Spring/Summer Course Guide

Courses in Geological Sciences (Division 377)

Spring

Summer

Spring/Summer

Spring Half-Term, 1998 (May 5-June 23, 1998)

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A. Introductory Courses and Courses for Non-concentrators

G.S. 100-115 are short (half-term) courses. They consist of detailed examinations of restricted geologic topics. The department lists the specific courses from this series in the Time Schedule. These courses are designed primarily for students with no prior geologic training and they are open to all interested persons. G.S. 100-115 are offered on the graded pattern (optional pass/fail).

113. Planets and Moons. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GS 204 or 278. (1). (NS). (BS).

This minicourse provides an overview of the evolution of the solar system and the present day geology and climates of the planets and their moons. Topics include history of planetary science, formation of the solar system, Earth as a planet, differences and similarities between Earth and other planets, and modern planetary exploration. The approach to this topic will be descriptive and no previous knowledge of geology is required. The grade is determined by a number of quizzes and a final multiple-choice examination. Cost:1 WL:3 (Van Keken)
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411. Geology of Michigan. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GS 283. (3). (Excl). (BS).

This course surveys the geologic evolution of Michigan and the surrounding Great Lakes region in the context of modern geologic theory. The course can be taken by students with no background in geology, although a background in high-school level science and math is necessary. It begins with a review of important basic geologic principles and uses this foundation to illustrate more advanced geologic concepts in the context of the geologic evolution of the Great Lakes region. This approach permits the course to deal with problems that are of present research interest to geoscientists, such as processes of formation of the early crust, evolution of important crustal features such as the Michigan Basin and its oil reserves, and the Mid-Continent Rift and its copper deposits, as well as preservation of evidence of glaciation in the recent and distant past. The course consists of lectures and take-home exercises involving map interpretation that are designed to illustrate the points being made in class. A book is recommended for the course and a course pack is required. Cost:2 WL:4 (Kesler)
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Summer Half-Term, 1998 (June 29-August 18, 1998)

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A. Introductory Courses and Courses for Non-concentrators

G.S. 100-115 are short (half-term) courses. They consist of detailed examinations of restricted geologic topics. The department lists the specific courses from this series in the Time Schedule for the terms they are offered (fall and winter terms only). Each course, when offered, meets twice weekly for half of the term (first half or second half), and the specific dates for each course are printed in the Time Schedule. These courses are designed primarily for students with no prior geologic training and they are open to all interested persons. G.S. 100-115 are offered on the graded pattern (optional pass/fail).

116. Introductory Geology in the Field. Reduced credit is granted for GS 116 to those with credit for an introductory course in geology on campus (GS 117, 118, 119, 120, 205, or 206). Contact the department undergraduate advisor for details about reduced credit. (8). (NS). (BS).
Section 721. (June 28- August 13 at Camp Davis, Wyoming).
Students may earn eight credits for studying Introductory Geology in the Rocky Mountains, including: Yellowstone National Park, Grand Tetons, Dinosaur National Monument, and Craters of the Moon. This field course is taught at Camp Davis, a permanent facility built by the University in 1929. Camp Davis is located on the Hoback River near its junction with the Snake River, about 20 miles south of Jackson, Wyoming (the trout fishing is great!). This ideal outdoor classroom offers some of the most scenic and interesting geology in the entire rocky mountain region. Mountain uplifts and deep erosion have exposed a variety of Earth structures and rocks of diverse age and origin. The effects of alpine glaciation, landslides, stream erosion, and a host of other geologic phenomena are clearly evident in this region and provide an excellent introduction to geology. The geological history of the Teton, Gros Ventre, and Wind River mountain ranges is fully recorded in a sequence of fossiliferous rocks, which in many cases can be interpreted in terms of processes still at work today.

GS-116 is a fast-paced, comprehensive course that covers all aspects of modern earth sciences. Students learn about rocks and minerals, both in the classroom and in a variety of natural settings, which leads to discussion of and understanding of topics such as volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, geoenvironmental problems, paleoceanography, and tectonic processes. About two weeks of the course involve field trips to other parts of Wyoming as well as Nevada, Montana, Idaho and Utah. You will have the opportunity to examine rocks, minerals and fossils in their natural settings, many of which are considered "world-class" locations by professional geologists. In the first week of classroom lectures are a key part of the course, but later most of your time will be spent in the field. This is an in-depth course covering all aspects of geology. The dates for the 1998 summer course will be from June 27, when the caravan leaves from Ann Arbor, until August 12, the day that the caravan arrives back in Ann Arbor.

Costs, including lodging, meals, tuition, health fee, textbook, and transportation to and from Camp Davis are $2,681 for resident lower division students and $2,868 for resident upper division students. The non-resident fees are $3,181 and $3,368 for upper and lower division students, respectively. Applications are accepted on a first come, first serve basis contingent upon receipt of a $50 application fee (which is included in the above fees). All class-related equipment and field vehicles connected with the course are supplied by the University. For an application form, write or email Dr. Carola H. Stearns (cstearns@umich.edu), the Department of Geological Sciences, U-M, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1063. Cost:2 (Owen)
See:  http://www.geo.lsa.umich.edu/dept98/davis/116.html
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B. Primarily for Concentrators

440. Field Course in Geology. Elementary trigonometry, GS 310 and 351. (8). (Excl). (BS).
The University of Michigan geology field course is taught at Camp Davis, a permanent facility built by the University in 1929. Camp Davis is about 30 km south of Jackson, Wyoming, very near the junction of the Overthrust Belt, the Snake River Plain, the Wind River Range, and the Green River Basin.

GS 440 is a broad, in-depth course covering all aspects of field geology. The thrust of this course is to train students to interpret and report on the nature of a variety of geological terrains and to improve their skill in solving geological problems. Field projects include the mapping and interpretation of glacial, deformed sedimentary, regional metamorphic, contact metamorphic, plutonic, and volcanic complexes. Approximately two weeks of the course are spent on trips to other parts of Wyoming as well as to South Dakota, Montana, Idaho, Utah and Colorado.
Successful completion of courses in mineralogy (GS 231), sedimentary geology (GS 305), igneous and metamorphic petrology (GS 310), and structural geology (GS 351) is required for admission to this course. GS 440 runs for 7 weeks in 1998. The caravan will depart Ann Arbor on June 22 and arrive back in Ann Arbor on August 12.

Costs, including lodging, meals, tuition, health fee, and transportation to and from Camp Davis are $2,793 for all Michigan residents and $3,293 for all nonresidents. All class-related equipment and field vehicles connected with the course are supplied by the University. For an application form, write or email Dr. Carola H. Stearns (cstearns@umich.edu), the Department of Geological Sciences, U-M, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1063. Cost:2 (Owen)
See:  http://www.geo.lsa.umich.edu/dept98/davis/440.html
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Spring/Summer Term, 1998 (May 5-August 18, 1998)

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