Courses in History (Division 390)

Spring

Summer

Spring/Summer

Spring Half-Term, 1998 (May 5-June 23, 1998)

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100-Level Courses are Survey Courses and Introductory Courses for First- and Second-Year Students

110. Medieval, Renaissance, and Reformation Europe. (3). (SS).

What civilization did our European ancestors create? How did they render it so powerful? And why is it so different from its neighbors? This course, with lectures, slides, cinema, and class discussion, addresses these matters topically. You may expect to read and view a number of original sources (biographies, travel accounts, monumental art, and doodles) in order to study the rise and rivalry of Christianity and Islam; changing notions of the hero from swordsman to scientist; comparative treatments of minorities (Jews) and majorities (women); the relationship between church and state; the management of loyalty and love; shipping, printing, and technological superiority; why Columbus reached Japan and Galileo discovered Neptune; the relation between art and autobiography; and other topics that illustrate European history. There will be one hour examination in addition to the final. Cost:2 WL:4 (Lindner)
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161. United States, 1865 to the Present. (3). (SS).

This course is an undergraduate survey of American history from 1865 to the present. It examines the major social, political, and economic events that shaped America after the Civil War (Reconstruction, Industrialization, Progressivism, the New Deal, WWI and II, McCarthyism, Feminism, the Civil Rights Movement, the Turbulent Sixties, Great Society Liberalism, Reagan Republicanism, etc.). This survey acquaints students with the urban, labor, African-American, and women's history of this period through both primary and secondary sources. Cost:3 (Thompson)
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300-Level Courses and Above are for Juniors and Seniors

319. Europe Since 1945. (3). (SS).

The aim of this course is to provide a comprehensive critical introduction to European society, culture, and politics since the Second World War. Lectures and readings will cover both Eastern and Western Europe, the international arena and the national histories of particular countries, and social and cultural life as well as political developments. The course aims to explore the shaping of the contemporary world and to introduce students to societies and political cultures which are both structurally similar and fundamentally different from their own. Instruction will be via lectures and ad hoc discussion, evaluation via midterm exam and end-of-term essay. No special background is required; prejudices and preconceptions about European societies are enough. Cost:3 -4 WL:4 (Eley)
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368/Amer. Cult. 342/WS 360. History of the Family in the U.S. (3). (SS).

This course aims to help students gain a perspective on the contemporary family by studying the development of this important institution in the American past. Particular emphasis will be placed on changing attitudes towards and experiences of sex roles, sexuality, childrearing, work patterns, and relationships between men, women, and children. We will explore: race, ethnicity, and class; cover economic developments as well as shifting conceptions of the role of the state; and ask about the impact of these factors on family life. We will want to examine how much the family has changed over time and try to project, on the basis of historical evidence, whither the family is going. Cost:3 (Morantz-Sanchez)
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394. Reading Course. Open only to history concentrators by written permission of instructor. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit only with permission of the Associate Chairman.

This is an independent 1-3 credit course open only to history concentrators by written permission of the instructor. It may be repeated for credit only with permission of the Associate Chairman.
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397. History Colloquium. History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.
Section 101 Poverty in Modern America.
This course will examine the changing profile of poverty in modern America and it will analyze the ways in which poverty has been responded to by those with power in society and those without. Students will meet twice weekly to critically discuss the assigned readings. Students are also expected to consider how different readings may be connected. There will be a series of student presentations on the readings as well as a five and a ten page paper assignment. (Thompson)
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Section 102 Travel in History, Literature, and Art. In this seminar we shall read, look at, and discuss some of the vast resources on travel, that is, the evidence of our ancestors and ourselves experiencing and reconstructing distant lands and their populations. The work for class will consist of reading original sources, beginning in the 1250s and continuing down to the present. These sources include travel narratives, artistic depictions recalling sights the artist experienced, and a few films. Some materials will come from the history of discovery and exploration, others from tourism, others from mountaineering, and as an interesting control, one or two travel accounts from the genre of science fiction. This seminar requires a good deal of reading and is not for those who seek entertainment alone. (Lindner)
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Section 103 U-M Contributions to Communty Building. Harvard, Yale, and Princeton take great pride in what their alumni, faculty, students and staff have contributed to the making of the American nation. The University of Michigan, in contrast, tends not to salute such efforts by those associated with it. This course, after some readings on the evolution of volunteerism and into the history of U-M, thus invites students to do primary research into efforts at community-building. (Achenbaum)
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Summer Half-Term, 1998 (June 29-August 18, 1998)

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300-Level Courses and Above are for Juniors and Seniors

393. Topics in U.S. and Latin American History. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.
Section 201 U.S. Labor History: The Case of Michigan Auto Workers, 1900-Present.
The history of Michigan auto workers will illustrate the history of American workers through the twentieth century. Topics covered will include the shift from craft to mass production, work and technology, AFL and CIO efforts at unionization, the rise of the UAW, the transformation of the social composition of the workforce, and the crises of deindustrialization and downsizing since the early 1970s. (Meyer)

Section 202 The Civil War Era, 1845-1877. This course will explore the causes, conduct, and consequences of the American Civil War. The social and economic causes of the so-called "Political Crisis of the 1850s" will be analyzed as a means of explaining the southern states' secession as well as Lincoln's determination to save the Union. The strategic, operational, and tactical conduct of the war will be major points of emphasis, as will the war's impact on politics, the economy, and society, both North and South. Finally, the course will explore the period of Reconstruction and consider its revolutionary impact on the nation. (Fitzpatrick)
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A course number in the 500s does not indicate a more difficult or advanced course than one in the 400s.

593. Topics in U.S. History. Upper-class standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.
Section 201 U.S. Labor History: The Case of Michigan Auto Workers, 1900-Present.
For Summer Half-Term, 1998, this section is offered jointly with History 393.201. (Meyer)

Section 202 The Civil War Era, 1845-1877. For Summer Half-Term, 1998, this section is offered jointly with History 393.202. (Fitzpatrick)
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Spring/Summer Term, 1998 (May 5-August 18, 1998)

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300-Level Courses and Above are for Juniors and Seniors

395. Reading Course. Open only to history concentrators by written permission of instructor. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit only with permission of the Associate Chairman.
This is an independent 1-4 credit course open only to history concentrators by written permission of the instructor.
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399. Honors Colloquium, Senior. Honors student, Hist. 398, and senior standing. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (1-6). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.
This course is a workshop for thesis writers. It concentrates on practical and theoretical problems of research and writing with special reference to methodological questions.
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