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Spring/Summer '99 Course Guide

Courses in Cultural Anthropology (Division 319)


Calendars

Spring Half-Term, 1999 (May 3 June 22, 1999)
Spring/Summer Term, 1999 (May 3 August 17, 1999)
Summer Half-Term, 1999 (June 28 August 17, 1999)


Skip to a Specific Term's Descriptions:

Spring Half-Term

Spring/Summer Term

Summer Half-Term


Spring Half-Term Courses

Take me to the Spring Half-Term '99 Time Schedule for Cultural Anthropology.


Anthro. 101. Introduction to Anthropology.

Introductory Courses

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Rachel Caspari (rcaspari@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for first- and second-year students. (4). (SS). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This introductory course exposes and explores the structures of inquiry characteristic of anthropology and surveys the field's four subdisciplines (biological, archaeological, cultural, and linguistic anthropology), providing a first glimpse of the field's overall context, history, present status, and importance. The principal aim of the course is to help students develop a coherent view of the essential concepts, structures, and intellectual methods that typify the discipline. It stresses unifying principles that link the subdisciplines and thereby create anthropology's comprehensive, holistic world view. It teaches students various ways of learning and thinking about the world's many designs for living in time and space. It prepares them to integrate and interpret information, to evaluate conflicting claims about human nature and diversity, and to think critically. Topics covered include: the nature of culture and ethnicity; human genetics, evolution, and the fossil record; the concept of race; primate (monkey and ape) behavior; language and culture; systems of marriage, kinship and family organization; sex and gender roles; economics, politics, and religion in global perspective; the cultural dimension of economic development and contemporary social change; and globalization. Required readings may include an introductory text and various paperbacks. Lectures and discussion. Two objective exams (multiple choice and true or false questions) cover the two halves of the course. The second exam is given on the last day of class. There is no final exam and no term paper. Section leaders require quizzes and perhaps a short paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1,3,4

Anthro. 296. Topics in Archaeology.

Introductory Courses

Section 101 Archaeology in Film and Television

Instructor(s): Jane Baxter (jejb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Indiana Jones, the dashing and daring adventurer in search of lost treasure, is the most recognizable and most enduring image of an archaeologist in America today. Since the 1940s, movie and television viewers have been entertained by diverse images of archaeologists at work. While films and television are largely responsible for the increase in public awareness of archaeology, the quest to provide lively entertainment has often resulted in misrepresentations and distortions of archaeological research. These characterizations of archaeology as presented to the public provide a fruitful arena to examine the realities and misconceptions that surround the practice of modern archaeology in America today. In this course the viewing of popular films and television episodes that feature archaeologists will be paired with topical readings from professional archaeological literature.

Students will be required both in class discussions and a variety of writing assignments to explore such issues as archaeology and nationalism; relations between archaeologists and indigenous peoples; archaeology and public education; gender, race, and the practice of archaeology; and archaeological ethics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Anthro. 298. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Introductory Courses

Section 101 Anthropology of American Cities

Instructor(s): Jennifer Tilton (jtilton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What forces have shaped U.S. cities such as Detroit, New York, L.A., and Washington DC over the last 50 years? Through an analysis of historical documents, ethnographies, sociological works and films, this course will provide students with an introduction to urban ethnography and urban studies more broadly. Students will develop ways to think about cultural conflicts in cities, the effects of money and migrations on urban spaces, and the influences of crime, fear, and inequality on urban life.

Course readings include historical readings about racial conflict in Detroit, analyses of the militarization and privatization of urban space in L.A., ethnographies of Korean immigrants in L.A., crack dealers in New York, and a gentrifying neighborhood in Washington, DC. Through all of these readings, we will develop an analysis of how wealth and poverty are connected both within cities and between cities and suburbs. We will pay special attention to how race and class hierarchies shape urban space and experiences. Requirements include regular class participation, weekly commentaries, a midterm and a final paper (8-10 pages).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

Anthro. 298. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Introductory Courses

Section 102 Sexuality and Reproduction

Instructor(s): Krista VanVleet (kevv@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course focuses on sexual reproduction and events throughout the human life cycle related to sexuality, fertility, birth, and childcare. Rather than focusing on the physiological processes, we will explore reproduction from the perspectives of cultural anthropology and feminist theory. From these perspectives the biological basis of reproduction is questioned: How are the processes of pregnancy and birth "naturalized"? How do different cultures understand motherhood, parenting, kinship, sexuality, and family? Now more than ever reproduction might be understood as shaped by a global economy. Western medical conceptions of birth are exported to "developing" nations; children in US cities are frequently raised by domestic servants from other areas of the world; parents worldwide may choose the sex of their child. Thus, we will also examine the ways in which sexual reproduction is embedded in local, national, and global practices and politics. Power is structured through the intersecting relationships of gender, sexuality, ethnicity, race, and class and has material as well as ideological effects upon reproduction.

The first part of the course provides a theoretical background to the study of kinship, gender, and sexuality in anthropology. We will ask: What is the relationship between biology and culture? How are sex, gender, and heterosexuality "naturalized"? and What is the relationship between production and reproduction? In the second section we will take a close look at the control of sexuality and regulation of sexual reproduction at the state level. Defining the "normal family" is a significant aspect of national and transnational politics of reproduction. In the third part of the course we will turn our attention to the new reproductive technologies, asking who has access to these technologies and how they may be reshaping or reinforcing notions of sex, gender, sexuality, and family in the U.S. and elsewhere. Finally, we will reconsider kinship and parenting through an examination of different networks of nurturing children that include adoptive and foster relationships, lesbian and gay parenting, domestic workers, and surrogate mothers.

This course will be based upon class discussions, lectures, films, reading and writing assignments, and student presentations. Grades will be based upon class participation, commentaries on the reading which are due each week, class presentations, and a final research paper (8-10 pages). Class attendance is mandatory. Active participation in the class involves keeping up to date on the readings, engaging in class discussions, and contributing to in-class small group work. Students will be asked to present a current example relating to the global politics of reproduction based upon magazine articles, newspaper clippings, films, web sites, or TV. Students will be encouraged to incorporate the ideas generated by presentations and by readings and discussion into their final papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Anthro. 299. Topics in Linguistic Anthropology.

Introductory Courses

Section 101 Language in Media and Advertising

Instructor(s): J Dickinson (jdcknson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Although we encounter representations of people, events, and products every day through media and advertising, we are often unaware of the important roles that language and language politics play in how we perceive what we see, hear, and read. In this course, we will take a cross-cultural approach in studying a range of language issues from language policy and planning to linguistic stereotypes and problems of linguistic discrimination, and consider how these issues can be incorporated into our study of advertising and media.

This aim of this course is to increase students' awareness of how language functions in our everyday lives to shape our perceptions of complex language issues, and even our beliefs about whether problems of cross-cultural communication can be solved. After an introduction to the study of language in media and advertising, we will move on to studying "topical" language issues. Some of the questions we will consider in this section are: How are people represented as members of groups via their language in media and advertising? How does the language of media and advertising influence the way that we perceive or imagine the people who are presented or described to us in news reports and ads? Is language manipulated in media and advertising to create new ways of looking at people and issues, or are these linguistic stereotypes and ideas drawn directly from the culture in which they operate?

First, we look at gender and language in advertising, considering not only how women are portrayed, but also how men and masculinity are constructed. Then, considering some of the same issues, we will move on to consider debates over race, racial stereotypes, and representations in advertising. In addition, we will look at articles about race issues in music and television. In the fourth week of class, we will look at the use of standard languages and dialects in the media, and consider how these shed light on arguments over the "linguistic division of labor." Once again, we will pay special attention to linguistic stereotypes in television commercials and in movies.

In the second half of the class, we will focus on more specific media genres or language issues. We begin by considering case studies of language planning, and consider issues which governments must decide, such as radio time-sharing in multilingual societies, and questions of minority language newspaper publishing. In the last two weeks of class, we will look more closely at how these different language issues including gender, race, ethnicity, and multiculturalism play out in case studies. First, we will look at problems of translation, including dubbing and subtitling, and discuss the roles which media and advertising have played in the development of cross-cultural communication and the global economy. Finally, we end the class with a closer look at sports-casting and classified ads as diverse areas where language issues can become very important.

Students will prepare presentations and a final paper analyzing an example from one of these genres, and reflecting the cross-cultural theoretical work that we have done over the course of the term. Requirements for this course include three short papers (2-3 pp.) and one longer paper (10 pp.), two of which must be presented to the class, and two exams. Participation in group work, class discussion, and individual presentations will constitute one fourth of your grade.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

Anthro. 398. Honors in Cultural Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

For information about Honors work in cultural anthropology, consult with the Honors concentration advisor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Anthro. 499. Undergraduate Reading and Research in Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). A maximum of three credits of independent reading may be included in a concentration plan in anthropology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Independent reading and research under the direction of a faculty member. Ordinarily available only to students with background in anthropology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spring/Summer Term Courses

Take me to the Spring/Summer Term '99 Time Schedule for Cultural Anthropology.


Anthro. 398. Honors in Cultural Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

For information about Honors work in cultural anthropology, consult with the Honors concentration advisor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Anthro. 499. Undergraduate Reading and Research in Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). A maximum of three credits of independent reading may be included in a concentration plan in anthropology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Independent reading and research under the direction of a faculty member. Ordinarily available only to students with background in anthropology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Summer Half-Term Courses

Take me to the Summer Half-Term '99 Time Schedule for Cultural Anthropology.

Anthro. 296. Topics in Archaeology.

Introductory Courses

Section 201 When Worlds Collide: Culture Contact in the New World

Instructor(s): Patrick Livingood (patrickl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~patrickl/anth296/

The most important event in world history in the last 500 years is the contact that occurred between the people of the Americas and the people of Europe, Asia, and Africa. For 12,000 years, each hemisphere developed its own history, traditions, and cultural practices, largely independent of each other. Since 1492, the combination of epidemic diseases, exploration, trade, colonization, resettlement, and warfare has resulted in dramatic cultural changes, the fallout of which still challenges us today. This course will examine this dramatic point in history by looking at information gathered from archaeological sites and from historical documents. Special attention will be paid to "first contact" situations and with trying to understand the motivations and viewpoints that each culture had of each other and of themselves. This course will use case studies from all over the New World including Michigan, New England, the southeastern U.S., the Caribbean, Central America, and Peru, as well as others. Readings will come from a course pack, and grades will depend on class participation, exams, and a final paper in which students will examine one case study of culture contact in more detail.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

Anthro. 298. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Introductory Courses

Section 201 Men, Women, and Nature

Instructor(s): Bethany Grenald (bethany@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The purpose of this course is to explore the intersections between human beings and the natural environment in which they live, with a specific emphasis on how sex and gender influence human connections with the local ecology. What this means is that through extensive class discussions, readings, films and examinations of specific case studies, we'll explore what the word "nature" means, and how we've come to learn that certain things are "natural," and others "unnatural." What is considered to be "natural" for men, and what is considered to be "natural" for women? How are distinctions made between "nature" and "culture?" We'll learn about sexual divisions of labor throughout the world how did these divisions come to be, and why are they perpetuated? What kinds of functions do they have, if any? As the term progresses, we will build upon this knowledge by examining ecofeminism, ecological development, environmental degradation, and environmental justice.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

Anthro. 298. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Introductory Courses

Section 203 Anthropology of Travel

Instructor(s): Penelope Papailias (penel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines travel and writing about travel as cultural practices. Many people are on the move on this planet, including nomads, exiles, refugees, and workers, but only a privileged few are called travelers or tourists. In the first part of this course, we will unravel the dominant Western myth of travel in which a male traveler returns home to tell his wife of his journeys, considering its exclusivity on the basis of class, gender, race, and ethnicity. Then, we examine important historical shifts in travel (the development of modern sightseeing, organized tourism in the Victorian age, contemporary student backpacking) and ask why travel is a time and place for writing (letters, diaries, ethnography). Finally, we look at stories of exile, diaspora and migrant labor, in which home is a problem, not a given, and reconsider the integrity of the categories of "home" and "away." Readings will include selections from ethnographies and novels, as well as letters and essays.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

Anthro. 398. Honors in Cultural Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

For information about Honors work in cultural anthropology, consult with the Honors concentration advisor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Anthro. 499. Undergraduate Reading and Research in Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). A maximum of three credits of independent reading may be included in a concentration plan in anthropology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Independent reading and research under the direction of a faculty member. Ordinarily available only to students with background in anthropology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

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