Courses in Communication Studies (Division 352)

Spring

Summer

Spring/Summer

Spring Half-Term, 1998 (May 5-June 23, 1998)

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101. The Mass Media. (4). (SS).

This course is designed to provide an introductory overview of contemporary mass media systems and an examination of the various factors historical, economic, political, and cultural that have shaped their development. The course begins with a description of present print and electronic media and examines their evolution. Attention is given throughout to the legal and ethical implications of mass communication systems and to comparisons between American media systems and those elsewhere in the world. Finally, it considers the probable future course of the media and examines possible alternatives. Cost:2 WL:1
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102. Media Processes and Effects. (4). (SS).

This course introduces students to the contemporary research on mass communication processes and effects. Basic processes involved in the production, dissemination, reception, and impact of media messages are examined. The course investigates a variety of effects on individuals' knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors, as well as influences on the functioning of larger social systems. It proceeds in general from investigations of individual-level to societal-level impact. Critical reading and evaluation of research on media processes and effects, and of its application to social policy debates, is encouraged and developed. Cost:2 WL:1
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111. Workshop on Managing the Information Environment. (1). (Excl).

Hands-on workshop intended to develop student mastery of the rapidly developing and expanding electronic information environment. Skills developed include the use of electronic communication systems, data base searching, word processing, data management, and various research uses of public computer networks and the information superhighway. The course introduces students to a range of campus computing resources, including local area networks and available software, and remote access to the Internet and the World Wide Web. Problem-solving assignments are designed to teach strategies used in finding information and evaluating its validity and utility. Cost:2 WL:1
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321(450). Undergraduate Internship. Junior standing, concentration in communication studies, and permission of instructor. Internship credit is not retroactive and must be prearranged. No more than eight credits combined of Comm. Studies 321 and 322 may be elected. (1-3). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May not be used to satisfy communication studies electives in a communication studies concentration plan. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Communication Studies concentrators who have reached junior standing may receive some amount of experiential course credit for an internship. Student assessment will be based on the academic merit of the work and evaluation of the final paper. Internship credit is not retroactive and must be pre-arranged. Internship credit cannot be used to satisfy Communication Studies electives in the concentration plan. No more than 3 credits can be earned in a single semester, and no more than 6 credits total can be received through any combination of internships (CS 321) or practica (CS 322). Registration is by permission of instructor only. Cost:1 WL:3
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322. Practicum. Permission of department. Practicum credit is not retroactive and must be prearranged. No more than eight credits combined of Comm. Studies 321 and 322 may be elected. (1-3). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May not be used to satisfy communication studies electives in a communication studies concentration plan. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

The practicum is designed to provided Communication Studies concentrators limited credit for appropriate practical experience gained in other than an employment setting. Student evaluation is based on satisfactory completion of an analytical evaluation (e.g., research-based paper) of the experience, under direction of the practicum supervisor. Practicum credit is not retroactive and must be pre-arranged. Practicum credit can not be used to satisfy communication electives in the concentration plan. No more than 6 credits total of combined internship/practicum course work is permitted. Registration is permitted only with approved faculty supervision. Registration is permitted only with approved faculty supervision. Cost:1 WL:3
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371. Media, Culture, and Society. Comm. Studies 101 or 102 strongly recommended. (4). (SS).

This course focuses on the historical origins and evolution of the relationships between the mass media, cultural practices and values, and society. We will read a range of work by media historians and critics who have sought to analyze and explain how media imagery and messages shape our "common sense" notions about identification and behavior, including one's sense of self, attitudes towards success and happiness, gender identification, racial stereotypes, and youth culture. We will review different theoretical conceptions of the audience and of the powers of the mass media. We will consider the debates over whether mass culture has been a negative or positive influence in American culture. Examples of the mass media that we will study include advertising, the news, television programming, and popular music. Our goal is to provide you with a sense of the history of the mass media in America, and to provide you with the critical tools and language to deconstruct their assumptions and techniques. Cost:2 WL:1 (Wolfe)
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381. Media Impact on Knowledge, Values, and Behavior. Comm. Studies 101 or 102 strongly recommended. (4). (SS).

Critically evaluates scholarship focused on the impact of mass communication across a variety of topics. Media impact is treated in both theoretical and applied (research) terms. The research examined spans levels of analysis, including effects on individuals as well as society at large. Topics to be covered include media impact on: beliefs about the world, social values and norms, political thought and behavior, violence and aggression, race and sex stereotyping, mood, health, and self-esteem, social behavior, and children as a special audience. Research on the use of mass communication in public information campaigns is also reviewed, as is the role of media research in providing guidance for social policy makers and media professionals.
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439. Seminar in Journalistic Performance. (1-4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.
Section 101 Media Coverage of the Supreme Court. (3 credits).
This course will evaluate media coverage of the U.S. Supreme Court, in the context of long-range factors affecting the ability of news media to function in a democracy. This seminar will examine the scope and content of news reporting on major cases before the court. How accurately, fairly and adequately do news organizations cover the cases as they proceed through the legal system? Do the media help the American public gain a broad public impact of each case? In addition to an overview of media coverage of the major current and recent cases, each student will select one new case under consideration by the court this term and study in detail how well it is being covered by the different media. Cost:2 WL:1 (Collings)
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441. Independent Reading. Permission of department. (1-8). (Excl). No more than four credits may be included in a Communication concentration. (INDEPENDENT). Comm. 441 and 442 may be repeated for a combined total of eight credits.

Comm. 441 and 442 may be repeated for a combined total of eight credits. Intended for individualized instruction in subject areas not covered by scheduled courses. Must be arranged with the faculty member. Cost:2 WL:1
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442. Independent Research. Permission of department. (1-8). (Excl). No more than four credits may be included in a Communication concentration. (INDEPENDENT). Comm. Studies 441 and 442 may be repeated for a combined total of eight credits.

Comm. 441 and 442 may be repeated for a combined total of eight credits. Intended for individualized instruction in subject areas not covered by scheduled courses. Must be arranged with the faculty member. Cost:2 WL:1
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485(463)/Soc. 463. Mass Communication and Public Opinion. Comm. Studies 361 or 381 strongly recommended. (3). (SS).

See Sociology 463.
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Summer Half-Term, 1998 (June 29-August 18, 1998)

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441. Independent Reading. Permission of department. (1-8). (Excl). No more than four credits may be included in a Communication concentration. (INDEPENDENT). Comm. 441 and 442 may be repeated for a combined total of eight credits.
Comm. 441 and 442 may be repeated for a combined total of eight credits. Intended for individualized instruction in subject areas not covered by scheduled courses. Must be arranged with the faculty member. Cost:2 WL:1
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442. Independent Research. Permission of department. (1-8). (Excl). No more than four credits may be included in a Communication concentration. (INDEPENDENT). Comm. Studies 441 and 442 may be repeated for a combined total of eight credits.
Comm. 441 and 442 may be repeated for a combined total of eight credits. Intended for individualized instruction in subject areas not covered by scheduled courses. Must be arranged with the faculty member. Cost:2 WL:1
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459. Seminar in Media Systems. Comm. Studies 351 or 371 strongly recommended. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.
Section 001 Foreign News Coverage.
This course will investigate coverage of foreign news as a reflection of the structure and function of media systems. What factors influence decisions as to how much coverage to give to developments overseas, at the UN, and at the State Department? What criteria do the media use for deciding which events to cover and at what length, and how valid are these criteria? What value systems do they reflect? How successfully do the media make foreign news relevant to American readers and viewers? What special problems do foreign correspondents face? Cost:2 WL:1 (Collings)
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Spring/Summer Term, 1998 (May 5-August 18, 1998)

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