Spring/Summer Course Guide

Slavic Languages and Literatures

Courses in Russian (Division 466)

Spring

Summer

Spring/Summer

Spring Half-Term, 1998 (May 5-June 23, 1998)

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Language

102. First-Year Russian, Continued. Russian 101. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 103, 111, or 112. (4). (LR).

In this course, the sequel to Russian 101, students complete their introduction to Russian grammar, expand their vocabulary and learn to express themselves in Russian about topics of interest, including Russian culture. Prior to the course, students would have covered the following topics: the alphabet (printed and cursive), vowel reduction, intonation patterns, noun gender and adjectival agreement, and hard/soft noun endings. Familiarity with the following case endings for nouns, adjectives, and pronouns is assumed: nominative (singular and plural), accusative (singular and inanimate plural), prepositional (singular), and genitive case. For verbs, students would know past, present, and future tenses of imperfective and perfective aspect. In addition, students should have covered such conversational topics as introductions, expressions for greetings and farewells and getting acquainted. The course meets ten hours/week and requires at least two hours/week listening to cassettes and approx. 25 hours/week for homework. Text: Russian Stage One, 2nd ed., Bitekhina, Davidson, Dorofeyeva, Fedyanina. Cost:3 WL:4
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Literature

355. Supervised Reading of Russian Literature. Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for credit twice.

See Russian 355 (Summer Term).
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491. Senior Honors Course. Approval of departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). Credit is granted for a combined total of six credits of Russian 491 and 492.

The first half of the two-term Honors course. Honors students, working in consultation with the Honors advisor and a thesis supervisor, conduct research on an area of literary or linguistic studies. By the end of 491 the students should have a detailed bibliography and a prospectus for a thesis. Regular meetings with the supervisor and participation in an informal seminar are expected. Studies continue with 492.
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Summer Half-Term, 1998 (June 29-August 18, 1998)

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Language

103/RC Core 193. Intensive First-Year Russian. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 101, 102, 111, or 112. (8). (LR).
An intensive course, covering the material usually covered in regular year-long first-year courses. Using as the primary text Russian Stage One, this course will take the beginner to a level of basic fluency in all four language skills (speaking, listening, reading, writing). Speaking skills are given special emphasis. Student will also be introduced to all of the basics of Russian grammar (declension, conjugation, and other fundamental structural patterns). Assessment is based on in-class performance, quality of written assignments, tests and examinations, and a final oral proficiency interview. The work load is heavy, but the committed student who begins this course with no knowledge of the language whatever will make rapid and very satisfying progress.
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203/RC Core 293. Intensive Second Year Russian. Russian 102 or 103. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Russian 201 or 202. (8). (LR).
An intensive course, using Russian Stage Two as the primary text. The course aims to expand dramatically students' command of practical Russian vocabulary and the committed student should, by the end of Russian 203, be able to function relatively comfortably in essential real-life Russian language situations. Authentic language materials are used extensively, and students who have successfully completed this course are ready to consider study in Russia. Assessment is based on in-class performance, quality of written assignments, tests and examinations, and a final oral proficiency interview. The work load is heavy, and timely completion of the daily assignments is essential for success, but students who have a solid grounding in the basics of Russian grammar and who are ready for the demands of an intensive course will find this course very rewarding.
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303. Third-Year Intensive Russian. Russian 203. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 301 or 302. (8). (Excl).
This proficiency-oriented course reviews and deepens knowledge of Russian grammar and syntax, introduces word-building and idioms, and substantially expands vocabulary through the use of original twentieth-century prose readings, contemporary films, electronic and print media, rock music, and other authentic popular and everyday materials. Great emphasis is placed upon active student participation in class and on the even development of all four language skills: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Many class activities and homework assignments are modeled on the linguistic requirements and real-life situations of the New Russia. Russian is the only language used in class. Commitment to participation inside the class room and to hard work on assignments at home and in the language laboratory is essential. Students are evaluated on the basis of in-class performance, written assignments, tests and examinations, and an oral proficiency interview conducted at the end of the course. Students who complete Russian 303 should be able to participate readily in conversations with native speakers of Russian, to write relatively complex Russian, and to read most kinds of Russian texts quite fluently with the aid of a dictionary.
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Literature

355. Supervised Reading of Russian Literature. Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for credit twice.
Students develop a term-long reading and writing project on a topic or topics in Russian literary or linguistic studies, in consultation with a member of the faculty. Readings may include substantial amounts of Russian. Weekly meetings with the supervisor may be conducted in English or Russian. Writing assignments made according to the number of credit hours elected, but must correspond to the writing expectations of upper-level department courses.
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492. Senior Honors Course. Approval of departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). Credit is granted for a combined total of six credits of Russian 491 and 492.
During 492 (the second half of the year-long Honors course) the student produces a draft of a thesis of fifty to one hundred pages on a topic in literary or linguistic studies, and then, in consultation with a thesis supervisor and the Honors advisor, the final version of the thesis. Regular meetings with supervisor, participation in informal seminars, and successful submission of thesis lead to the award of an Honors degree in Russian. An oral defense may be required. Cost:3 WL:3
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Spring/Summer Term, 1998 (May 5-August 18, 1998)

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