-year levels (Japanese 361, 362, 411; and Chinese 361, 362, 411, 421). These language courses are part of the Asian Summer Language Institute. They are officially listed as Summer Term courses, but PLEASE NOTE that they start several weeks before normal Summer Term courses (June 9 to August 15). South and Southeast Asia courses 365, 366, 369, 373, and 374 will run from June 26 until August 19.

See Summer Term section of this Course Guide for course descriptions. All students must apply for admission to the program. Contact the department at 936-3915 for more information.

Courses in Chinese (Division 339)

Spring

Summer

Spring/Summer

Spring Half-Term, 1998 (May 5-June 23, 1998)

Take me to the Spring Time Schedule

Summer Half-Term, 1998 (June 29-August 18, 1998)

Take me to the Summer Time Schedule

Culture Courses/Literature Courses

250. Undergraduate Seminar in Chinese Culture. No knowledge of Chinese language is required. (3). (HU). May be repeated with department permission.
Section 101 If I Were Real: Language and Self in Contemporary Chinese Fiction, Drama, and Film.
Since the death in 1976 of the founder of the People's Republic of China, Mao Zedong, under whom strict controls were imposed on creative writing and other forms of cultural expression, there has been an explosion of literary activity in China. In what has been seen as a direct challenge to the official discourse of the state, writers have experimented in the use of language and new literary forms. At the same time, we can see a search for identity and self-expression unprecedented in the communist era, when the thoughts and desires of the individual were suppressed in favor of the collective goals of the party. We will explore these themes in English translations of novels, short stories, and plays produced in this "new era," and watch films seen by audiences in China. We will also see how writers represented the political violence of the past, the social issues of the present, and the concerns of women. The class will provide underclass students with the chance to participate in a seminar where emphasis is on developing their own skills in discussion and literary analysis. Upperclass students are also welcome. Requirements: class participation, 2 short papers, one group project. (Nolan)
Check Times, Location, and Availability

Language Courses

361. Intensive Beginning Chinese. Permission of instructor. (10). (LR).
An introductory course in modern spoken and written Mandarin Chinese. The course is aimed at the acquisition of basic structural skills through aural-oral exercises, carefully graded reading practice, and the use of videotapes. At the end of the course, students will have learned 350 characters and accompanying combinations. Students should practice with language tapes for two hours for each class hour. Texts: Beginning Chinese, by J. DeFrancis; Beginning Chinese Reader, by J. DeFrancis; Video Skits, by H. Tao. This course is part of the Summer Language Institute and runs from June 8 August 14, 1998. Application is required; if you are interested please contact the department in 3070 Frieze Building. (Tao)
Check Times, Location, and Availability

362. Intensive Second-Year Chinese. Chinese 102 or 361, and permission of instructor. (10). (LR).
A continuation of First-Year Chinese. The goals of this course are to achieve a basic level of reading competence with a vocabulary of 900 characters (plus combinations) and the continuing improvement of aural understanding and speaking competence. These goals are approached through classroom drill and recitation and out-of-class exercises. Texts: Intermediate Reader of Modern Chinese, by C. Chou & D. Chao; A Great Wall, J. Ma. This course is part of the Summer Language Institute and runs from June 8 - August 14, 1998. Application is required; if you are interested please contact the department in 3070 Frieze Building.
Check Times, Location, and Availability

411. Intensive Third-Year Chinese. Chinese 202 or 362, and permission of instructor. (10). (Excl).
A continuation of Second-Year Chinese. The four basic skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) continue to be stressed. Students will be expected to learn to read various styles of modern Chinese, including essays, documentary and journalistic materials, fiction, etc. Students will participate in discussions based on the reading material. Texts: A Chinese Text for a Changing China, by I. Liu & X. Li. The class is conducted solely in Chinese. This course is part of the Summer Language Institute and runs from June 8 August 14, 1998. Application is required; if you are interested please contact the department in 3070 Frieze Building.
Check Times, Location, and Availability

Spring/Summer Term, 1998 (May 5-August 18, 1998)

Take me to the Spring/Summer Time Schedule


lsa logo

University of Michigan | College of LS&A | Student Academic Affairs | LS&A Bulletin Index

This page maintained by LS&A Academic Information and Publications, 1228 Angell Hall

Copyright © 1998 The Regents of the University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA +1 734 764-1817

Trademarks of the University of Michigan may not be electronically or otherwise altered or separated from this document or used for any non-University purpose.