Spring/Summer Course Guide

Courses in Great Books (Division 382)

Spring

Summer

Spring/Summer

Spring Half-Term, 1998 (May 5-June 23, 1998)

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201. Great Books of the Ancient World. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Gt. Bks. 191 or Classical Civ. 101. (4). (HU).
In this course we will trace the movement of Western literature through the themes of journey, homecoming, and exile, depicted in the genres of epic, tragedy, and comedy, as well as in philosophical and theological writings. We will be reading the following texts: Homer's Odyssey; Aeschylus' Agamemnon trilogy; Euripides' Medea; Sophocles' Oedipus the King and Antigone; Plato's Symposium; Aristophanes' Lysistrata; sections of the Old Testament; and Vergil's Aeneid. Our objective will be to see how the quest for home shifts through the unfolding of literary history. By examining the polemics of home and exile, external and internal movement (action versus contemplation), and the tensions of gender, we will explore the existential, ethical, historical, and theological implications of what it means to be at home. (Klingerman)
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Summer Half-Term, 1998 (June 29-August 18, 1998)

Take me to the Summer Time Schedule

201. Great Books of the Ancient World. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Gt. Bks. 191 or Classical Civ. 101. (4). (HU).
Through the works of poetry, drama, history, and philosophy, this course will explore the complicated relationship between identity and justice. We oftern find that our sense of self is partly formed by our concept of justice, and if something acts in opposition to our understanding o justice out entire identity is compromised. These works depict the ways in which we try to form and understand ourselves and how our desperate need to hold onto our identity causes us to shape the world around us. To understand this relationship, we will read the following texts: Homer's Odyssey; Aeschylus' Oresteia, Euripides' Medea, Sophocles' Antigone, parts of Thucydides' History of the Peloponnesian War, Aristophanes' Clouds, Plato's Apology, and Vergil's Aeneid. It will be fun. (Miller-Purrenhage)
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