Spring/Summer Course Guide

Courses in Political Science (Division 450)

Spring

Summer

Spring/Summer

Spring Half-Term, 1998 (May 5-June 23, 1998)

Take me to the Spring Time Schedule

Primarily for First and Second Year Students

101. Introduction to Political Theory. (4). (SS).

An overview of some classic texts of political thought, including Homer, Plato, Machiavelli, Locke, Rousseau, Burke, Mill, Marx, and Rawls. We will explore and evaluate these theorists' answers to questions such as: What's the point of politics? What makes state power legitimate? What is the proper relation between the individual and the state? What's Appealing and what's lamentable about democracy? The course will include both lectures and discussions each week. Cost:2 WL:1 (Mazie)
Check Times, Location, and Availability

160. Introduction to World Politics. (4). (SS).

This course will introduce students to the fundamental issues of international relations. It will familiarize the students with the main theories that help us to understand the behavior of states in the international arena. We will discuss and criticize the major theories, or explanations, of conflict and cooperation and will simultaneously apply these theories in a critical and logical manner to the major topics of international politics. Some of the more specific topics that we will be analyzing are the end of the Cold War and the new international environment, nuclear deterrence, and the role of the United Nations in the international system. Cost:2 WL:1 (Lopez)
Check Times, Location, and Availability

Primarily for Juniors and Seniors

412. The Legal Process. Two courses in political science. (3). (Excl).

Legal Process will examine a host of different issues pertaining to legal theory and legal organizations. Among them, we'll ask: (1) What is the difference between law and politics and why is that distinction worth investigating? Is politics simply an arena where the most powerful person wins whereas law exists to uncover truth? (2) How can one justify the law, in all its myriad manifestations, as autonomous and "logical"? What are the implicit assumptions in these theories that allow them to justify the authority and autonomy of law? By exposing these latent assumptions, can we still view law, in principle, as impartial and infallible? (3) Is law really neutral with regard to the identities of members in society, or does it reflect the individual interests of certain groups? Do the theoretical underpinnings of law affect the marginal members of society the same way as the powerful? (4) Does law differ from morality? If so, what's at stake in such a distinction? That is, what do we gain and lose as a matter of theory by thinking of the two as different? Can judges ever refrain from introducing their own personal morality into their decision-making process? We'll read court cases, articles, and a few books as we embark on our journey to answer these questions. (Kang)
Check Times, Location, and Availability

423. Politics of the Metropolis. Two courses in political science. (3). (Excl).

This course will examine the development and current state of local politics in the United States. The course will focus upon the distribution of power and influence in urban America. Throughout the course we will discuss the historical developments and other realities that shape politics in American cities, including suburbanization, the global economy, intergovernmental relations, and issues of race and class. We will also consider recent attempts to increase citizen participation in local government. Cost:2 WL:1 (Schuckman)
Check Times, Location, and Availability

440. Comparative Politics. Any 100-level course in political science or upperclass standing. (3). (Excl).
Section 101 The Other Europe: Russia, Eastern Europe, and Turkey in the Twentieth Century. Prerequisites: Political Science 101, 140, or 160 desirable, but not necessary.
There are many good reasons to study Russia, Eastern Europe, and Turkey. For one, the study of comparative government has largely ignored these regions in favor of the advanced industrial democracies of Western Europe. Yet the less wealthy and democratic countries of eastern Europe and the Mediterranean arguably have more to teach us that is relevant to the rest of the developing world. Second, over the last decade these countries have been democratizing their authoritarian governments and radically liberalizing their economies. Because these reforms have succeeded in some of these countries but not in others, we can learn what conditions are conducive to democracy and free markets. Third, Turkey is a U.S. ally, a member of the NATO, and a country with a predominantly Muslim population. In coming decades Islam is projected to surpass Christianity as the world's most practiced religion. In addition, these countries are also central to contemporary International politics. Russia possesses the world's second largest nuclear arsenal and occupies the center of the "Eurasian heartland," bordering many countries in Europe, the Middle East, and Asia. Its location makes it extremely important diplomatically and militarily. Second, the region contains several ethnic conflicts, most notably in Yugoslavia where the U.S. has peace-keeping troops deployed. This course will examine the Yugoslav and Bosnian civil wars in some detail. Finally, the Russian Revolution of 1917 was far and away the most important event of the twentieth century. The communist form of government which it created spread to much of the world and still exists today in Vietnam, North Korea, Cuba, and the world's next superpower, China. Hence, understanding twentieth-century history requires knowledge of what the Russian Revolution created. Cost:2 WL:1 (Rivera)
Check Times, Location, and Availability

460. Problems in World Politics. Any 100-level course in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice with permission of the instructor.
Section 101.
Students study both theories of World Politics and how to theorize in general. While we study familiar theories, such as Realism, Marxism, or rational choice, the course emphasizes both the philosophy of science behind theories and hands-on experience working with them. Students write several problems sets and complete in-class worksheets that provide practice in both inductive and deductive reasoning as well as hypothesis testing in several settings. Both what we know and how we got to know it are central to the course. Cost:2 WL:1 (Pahre)
Check Times, Location, and Availability

472. International Security Affairs. Two courses in political science. (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($30) required.

The course focuses on the process by which officials make national security decisions, and it introduces complementary explanations of national security affairs, including rational choice, bounded rationality, and prospect theory. In the forest of East-West politics, the West slew a dying Soviet bear. Thereafter, the United States perceives itself in a jungle teeming with additional beasts - fresh threats to the Washington-dominated post-Cold War world. Viewed through an American prism, they are the rogue elephants of the international system. Students should have taken an introductory course in international politics, such as PS 160. There are a midterm and final paper. Students will be evaluated regarding the quality and quantity of their participation in a computer conference Conferencing on the Web, (COW). The course meets at a computer site in order to access the Internet. Cost:3 WL:1 (Tanter)
See:  http://www.lib.umich.edu/libhome/Documents.center/frames/ps472fr.html
Check Times, Location, and Availability

491. Directed Studies. Two courses in political science and permission of instructor and the Director of Undergraduate Studies. (1-6). (Excl). No more than four credits of directed study credit may be elected as part of a concentration program in Political Science. (INDEPENDENT). Political Science 491 and 492 may be elected for a total of eight credits.

Political Science 491 and 492 may be elected for a total of eight credits. No more than four credits of directed study credit may be elected as part of a concentration program in Political Science. A directed study on any subject agreed upon by a student and an advising instructor that does not duplicate a regular course offering. Students wishing to enroll for a directed study course are urged to work out the details of the course before the start of the term. Cost:1 WL:1
Check Times, Location, and Availability

Summer Half-Term, 1998 (June 29-August 18, 1998)

Take me to the Summer Time Schedule

Primarily for First and Second Year Students

111. Introduction to American Politics. (4). (SS).
This course examines a wide range of topics related to politics and government in the United States. We will begin by examining the theoretical framework of American government, with an emphasis on the U.S. Constitution and the Federalist Papers. From there, we will examine the role individual citizens and government officials play in the American system, paying close attention to how various institutions shape political activities and public policies. While this course will primarily focus on the national government, recent developments and debates over federalism and the role of state and local governments will also be addressed. Cost:2 WL:1 (Nemec)
Check Times, Location, and Availability

Primarily for Juniors and Seniors

412. The Legal Process. Two courses in political science. (3). (Excl).
Legal Process combines the study of legal theory with selected case studies in American and comparative law. The course examines the nature of legal interpretation, the organization of legal institutions, the role of constitutions in structuring governments and legal systems, and the relation between law and politics. Cost:2 WL:1 (Fuentes-Rohwer)
Check Times, Location, and Availability

440. Comparative Politics. Any 100-level course in political science or upperclass standing. (3). (Excl).
The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with politics in different types of political systems in key developing countries. The theme of PS 440 will be a systematic comparison of the political impact of structural economic reform in key developing areas in Asia: Taiwan, China, and selected ASEAN countries. No prior knowledge of China, Taiwan, or Indonesia is required. Cost:2 WL:1 (Landry)
Check Times, Location, and Availability

442. Governments and Politics in Western Europe. Any 100-level course in political science or upperclass standing. (3). (Excl).
This course examines the institutional structures, processes, and actors involved in making public policy in Western European countries. We will also consider the significant changes that are brought to European politics by the growth in importance of the European Union. The primary concern will be the effectiveness of linkages between citizens and government. The method of instruction is primarily lecture, although considerable class discussion will also take place. Grades will be based on several short papers/presentations and an exam. Cost:2 WL:1 (Bennett)
Check Times, Location, and Availability

492. Directed Studies. Two courses in political science and permission of instructor and the Director of Undergraduate Studies. (1-6). (Excl). No more than four credits of directed study may be elected as part of a concentration program in Political Science. (INDEPENDENT). Political Science 491 and 492 may be elected for a total of eight credits.
Political Science 491 and 492 may be elected for a total of eight credits. No more than four credits of directed study credit may be elected as part of a concentration program in Political Science. A directed study on any subject agreed upon by a student and an advising instructor that does not duplicate a regular course offering. Students wishing to enroll for a directed study course are urged to work out the details of the course before the start of the term. Cost:1 WL:1
Check Times, Location, and Availability

592. Advanced Internship in Political Science. Two courses in political science at the 400 level or above and concentration in political science; or graduate standing. Permission of supervising instructor and review by the Department's internship advisor. (2-6). (Excl). No more than four credits of internship may be included as part of a concentration plan in political science. (EXPERIENTIAL). All internship courses may be elected for a maximum total of eight credits.
This class offers students with summer internships in Washington the opportunity to build on their internship experiences to gain UM course credit. The class will combine students' internship experiences with reading scholarly research on American government and politics. Our goals will be to discover how well the political science literature describes the "real world" of American government, and to discuss what hands-on experience with the world of politics can add to this scholarly work. Requirements: Basic knowledge of American government and permission of the instructor. The class is limited to 15 students and admission will be on a first-come/first-served basis. Cost:2 WL:3 (Sherman)
This course can also be elected as an independent study with any of the department's faculty, and students must contact faculty members directly and work out course requirements before enrolling.
Check Times, Location, and Availability

Spring/Summer Term, 1998 (May 5-August 18, 1998)

Take me to the Spring/Summer Time Schedule

Primarily for Juniors and Seniors

491. Directed Studies. Two courses in political science and permission of instructor and the Director of Undergraduate Studies. (1-6). (Excl). No more than four credits of directed study credit may be elected as part of a concentration program in Political Science. (INDEPENDENT). Political Science 491 and 492 may be elected for a total of eight credits.
A directed study on any subject agreed upon by a student and an advising instructor that does not duplicate a regular course offering. Students wishing to enroll for a directed study course are urged to work out the details of the course before the start of the term.
Check Times, Location, and Availability


lsa logo

University of Michigan | College of LS&A | Student Academic Affairs | LS&A Bulletin Index

This page maintained by LS&A Academic Information and Publications, 1228 Angell Hall

Copyright © 1998 The Regents of the University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA +1 734 764-1817

Trademarks of the University of Michigan may not be electronically or otherwise altered or separated from this document or used for any non-University purpose.