Courses in English Language and Literature (Division 361)

A complete up to date listing of English Department course descriptions can be found on the World Wide Web at http://www.lsa.umich.edu/english/.

For all English classes, registered students must be present at each of the first two meetings to claim their places. Any student who does not meet this requirement may be dropped from the course. NOTE: If you must miss a class due to religious observances, contact the instructor or leave a message for the instructor with the department (764-6330).

WRITING COURSES:

After taking or placing out of Introductory Composition, students may elect either English 224 or 225 for further practice in the fundamentals of expository and argumentative prose. English 325 offers the opportunity for work in argumentative and expository prose at a more advanced level.
Several sections of English 223, the beginning course in creative writing, are available each term. The work is multi-generic, and two of the following will be covered in each section: fiction, poetry, and drama, or you may take English 227 (Introductory Playwriting). A more advanced course for creative writers is English 323 (Fiction or Poetry), which is available after completion of the prerequisite, English 223. More experienced writers may apply for admission to specialized sections of English 327 (Playwriting), English 423 (Fiction), English 427 (Advanced Playwriting), and English 429 (Poetry). Admission to these advanced courses is by permission of the instructor, who may require writing samples.

INDEPENDENT STUDY:

Independent study in English must be elected under one of the following numbers: 226 (Directed Writing, 1-3 hours), 299 (Directed Reading, 1-3 hours), 426 (Directed Writing, 1-4 hours), 499 (Directed Reading, 1-4 hours). There is a limit to the total hours that may be taken under any one number. Students interested in independent study should obtain an application from the English Department office on the third floor of Angell Hall. Independent study proposals must be approved by a supervising professor and by the Undergraduate Chair of the department. The deadline for Independent Study in the Spring Term 1998 is May 15, 1998. The deadline for Independent Study in the Summer Term 1998 is July 10, 1998.

Spring

Summer

Spring/Summer

Spring Half-Term, 1998 (May 5-June 23, 1998)

Take me to the Spring Time Schedule

125. College Writing. ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).
No one ever finishes learning to write, so this course focuses on helping students further develop their unique potentials as writers, readers, and thinkers. By analyzing texts from a variety of academic disciplines, students will come to understand the conventions writers follow to present their ideas effectively to their chosen audiences. What rhetorical strategies are common in different disciplines and why? How and when might we use those strategies in our own writing? For instance, what writing strategies would we call upon for a lab report, and would we use any of those strategies for a philosophical speculation, a history exam, a love letter? Throughout the term, students will work to identify the writing skills they most need to develop, and they'll invent and refine a personal style of expression that can be adapted to different audiences and purposes. Course requirements include at least 40 pages of writing, including at least 20 pages of revised, polished prose.

Section 101. Our primary goals in this class will be to think more analytically about the world around us and to communicate more effectively our observations about it. To this end, the course will focus on the skills of critical reading and writing. We will emphasize the principles of writing and revising essays, the organization of ideas and argumentation, and the use of appropriate grammar and style. We will experiment with a variety of genres, and you will be encouraged to try new things, take risks and expand your breadth as a writer. Requirements will include reading (Calvino, Gordimer, and others), writing (various drafts of four papers, a journal, other short assignments), participating (in class discussions and group workshops), and thinking (constantly). (Kodesh)

Section 102. Despite what the grapevine may have told you at some point or another, writing is not just for English majors and coffeehouse poets. It is a critical tool that we will all sooner or later need in order to convey our thoughts, intentions, and ideas to loved ones, graduate programs, and prospective employees. By the end of this half-term, we should all have succesfully refitted our writing abilites to better meet the needs and standards of the University and future circumstances, whatever they may be. I won't lie to you. This class is about writing, and there will be lots of it. We will be examining articles and artifacts on Popular Culture, a subject we are already very familiar with. These include screenings of South Park and the documentary Roger and Me. Our writing will be geared primarily towards examining the complex cultural, political, racial, and sexual intersections in popular expressions, so you'll need to engage with the assignmentw with a receptive mind and at point blank range. Expect four papers of varying length with a total of 20-30 pages of revised (polished) prose. (Silva)

Section 104 Voyages of Discovery: Writing Across Cultures. Starting with a selection of Columbus' accounts of his voyages to the Americas and looking at a variety of texts which deal with different cultures coming into contact, this writing class will focus on how individual authors convey information, use different styles, and size up their audience. The first part of the class will concentrate on "primary texts" or the actual documents written by historical personages such as Columbus, freed slave Harriet Jacobs, and Mary Rowlandson, who survived being captured by Native Americans. A trip to the Clements Library on campus to look at archival material is planned. We will read several critiques of these primary texts in order to give a counter perspective, as well as to model the kind of analytical essay writing expected in the longer essay. Each student will produce an autobiographical essay (4-5 pages) as well as two longer essays (one 4-5 pages, the other 6-7 pages) which will be revised for a final portfolio. Each student will write critiques of other students' essays, and have their longer essay workshopped by the entire class. (Stitt)

Section 105. This course provides an introduction to college writing and guidance through the writing process. Because reading, thinking critically, and writing are interdependent, we will be honing all three skills during the course of the term. The readings and discussions in this course will be centered around the objects, images, and issues that together form American culture as we know it. As a generation, we have seen much change in our society due to the information, education, and entertainment that technologies have been able to provide. But, while technology has been able to provide us with a plethora of stimuli, we seldom step back from our environment long enough to digest, analyze, and create meaning out of it all. The readings for this course have been selected to provide a variety of perspectives and aid us in our discussions. In addition to the readings and discussions, you will be required to write and revise four essays during the course of the term. You will also be asked to respond to each others' essays in an effort to help the class as a whole grow as writers. (Ha)
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223. Creative Writing. Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (2). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.
All sections of 223 teach the writing of two of the following three genres: fiction (including personal narrative), drama, and poetry. Different sections will emphasize the individual genres to varying degrees. Classwork involves the discussion of the process of writing and the word of a few published authors. Students will do exercises meant to develop a sensitivity to language and a facility with evocative detail, voice, form, and so forth. Most classroom time, however, is devoted to reading and discussion of student writing. A final portfolio of revised finished work of 35-50 manuscript pages may be required.

Section 101. This course is structured to foster the beginning writer's imagination and artistic potential. Emphasis will be on developing an alertness to the observed world and a feel for the vividness and accuracy of language. Our work will center on fictional and autobiographical traditions. While we will primarily focus on student work, we will also read short stories and essays by Anton Chekov, James Baldwin, Michael Ondaatje, Katherine Anne Porter, Flannery O'Connor, and Lucy Grealy. Class time will consist of close, critical realding of student work, writing exercises, and discussion. In addition to reading assignments, students are responsible for a final portfolio, weekly writing "sketches," at least one student-teacher conference, and consistent class attendance. There is no final exam. Required Texts: The Story and its Writer: An Introduction to Short Fiction, Ann Charters, editor, and a course pack. (Stanton)

Section 102. Ever thought of English as a toolbox? You will now. We will roll up our sleeves and, through close readings, discussions, exercises, drafts, edits, and revisions of prose sentences and poetic lines, delve into diction, syntax, grammar, form, rhythm, image, narrative structure, metaphor, and more - not as abstractions, but as concrete tools you will come to understand and utilize in articulating vision and voice. The emphasis will be on your own writing, with a significant portion of class time spent in workshop. Students will be asked to read assigned poems and stories, to keep a writer's journal, to complete writing exercises, and to complete and significantly revise four poems and 10-15 pages of fiction. Required texts available at Shaman Drum Bookstore. (Kremer)
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225. Argumentative Writing. Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (HU).
This course furthers the aim of English 124 and 125 in helping writers to analyze the various claims of a given issue and to develop ways of exploring and defending positions, ideas and beliefs. Careful attention will be paid to the process of reasoning, the testing of assumptions and claims, the questioning of beliefs, and the discovery of ideas and evidence through analysis and rhetorical articulation. The course will also focus on considerations of style, formal strategy techniques, and revision as integral to precision in making points and developing argumentative ideas for the purposes of both individual reflection and of audience persuasion.

Section 101 Seeing is Believing: Voices and Images in Visual Culture. This argumentative writing class will be organized around the theme of visual culture, public images, ways of reading the image, and the practice of writing about it. Some topics to look at might include representations in the news media, entertainment such as South Park, debates about pornography, or advertising and the arts. Students will be expected to read approximately one essay weekly that addresses arguments in or ways of thinking, reading and writing about different aspects of visual culture. In addition to reading, the writing process will be inspired by visual aids and images from the everyday to the absurd. Writing will include four formal essays, constant rewriting, and about thirty pages of informal assignments. (O'Brien)
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239. What is Literature? Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (2). (HU).
This class is designed to stimulate your thought about issues that should prove central to all your subsequent engagements with literature, inside and outside the classroom. The course is designed to help you formulate productive questions about the nature of literary study and the changing meanings of "literature" itself. Often ranging over a wide variety of genres and historical periods, sometimes including the study of film or other visual arts, 239 asks students to consider texts in a comparative, analytical light. Sections of 239 often devote some time to talking about the social and historical forces that shape a culture's ideas of what constitutes literature. Students in 239 also often address questions of literary value and evaluation. Though discussions often prove theoretical in nature, they are usually tied to particular texts. 239 is designed to help students develop skills that will be crucial to further work in the English concentration: discussion, writing papers about texts, reading critically and with an eye for detail.

Section 101. "What is literature?" It's what we study in literature departments. As you read, discuss, and write about works by Flannery O'Connor, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Emily Dickinson, Langston Hughes, William Shakespeare, and August Wilson, you can decide whether my rather flip response to the question posed by this course's title holds up. You'll also get to ask many more questions about literature and try on a number of critical personas. While we'll focus on the work of the authors listed above and a few others, you'll have a considerable amount of freedom to choose what you read during the term as you select from among the many other writers in the course text and/or "bring in" the work of writers not included in the text. Expect plenty of reading but it's great (I mean this subjectively) stuff and regular "in-class" assignments. Also, I'll ask you to write two short papers. (Kassner)
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240. Introduction to Poetry. Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (2). (HU).
Poetry? Poe-tree. Everything we love and hate about it. It stores the language of the heart, the psyche, the mind in dreaming contact with every living thing. What is sacred, what endangers, what voices carry us across time? We'll read poetry from a wide historical range to discover its power to speak in all languages of what matters, its tendency to shape shift and spill into new forms, and its capacity for infinite beauty and strife. We will meet live poets and dead ones, too. We will read, write, talk, and perform poetry. There will be several short papers. (Agee)
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Primarily for Juniors and Seniors

301. The Power of Words. (3). (Excl).
Section 101.
Effective communication is the goal of all writing. But communication is rarely as simple as it sounds. Writing must negotiate, first and foremost, the basics grammar, vocabulary, and mechanics. We will remind ourselves of such imperatives with various exercises that stress the finer points of these 'rules'. However, the main focus of the class will involve negotiating the dictates of specific writing tasks. How might we establish credibility in the cover letter of a resume? What kind of tone should we use to respond to a threatening memo from a co-worker? In essence, we will build effective rhetorical strategies for establishing authoritative and credible presentations of your written voice. Assignments include four papers (4-6 pages) and numerous short writing exercises. Class participation will be a significant factor in determining final grades. (Ray)

Section 102. The central argument of this course is that the power of words derives principally from a writer's ability to motivate a reader to share in a new perspective. We will rigorously analyze various expressive media (music, film, television, poetry, philosophy, among others) that mobilize the power of words to dramatic effect; we will seek to understand how a given piece of writing achieves its desired goal, whether that goal is persuasion, illumination, critical intervention, or imaginative expression. We will discuss writing strategies that will allow students to make optimum use of the power of words to create their own strong perspective in verbal expression. Focus will be on modes of critical and analytical writing beyond the university, but this practical writing will be grounded on a sound understanding of the function of motivated language in a variety of contexts. Reading assignments will include short, theoretical pieces as well as models of effective analytical and expository writing that we will discuss as a means of establishing criteria for effective writing. We will study individual words with great intensity and work on developing our vocabulary as a reservoir for tapping into the shared cultural beliefs that words embody. Formal writing assignments will include an analytical description, two pieces of evaluative criticism, and an analysis of a current news story. In lieu of a final, students will present a public address to the class on a topic of their own devising related to their future interests. (Kinch)
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319. Literature and Social Change. (2). (HU). May be repeated for credit with department permission.
Section 101 The Beat Generation. I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by/madness, starving hysterical naked,/dragging themselves through the negro streets at dawn/looking for an angry fix . ..
That's how Allen Ginsberg described his Beat Generation. The innovations of the 1950s Beat writers were paralleled by Action Painters and Bebop jazz musicians. We will explore these three outsider art worlds, listen to recorded jazz, poetry and fiction, and look at documentary photographs of the major players while reading On the Road, Howl, Naked Lunch, etc., and viewing slides of Abstract Expressionist paintings. Students are encouraged to attend a live jazz performance. This course incorporates multimedia video and audio presentations. Designed to appeal both to non-concentrators and to students who think they might dig being English majors. This course meets the American Literature requirement for English concentrators. (Tillinghast)
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325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition. (3). (Excl).
This is an upper-level composition course for students interested in improving their writing. All classes will proceed on the assumption that these basic principles inform good writing: that writing is thinking, that writing well requires attention to issues of audience; that revision is a necessary part of the writing process; and that all writing reflects the writer's view of the world. Class discussion will include a consideration of student writing. To focus discussion and to provide subject matter for writing assignments, readings by professional writers will be assigned. You will write one paper (4-5 pages) per week.

Section 101 Writing Biography. In a culture enthralled with 'true' stories such as Titanic and Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, the genre of biography raises pressing questions. To what extent must biographies be 'true'? When is it necessary to invent? Whose lives get written about, and how? Who is most often left out, and why? In this course on biographical writing we investigate the relationship between literary questions of narration (realism, drama, portraiture) and political questions of identity (racial, sexual, and class identities). In particular we focus on the interplay between biographer and subject. What is the difference between writing about someone you know versus an historical figure? And what counts as 'evidence'? Four essays are required, including a final biographical piece. Reading includes Virginia Woolf, Radclyffe Hall, James Baldwin, Sigmund Freud, Carolyn Steedman, David Henry Hwang, and others. Students interested in gay and lesbian, African-American, and women's studies are especially encouraged to enroll. (Gordon)

Section 102. How is the world of a piece of writing, whether fiction or nonfiction, constructed? How do writers involve their readers in their worlds? How is writing an act of persuasion, and how is reading an act of assent or dissent? How do we become more conscious, in our own writing, of such factors as argument and audience? In this upper-level composition course we will read a variety of essays and works of literature, and these will provide us with material for our own writing. The reading list will involve us with works in a variety of styles and genres, including novels (Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness, for one), short stories (including some science fiction!), essays (Virginia Woolf and Walter Benjamin come to mind), and contemporary reporting (but no Presidential scandals). Course requirements will include writing four essays (totaling 25-30 pages of writing), some shorter writing assignments, responses to other students' writing, and constant, relentless, highly vocal class participation. (Roberts)

Section 103 Writing Ourselves. In this class we will work together in a collaborative writing environment conducive to exploration and development of our individual voice, style, expression and tone. While honing our critical thinking and argumentation skills, we will learn to make our writing a persuasive and exciting account of our ideas and beliefs. Specifically, we will consider issues of identity (individual, communal, national) and the ways in which we express that identity, represent or perform ourselves, our opinions, and our pasts. We will be reading a wide variety of essays from a course pack as well as analyzing films, photographs, advertisements and television programs that help us to question expressions of self. Course requirements include four papers in several drafts (two shorter papers and two longer ones), short writing assignments, and daily "observation" exercises. Grades will be determined according to four papers, final portfolio presentations of selected assignments from the term and active, engaged participation in class. (Lieberman)

Section 104 Explorations in the Making of Meaning. The general course guide describes English 325 as emphasizing "exploration and style," for the purpose of helping students "develop new writing skills." While these descriptions will essentially be true of this section of English 325, the course really works on a level beyond mere notions of writing as style and skill. Writing is a way of knowing; it is part of our human process of constructing knowledge. It's not just about strengthening skills and exploiting tricky new formats. What we are trying to do, ultimately, is understand how we come to know things how we make meaning by expanding our notions of what constitutes an essay. To this end we will be cracking open the traditional essay to explore things in useful ways which the traditional essay cannot do. For instance, the multigenre essay combines a variety of genres in innovative ways to capture what cannot be captured in a traditional format. The course, ultimately, is designed to allow students to explore areas of their own interest. Course load consists of four papers (4-7 pages in length) with multiple rewrites, daily response logs, and a variety of short responses/sketches/ etc. At least one of the papers will require research. Students will work in peer groups and conference with the instructor on at least two essays. All reading material will be found in a course pack. (Murnen)
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English 370, 371, & 372

Each of these courses will range over the materials of the periods indicated below in one or more of a variety of ways. Some may be multi-generic surveys; some may focus on the development during the period of specific genres; some may be topical, others formal in their principle of organization. All sections will emphasize the development of student skill in writing essays analyzing the materials and evaluating the approaches in question.

372. Studies in Literature, 1830-Present. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.
We will focus on three distinct historical/cultural periods - Victorian, modern, and postmodern and explore the dominant ideas about individualism, gender difference, and aesthetic form that characterize each of these periods in radically different ways. Our goal is to define the fundamental shifts that have shaped cultural development over the last century and a half. Course materials will include both novels and films. Probable texts include novels by Donald Barthelme, Charlotte Brontë, James Joyce, Toni Morrison, Virginia Woolf, and Charles Dickens, as well as 2-3 films. Midterm, final paper. This course fulfills the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators. (Kucich)
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Summer Half-Term, 1998 (June 29-August 18, 1998)

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125. College Writing. ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).
No one ever finishes learning to write, so this course focuses on helping students further develop their unique potentials as writers, readers, and thinkers. By analyzing texts from a variety of academic disciplines, students will come to understand the conventions writers follow to present their ideas effectively to their chosen audiences. What rhetorical strategies are common in different disciplines and why? How and when might we use those strategies in our own writing? For instance, what writing strategies would we call upon for a lab report, and would we use any of those strategies for a philosophical speculation, a history exam, a love letter? Throughout the term, students will work to identify the writing skills they most need to develop, and they'll invent and refine a personal style of expression that can be adapted to different audiences and purposes. Course requirements include at least 40 pages of writing, including at least 20 pages of revised, polished prose.

Section 201 From Dead Dudes and Dames through Lively Lads and Ladies. This class is a workshop in which we will undertake a practical introduction to critical reading, writing, thinking, and expression for ourselves, each other, and the university. The concerns of the texts we will be reading (from Nietzsche, Freud, Woolf, de Beauvoir, Baldwin, Cisneros, Rock ...) are both radically diverse and strangely familiar opening up the experiences and perspectives of a host of characters, thinkers, readers, and writers exploring the cultural assumptions of their particular times and places. More importantly, these works of the recent and not-so-recent past will help us to sharpen our own critical perspectives as both readers and writers, giving us the chance to explore and to challenge contemporary cultural norms, manners and myths From where have they come? How have they developed? What did they mean then, and what effects do they produce now? Requirements: Four formal papers (including pre-writing, drafts, and revisions), peer critiques, short reading response papers, readings. (Geldenbott)

Section 202 Writing and Cultural Performance. What do Shakespeare, football games, weddings, and Budweiser frogs have in common? They are all "cultural performances" - activities or spectacles which encourage us to think and behave in certain ways. In this class, we will try to understand the persuasive power (or "rhetoric") of cultural performances by writing about them. Our guiding assumption will be that writing about culture is not only interpretation but intervention: each time we send a letter to the Michigan Daily, share a poem with a friend, or fill out a class evaluation, we affect the world through our writing. This class offers the analytic and rhetorical tools to improve the various kinds of writing you will do in future by developing your confidence, range, and clarity of expression. Since this is a writing class, you should expect to do a good deal of writing throughout the semester! Our short assignments will include a letter to the editor, an editorial, and a brief persuasive speech. Longer assignments will include analyzing a social ritual and a popular culture "text." Class time will be devoted to discussing assigned readings and to presenting and workshopping work in progress. Please note that extensive class participation is a requirement of this course. Each student will be expected to give class presentations and participate in class discussion, office hours, and peer workshops. (Sofer)
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239. What is Literature? Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (2). (HU).
Our world seems less and less literate every day, as advertising images, video, and music become our principal means of expression, but we continue to speak to one another in words, and literature is made up of words. In what ways are words relevant to your daily life and to your attempts to understand and to be understood? This is another way of asking the question "What is literature?," and it will guide our thinking about how language is central to everyday existence. Our accent will be on storytelling and its basic components (ideas about narrative, character, and plot). Our goal will be to understand why it is important for everyone to know what a story is. Our readings will be chosen from among the writings of Isak Dinesen, Adrienne Kennedy, Gabriel Garciá-Márquez, and Jean-Paul Sartre. Requirements include short weekly writing assignments, two 5-7 page papers, and exams. (Siebers)
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240. Introduction to Poetry. Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (2). (HU).
Section 201.
The first third of this course will concentrate on prosody the techniques of verse, how poems are put together and how they work. The second third will be devoted to the study of a few major poems as they represent various periods/styles in English and American literature (e.g. baroque, romanticism, modernism). Finally, the last third of the course will be determined by class consensus whatever you (plural) would like to read. The text will be The Norton Anthology of Poetry. I will probably assign you a short paper (2-3 pages) each week and most likely will give a final exam, although if everyone does a super job all term long, I might forget it. (Beauchamp)

Section 202. Work in class will be devoted to discussion of particular poems selected The Norton Anthology of Poetry. The aim of the discussion will be to increase your understanding and appreciation of poetry. The first course objective will be to develop some common questions or assumptions about poetry. The second objective will be to find ways of answering such questions or testing such assumptions, and we will spend the greater part of the course reading poems in an effort to accomplish this. In the final weeks of the course we will read a number of poems by one poet. There will be a midterm, a short paper or two, in-class exercises, and a final. Cost:1 (Lenaghan)
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Primarily for Juniors and Seniors

325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition. (3). (Excl).
Section 201.
This is a writing course and its goal, as you might expect, is to help you write better. To that end you will write a paper every week and the writing cycle preparation, writing, peer editing, revision, submission, and return will determine how class time is spent. To provide some common focus we will read Shakespeare's Richard III and see McKellen and Pacino films. The course grade will be calculated as the average of the individual paper studies. (Lenaghan)

Section 202 Big Ideas About Small Talk: Looking for the Roots of Literary Narrative in Everyday Chatter. This course will present students with a number of challenging questions regarding the relationship between written language and everyday oral narratives. What, for example, do such elements of daily conversation as gossip, jokes, stories, modern folklore (those strange but "true" stories we hear and pass on), various small talk, etc., have to do with the narrative structure of novels, short stories, drama, film, etc.? This course will also address such burgeoning issues as the current and future relationship between verbal, interpersonal narratives, and "chatting" in cyberspace; that is, will the Internet (still in its infancy) help human language to evolve into spoken/written hybrid, or is this just wishful thinking? Naturally, students should be prepared to do quite a bit of verbal sharing in class and be ready to postulate answers to these and other tough questions, both during in-class discussion, and in several polished essays. (Melanson)
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367. Shakespeare's Principal Plays. (3). (HU).
Section 201.
This is a course that will concentrate on the Shakespearean tragedy by focusing on "the grand style" of Hamlet, Macbeth, Othello, and King Lear. But in doing so, we will study the origins of this tragic mode in the earlier tragedies and its later manifestations in Antony and Cleopatra, and Coriolanus. There will be a midterm and an final exam. This course satisfies the Pre-1830 Literature requirement for English concentrators. Cost:2 (Brater)
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English 370, 371, & 372

Each of these courses will range over the materials of the periods indicated below in one or more of a variety of ways. Some may be multi-generic surveys; some may focus on the development during the period of specific genres; some may be topical, others formal in their principle of organization. All sections will emphasize the development of student skill in writing essays analyzing the materials and evaluating the approaches in question.

370. Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.
This course will introduce you to some of the best medieval literature from England and Western Europe. A tentative list of texts includes Beowulf, the Arthurian Romances of Chretien de Troyes, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight , the Old Norse Grettir's Saga, and a selection of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales. We will read, discuss, and write about these works from a wide variety of perspectives, but I will be paying special attention to the way in which they construct ethical systems by means of literary conventions. Requirements include a willingness to participate actively in class discussion, and three medium-length papers (6-8 pp.). This course satisfies the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators. (Tanke)
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372. Studies in Literature, 1830-Present. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.
Section 201 Introduction to Fantastic Literature.
Romanticism was a movement of poetic lyricism, artistic rebellion, and personal idiosyncrasy. Fantastic literature enshrines differences and peculiarities of all kinds, highlighting those aspects of experience that venture beyond the strictly human toward a supernatural realm. In fantastic literature, then, the visionary poetics of the Romantic generation and the superstitious nightmares of common people converge, affirming idiosyncrasy, originality, and irrationality on all fronts. This course will descend into the maelstrom of fantastic violence, irrationality, and rebellion to ask how such apparently marginal phenomena prove to be not only central to the nature of literature itself but remarkably stimulating to the modern mind. Works include the short fiction of Hawthorne, Henry James, Poe, Washington Irving and the European writers, Nikolai Gogol, E.T.A. Hoffmann, and Guy de Maupassant. Requirements include a few short papers, some exams, and class participation. This course satisfies the American Literature requirement for English concentrators. (Siebers)
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449/Theatre 423. American Theatre and Drama. (3). (HU).
See Theatre and Drama 423. This course satisfies the American Literature requirement for English concentrators. (Brater)
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473. Topics in American Literature. (3 in IIIA, 2 in IIIB). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.
Section 201 Class and Money in American Fiction.
This course will explore the interrelationships of class and money in some American fiction. These will range from the rags-to-riches success formula of Horatio Alger's Ragged Dick of the 1880's to Tom Wolfe's satire of the glitzy get-rich 1980s, Bonfire of the Vanities. In between we will read W.D. Howells' A Traveler from Altruria, Henry James' The American, Jack London's Martin Eden, Theodore Dreiser's Sister Carrie, Edith Wharton's The House of Mirth, F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby, Sinclair Lewis' Babbitt, John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath, and Philip Roth's Goodbye Columbus. Grades in the course will be based on three hourly exams and one essay (or perhaps two). This also satisfies the American Literature requirement for English concentrators. Cost:3 (Beauchamp)
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Spring/Summer Term, 1998 (May 5-August 18, 1998)

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