Spring/Summer Course Guide

Germanic Languages and Literatures

German Courses (Division 379)

Spring

Summer

Spring/Summer

Spring Half-Term, 1998 (May 5-June 23, 1998)

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100. Intensive Elementary Course. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 101, 102 or 103. (8). (LR).

This is an intensive introductory course equivalent to the first two terms of college German. The course will systematically introduce students to the basic grammatical and communicative structure of German, focusing on the development of the four fundamental language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), as well as the development of analytic skills and strategies crucial to language learning and success in other academic fields. The course will include guest lectures on topics in German culture aimed at the cognitive and intellectual level of adult language learners. As part of the "intensive" experience, students will be expected to participate in activities such as regular language tables, movie screenings, and excursions. Regular attendance is imperative. Cost:2 WL:1
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102. Elementary Course. German 101. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 100 or 103. (4). (LR).

German 102 is the continuation of German 101. The course continues to focus systematically on the development of the four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), while emphasizing content and meaning at all levels of the language acquisition process. The course will include guest lectures on topics in German culture aimed at the cognitive and intellectual level of adult language learners. Students will practice conversational skills, drill grammar, discuss reading selections in German, and participate in a variety of activities that stretch linguistic ability, as well as intellectual curiosity. By the end of the term students have a firm foundation in the fundamentals of German grammar and are able to understand and respond appropriately to a variety of texts and conversational situations. Cost:2 WL:1
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111. First Special Reading Course. Undergraduates must obtain permission of the department. (4). (Excl).

The objective of this course is to teach students to read simple German expository prose. Students are introduced to the essentials of German grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, both in class lectures and in texts. The class is taught in English, and students are required to read but not write and speak German. This is a fast-paced course with a substantial workload, intended for students with some experience in language learning, and is therefore recommended only to graduate students who wish to meet a German foreign language requirement and to advanced undergraduates who have already met the LS&A foreign language requirement. Course requirements include daily assignments, quizzes, a midterm on grammar and vocabulary, and a final examination requiring the translation of sight passages without the aid of a dictionary. The course does not satisfy the LS&A foreign language requirement. This course is offered as part of the University's Summer Language Institute (SLI). There are no special enrollment procedures for University of Michigan students. Cost:1 WL:1
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206. Conversation Practice. German 102 or 103. Students previously enrolled in a 300- or 400 -evel conversation course may not register for 205 or 206. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

The unwritten German class! In this course, you will dramatize everyday situations that ask for spontaneously expressing an opinion or formulating an argument. The topics that nourish our discussions are both inclusive and inconclusive: current cultural events, German etiquette, popular magazines. By cross-analyzing various resources, you will hone your conversation skills while you learn simultaneously about German cultural institutions. Although far from being exclusive, this class may address in particular those of you who are currently enrolled in German 231 or 232 and those who intend to participate in the junior-year-abroad program. Course requirements are: active clan participation, thorough preparation, and oral presentations. Cost:1 WL:1
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231. Second-Year Course. German 102 or 103, or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 221. (4). (LR).

In this course, grammar and vocabulary from the first year will be reviewed and extended. Greater emphasis will be placed on reading German texts and talking and writing about them in German. The textbook will be supplemented by a course pack containing additional exercises and readings, and by a series of videos. Readings include both short literary works and non-fictional texts from a variety of fields ranging from history to science and the arts, intended to get students prepared for and interested in the special-topics 232 courses, LAC courses and the expanding German Studies program. Course requirements include daily homework assignments (reading, writing, learning vocabulary, etc.), regular attendance, video assignments, regular quizzes, and midterm and final examinations. Cost:2 WL:1
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232. Second-Year Course. German 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 236. (4). (LR). All sections of German 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

Second course of a two-term sequence in intermediate German. The second-year program is designed to increase students' proficiency in understanding, speaking, writing, and reading German. Students are expected to increase the level of accuracy at which they can understand German texts and express themselves in their area of interest. The language of instruction is German. The special topic and course requirements for this term's section are listed below:

Section 101 German Crime Stories: Literature and Popular Culture. We will examine the representation of crime in various texts and genres, with a view to establishing some characteristic features of these genres. In particular, we will try to establish what sets "serious" crime "literature" apart from "popular" crime fiction and crime journalism, so that this course will constitute a serious and entertaining introduction to the question "What is literature?" Friedrich Dürrenmatt's novel Der Richter und sein Henker will constitute the main part of this course. We will read stories by other "serious" and "popular" writers from Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. We will read newspaper articles and compare their approaches to crimes that caught people's attention. Towards the end, we will discuss several movies. Be prepared to read, write, and talk a lot. Two brief presentations, three short essays, one midterm, one final, some grammar, some fun. Please note that the subject matter of this course requires us to deal with material that has violent and sexual content. Cost:1 WL:1
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306. Conversation Practice. German 232; concurrent enrollment in a 300-level course is encouraged but not necessary. Students who have previously participated in a 400-level conversation course may not register for 305 or 306. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

The goal of this course is to increase students' confidence in speaking on any topic and, therefore, the course will focus on a variety of topics ranging from practical language situations to current cultural events to areas of students' academic interests. Students will work on expanding vocabulary, finding synonyms and understanding/using varying spoken styles, which are necessary to appreciate life in German-speaking communities. The materials for the class will come from German websites as well as various materials from the instructor. Course requirements are: energetic class participation, thorough preparation, e-mail in German with the instructor and fellow students, and oral presentations. Cost:1 WL:1
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329. Independent Study. Permission of chairman. (1-2)(Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Independent study for students who need work in a certain area to complete their degrees and are unable to acquire it from a regularly scheduled course.
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Summer Half-Term, 1998 (June 29-August 18, 1998)

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101. Elementary Course. All students with prior coursework in German must take the placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 100 or 103. (4). (LR).
German 101 is an introductory course for students who have not previously studied German. The course focuses systematically on the development of the four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), while emphasizing content and meaning at all levels of the language acquisition process. The course will include guest lectures on topics in German culture aimed at the cognitive and intellectual level of adult language learners. Students will practice conversational skills, drill grammar, discuss reading selections in German, and participate in a variety of activities that stretch linguistic ability, as well as intellectual curiosity. By the end of the term students have a firm foundation in some of the fundamental elements of German grammar and are able to understand and respond appropriately to a variety of texts and basic conversational situations. Cost:2 WL:1
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111. First Special Reading Course. Undergraduates must obtain permission of the department. (4). (Excl).
The objective of this course is to teach students to read simple German expository prose. Students are introduced to the essentials of German grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, both in class lectures and in texts. The class is taught in English, and students are required to read but not write and speak German. This course is intended for all students, from incoming undergraduates to graduate students who wish to fulfill a German foreign language requirement. There are no prerequisites, but students should be prepared for a substantial workload (readings, grammar, and vocabulary memorization). Course requirements include daily assignments, quizzes and a midterm on grammar and vocabulary, and a final examination requiring the translation of sight passages without the aid of a dictionary. This course does not satisfy the LS&A language requirement. Cost:1 WL:1
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112. Second Special Reading Course. German 111 or the equivalent (placement test). (4). (Excl).
The objective of this course is to teach students to read German for research purposes with the aid of a dictionary. Course content includes an intensive review of grammar and syntax followed by translations from texts in the humanities, the natural and social sciences. Choice of reading texts is determined in part by the composition of class. Course requirements include daily assignments, quizzes, and a examination requiring the translation of sight passages with the aid of a dictionary. Cost:1 WL:1
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230. Intensive Second-Year Course. German 102 or 103. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 221, 231, or 232. (8). (LR).
This is an intensive intermediate course, equivalent to two terms of second-year college German, which will reinforce and extend the grammar, vocabulary, speaking, and reading skills developed in first-year German. There will be a wide variety of readings, ranging from newspaper articles to literary, historical, philosophical, and scientific texts; there will also be an entertaining and interesting variety of German movies and videos. As part of the "intensive" experience, students will be expected to participate in activities such as regular language tables, movie screenings, and excursions. Regular attendance is imperative. Cost:2 WL:1
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232. Second-Year Course. German 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 236. (4). (LR). All sections of German 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.
Second course of a two-term sequence in intermediate German. The second-year program is designed to increase students' proficiency in understanding, speaking, writing, and reading German. Students are expected to increase the level of accuracy at which they can understand German texts and express themselves in their area of interest. The language of instruction is German. See individual descriptions of the sections for topics and course requirements. Both sections of 232 are being offered as part of the University's Summer Language Institute (SLI). There are no special enrollment procedures for University of Michigan students.

Section 201 Mathematical and Scientific German. This course serves as an excellent introduction to the tools that are vital for pursuing further science-based work in German - practical or academic. Recently, one of the reasons why students have taken this course has been to prepare themselves for summer internships available with German companies or for study abroad in technical and scientific fields. In this course we will spend several weeks reading discussing, and actually doing some basic math, computer, physics, astronomy, and biology work in German. In addition, we will also pause along the way to consider the nature of science and the cultural values that can underlie it as well as the ethical implications that a rapidly increasing amount of technology and knowledge has on our society today. The necessary vocabulary and grammar will be provided along the way. Only a very basic background in math or science is assumed. Grades will be based on participation, homework, quizzes, and exams. Cost:1 WL:1
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329. Independent Study. Permission of chairman. (1-2)(Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.
Independent study for students who need work in a certain area to complete their degrees and are unable to acquire it from a regularly scheduled course.
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Spring/Summer Term, 1998 (May 5-August 18, 1998)

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