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Spring/Summer '99 Course Guide

Courses in American Culture (Division 315)


Calendars

Spring Half-Term, 1999 (May 3 June 22, 1999)
Spring/Summer Term, 1999 (May 3 August 17, 1999)
Summer Half-Term, 1999 (June 28 August 17, 1999)


Skip to a Specific Term's Descriptions:

Spring Half-Term

Spring/Summer Term

Summer Half-Term


Spring Half-Term Courses

Take me to the Spring Half-Term '99 Time Schedule for American Culture.


Unless otherwise stated, the permission required for the repetition for credit of specifically designated courses is that of the student's concentration or BGS advisor.


Amer. Cult. 201. American Values.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Reshela DuPuis (resh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to explore a set of linked but distinct core "American Values," those ideas that have acted as foundational notions and that continue to be reflected in emergent ideas of what "America" and "Americans" are about. It does this by examining the various ways Americans of different races, ethnicities, classes, genders, and religions, living in different time periods and regions, and under specific historical conditions, have formulated, understood, championed, transformed, and contested these values. Drawing on interdisciplinary sources and methods and framed by multi-cultural and feminist theoretical approaches, the course will offer students the opportunities to explore their own relationships to these historically-core American values and will encourage them to articulate their own understandings of them through a variety of in-class and take-home group and individual assignments. As a 200-level survey, it is intended to offer students a broad-based understanding of the place of these core values in American society and to help them understand historical relationships between them, rather than focusing in depth on any one set of values, only one time period, or only one approach. The materials for the course encompass a wide range of primary and secondary sources from every period in American history and from across a number of textual, visual, and audio genres. Course requirements will include attendance at and participation in lectures and discussion sections, one group project, one 5-7 page analytical paper, a mixed-format in class midterm exam, and a take-home-essay final exam. As well, there will be multiple short in-class individual response and group collective writing assignments, and occasional quizzes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 206. Themes in American Culture.

Section 101 Laboring to Be American: Work, Race, & Gender in American National Culture

Instructor(s): Holly Mc Guire (leuk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Why, when most people live in cities, is the small farmer still such a powerful ideal of American life? Why are prostitutes seen as criminals instead of entrepreneurs? Why do teenagers in fast-food jobs complain of being "slave labor"? What goes into a "good job," and how do we know? Even before we get jobs, we are being prepared for them, asked to think about them, and shown examples along the way. A lot of what we think about work, however, is old news a couple hundred years old. This course will look at the ways that Americans have thought about work over the past 150 years, and the ways that a person's work shapes how others think about him or her. Central issues will include: the conflicting legacies of a nation built on the ideal of freedom and the reality of slavery; women's struggle for recognition of their paid and unpaid labor; organized labor's attempts to maintain control and dignity in the workplace; the development of professional culture and the rise of the middle class; and the growth mass consumerism, with new incentives for material fulfillment in goods and entertainment. All of these issues shape the ways we will understand and work to "make a living" in the new millennium.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 206. Themes in American Culture.

Section 102 "Are Cities Obsolete?": Detroit and the Politics of History and Culture

Instructor(s): Karen Miller (enzyme@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Detroit is notorious for its image as an urban disaster. Words like "tragedy" and "decline" have come to characterize the city in the national imagination while near-by towns and suburbs have worked to distance themselves from their neighbor. How does a city assume such a powerful national persona and what are the consequences of this kind of characterization? Clearly, Detroit is a far more complicated place than this image of urban decay would have us believe. Residents consistently contest the meanings of the city, some by simply living their multi-faceted lives inside of its borders and others through public art, music, community organizations, and blatant acts of defiance. Detroit is home to over a million people and to a unique political culture.

In this course, we will examine this political culture, paying careful attention to its historical roots. We will read sociological, historical, anthropological, fictional, and poetic accounts of the city, and will watch movies and documentaries about Detroit. This class will provide students with an interdisciplinary study of Detroit and of urban space more generally.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 212. Introduction to Latino Studies Social Science.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Adrian Burgos (aburgos@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

During 1998, the nation was mesmerized by the home-run record chase in Major League baseball. At the center of the media blitz were two men, Mark McGwire cast by the media as the all-American hero and Sammy Sosa, a Dominican-born player with dual citizenship. Their abilities and their relationship with each other promised a nostalgic return to the national pastime. The home-run chase in conjunction with the success of Cuban defectee Orlando "El Duque" Hernandez even revived the idea of "baseball diplomacy" in the Spanish-speaking Caribbean, a popular notion of pan-American relations at the turn-of-the twentieth century. Ironically, this year where Latino players enjoyed their greatest collective success winning the Most Valuable Player award in both leagues coincided with the centennial of the Spanish-American War: a war which for many U.S. scholars was the defining moment of the nation's rise as a world power. Baseball's dramatic season reflects popular culture aided by modern technology can make the local global, and vice versa. By reflecting on relations between the U.S. and the Spanish-speaking Americas during the "American Century," the course readings on labor, colonialism, cultural citizenship, popular culture (music and baseball), and social movements offer insights into the sometimes ambivalent position of Latinos in the U.S. as citizens, laborers, and cultural practioners. Assigned readings such as George Lipsitz Dangerous Crossroads, Michel-Rolph Trouillot Silencing the Past, and Louis Perez The War of 1898 and other course materials challenge students to rethink what constitutes the nation, citizenship, and colonialism. Through these reading students are introduced to issues, methods, and the practice of Latino Studies. In addition, the place of Latinos within the practice and production of American Studies scholarship is addressed, particular attention given to how Latino Studies scholars must learn to deal with silences within historiography, oral sources, or the archive.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 301. Topics in American Culture.

Section 101 U.S. Low Budget & Independent Cinema, from Eraserhead to Sling Blade. (3 credits)

Instructor(s): Elizabeth Brent (esb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (1-3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

David Lynch...The Coen Brothers...Spike Lee...Jim Jarmusche...Wayne Wang...Julie Dash...Richard Rodriguez... The years 1980 present represent a new era in narrative cinema, a new generation of filmmakers, and an economic and industry context in which independent cinema has flourished. This generation of filmmakers created stylistically innovative and ideologically complex movies on virtually no budget, often on personal credit cards. The proliferation of independent film festivals nationally and internationally, and the availability of video rental opened up new opportunities for these young, innovative filmmakers. This course focuses on cinematic and ideological analysis of these low-budget films and of the broader cultural, economic, and historical context through which they were produced, such as: the marketing of multi-culturalism; the economics of film production and distribution; the proliferation of film festivals; the influence of MTV; new video technology; conservative efforts at censorship and broader national events and issues. Lectures/discussions will focus on stylistic elements within the film texts, as well as the broader cultural context of the means of production how it was that these films got made in the first place. We will also examine the ways in which these films draw from, alter and add to ideological conventions of Hollywood cinema around issues of: masculinity; national identity; family values; violence and the media; Judeo-Christian iconography; community; psycho-sexual drama; capitalism; the immigrant experience; Utopianism; and the burden of history. Film screenings will include: Eraserhead (David Lynch, 1978); Stranger than Paradise (Jim Jarmusche, 1985); She's Gotta Have It (Spike Lee, 1986); El Mariache (Robert Rodriguez, 1993); Sling Blade (Billy Bob Thornton, 1996); Watermelon Woman (1997).

Each student will be required to do a research project on a selected film for (30%) of their grade. This project will involve creating a bibiliography of critical writing on the selected film and writer/director, as well as gathering and writing up the following types of information: brief bio of writer/director; other films by the same auteur; how the film was financed, the budget, conditions of production; general review of critical responses. Students will also be expected to make copies of five critical articles on the selected film, which will be distributed at reading material for the other students. Each student will also be required to give a presentation on their research findings. Students will be required to write three 3-4 pages analytical essays on a selected films (3x15%=45%). Finally, students will be give five mini-quizzes over the course of the term, based on close textual analysis, using "film language" of selected scenes from the films (5x5%=25%). (The required lab fee for this course will range between $10 and $40)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 301. Topics in American Culture.

Section 102 Migrant Workers. (2 credits). Meets with American Culture 601 and RC Core 205.025, RC Core 305.025, and RC Core 405.025

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Amer. Cult. 309. Learning through Community Practice.

Section 101 Practicum in the Multicultural Community. (3 credits). Meets with Psych. 305.101

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Psychology 305.101.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Amer. Cult. 340/CAAS 340. A History of Blacks in American Film.

Section 101 The African American Cinematic Experience

Instructor(s): Melba Boyd

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($15) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($15) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Afroamerican and African Studies 340.101.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Amer. Cult. 342/Hist. 368/WS 360. History of the Family in the U.S.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Regina Morantz-Sanchez (reginann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See History 368.101.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 383. Junior Honors Reading and Thesis.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and grade point average of at least 3.0. (2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Reading of selected works on American Culture. Conferences, written reports, and term papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 388. Field Study.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (1-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Field experience in organizations, institutions, and service agencies under such University of Michigan programs as the Washington and New York Internship Program and Project Community. Students must make individual arrangements with these programs.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 389. Reading Course in American Culture.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An independent study course available to undergraduates who are interested in designing a reading list for the purpose of exploring new areas in the field of American studies. Each student makes individual arrangements with a faculty member in the student's area of interest.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 493. Honors Readings and Thesis.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing and a grade point average of at least 3.5 in Honors concentration. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Independent interdisciplinary study supervised by two or more tutors leading to an original paper. This is a two-term course with 3 hours of credit each term; a grade is not posted until the end of the second term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spring/Summer Term Courses

Take me to the Spring/Summer Term '99 Time Schedule for American Culture.


Amer. Cult. 323. Intermediate Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mc Cue

Prerequisites & Distribution: Amer. Cult. 322 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (LR).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Continuation of American Culture 322.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 383. Junior Honors Reading and Thesis.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and grade point average of at least 3.0. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Reading of selected works on American Culture. Conferences, written reports, and term papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 388. Field Study.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (1-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Field experience in organizations, institutions, and service agencies under such University of Michigan programs as the Washington and New York Internship Program and Project Community. Students must make individual arrangements with these programs.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 389. Reading Course in American Culture.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An independent study course available to undergraduates who are interested in designing a reading list for the purpose of exploring new areas in the field of American studies. Each student makes individual arrangements with a faculty member in the student's area of interest.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 489. Senior Essay.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrators and Amer. Cult. 350. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed for concentrators who desire a more directed research experience with individual faculty at the end of their undergraduate career. It allows a senior concentrator in American Culture the opportunity to write a research paper under the direction of a particular faculty member.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 493. Honors Readings and Thesis.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing and a grade point average of at least 3.5 in Honors concentration. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Independent interdisciplinary study supervised by two or more tutors leading to an original paper. A grade is not posted until the end of the second term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Summer Half-Term Courses

Take me to the Summer Half-Term '99 Time Schedule for American Culture.

Unless otherwise stated, the permission required for the repetition for credit of specifically designated courses is that of the student's concentration or BGS advisor.


Amer. Cult. 210. Introduction to Ethnic Studies.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Larry Hashima (lhashima@umich.edu), Nicole Stanton (stantonn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). May be repeated with permission for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Using literature and film as its primary texts, this course will examine the various forms of resistance undertaken by racial and ethnic minority populations (Native Americans, African Americans, Asian Americans and Latinos) in the United States. Students will be asked to rethink resistance its definitions, motivations, and goals by engaging with a wide spectrum of texts from various historical moments, ranging from the mid-19th century to the present. Questions this course will consider include: How do we define "resistance"? What constitutes "effective resistance"? What are some forms of resistance (writing, political demonstration, cultural nationalism, armed revolution, etc.)? What is the historical context for each of these resistant efforts? What are the relationships between individual and community forms of resistance, or "political" and "cultural" forms of resistance? What motivates communities and/or individuals towards resistance? What are communities and/or individuals resisting? Are "everyday" forms of resistance less effective than the resistance expressed through major "events"? Lectures and secondary readings will place primary texts in a proper historical context, allowing students to better understand the differing motivations and results of these attempts at resistance. Writing assignments and examinations will ask students to demonstrate their understanding of the course readings by critically engaging the above questions, and to develop arguments that consider the effectiveness and the results of resistance. By the end of the course, students should possess a working definition of resistance, and be able to use historical examples of resistance to better understand contemporary attempts at resistance.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 240/WS 240. Introduction to Women's Studies.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Anne Herrmann (anneh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Women's Studies 240.201.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 301. Topics in American Culture.

Section 201 National Narratives in Hollywood Cinema. (3 credits)

Instructor(s): Elizabeth Brent (esb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (1-3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course focuses on national narratives in Hollywood cinema, spanning six decades of the U.S. cinematic tradition. We will look at recurring motifs in a selection of films, all of which address issues, more or less directly, of national myth and self-definition. Lecture/discussion will focus on detailed analysis of film texts. Requirements: three 4-5 page essays and weekly "in-class writing" assignments. Films include: Stagecoach (1939); Modern Times (1936); It's a Wonderful Life (1946); Easy Rider (1969); Smoke (1995); and Smoke Signals (1998). (Lab fee will range from $10 to $40).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 301. Topics in American Culture.

Section 202 Migrant Workers. (2 credits). Meets with American Culture 601 and RC Core 205.025, RC Core 305.025, and RC Core 405.025

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Amer. Cult. 304/Soc. 304. American Immigration.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Dickerson

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Sociology 304.201.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 309. Learning through Community Practice.

Section 201 Practicum in the Multicultural Community. (3 credits). Meets with Psych 305.101

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Psychology 305.201.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 383. Junior Honors Reading and Thesis.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and grade point average of at least 3.0. (2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Reading of selected works on American Culture. Conferences, written reports, and term papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 388. Field Study.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (1-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Field experience in organizations, institutions, and service agencies under such University of Michigan programs as the Washington and New York Internship Program and Project Community. Students must make individual arrangements with these programs.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 389. Reading Course in American Culture.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An independent study course available to undergraduates who are interested in designing a reading list for the purpose of exploring new areas in the field of American studies. Each student makes individual arrangements with a faculty member in the student's area of interest.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 493. Honors Readings and Thesis.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing and a grade point average of at least 3.5 in Honors concentration. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Independent interdisciplinary study supervised by two or more tutors leading to an original paper. This is a two-term course with 3 hours of credit each term; a grade is not posted until the end of the second term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

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