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Spring/Summer '99 Course Guide

Courses in Biology (Division 328)


Calendars

Spring Half-Term, 1999 (May 3 June 22, 1999)
Spring/Summer Term, 1999 (May 3 August 17, 1999)
Summer Half-Term, 1999 (June 28 August 17, 1999)


Skip to a Specific Term's Descriptions:

Spring Half-Term

Spring/Summer Term

Summer Half-Term


Spring Half-Term Courses

Take me to the Spring Half-Term '99 Time Schedule for Biology.


Biol. 162. Introductory Biology.

Section 101 Students Must Reserve Monday Evenings for Exams. Exams Will Be Given On May 17 and June 7. There Will also Be A Final Exam. Biology 162 is Not Open to Students Who Have Completed Biology 152, 154, Or 195

Instructor(s): Marc Ammerlaan (mcammer@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior or concurrent enrollment in Chemistry 130. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Biology 152 or 195. Credit is granted for a combined total of 12 credits elected in introductory biology. (5). (NS). (BS). Laboratory fee ($68) required.

Credits: (5).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($68) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.biology.lsa.umich.edu/courses/bio162/bio162.html

A one-term introductory course intended for concentrators in biology, other science programs, or preprofessional studies. Other suitably prepared students wishing detailed coverage of biology are also welcome. The aims of Biology 162 are: (1) to provide factual and conceptual knowledge; (2) to give an integrated overview of the central tenets of modern biology; (3) to afford experience in obtaining and interpreting biological hypotheses; and (4) to develop thinking and writing skills. Topics in Biology 162 are divided among four areas: (a) cellular and molecular biology; (b) genetics; (c) evolution; and (d) ecology. Students MUST: (1) attend 3 two-hour lectures, 2 one-and-a-half hour discussion, and 2 three hour lab sections each week; (2) ATTEND THEIR ASSIGNED DISCUSSION AND LAB MEETINGS EACH WEEK STARTING WITH WEDNESDAY DISCUSSIONS IN THE FIRST WEEK OR THEIR SPACE MAY BE GIVEN TO SOMEONE ON THE WAITING LIST; and (3) RESERVE the times and dates for the midterm and final exams (as specified in the Time Schedule) before enrolling. Students usually purchase a textbook, lab manual, and course pack consisting of a syllabus and lecture notes. No other study guides or supplementary materials need be bought. For further information contact the Introductory Biology office, 1039 Chemistry Building (764-1430).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5 Go to 1039 CHEM

Biol. 215. Spring Flora of Michigan.

Biological Evolution and Diversity

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Robyn Burnham (rburnham@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 162 (or 152), 195, or 102. (3). (NS). (BS). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement. Laboratory fee ($65) required.

Credits: (3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($65) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this field-oriented course students will learn to sight-identify selected families, genera, and species of flowering plants common in Michigan during the spring. Conifers, ferns, and primitive vascular plants may also be covered. Students will learn to use keys for identification, a skill that will be useful anywhere the student goes in the future. Students will be expected to know the diagnostic characteristics of the plants learned, interpret structures of the vegetative body, flowers, fruits, and seeds, and learn some of the characteristics of exposure, soil moisture, and topography that help predict the occurrence of plant species in our area. Classes on Tuesdays and Thursdays will consist of a lecture followed by a lab; on Wednesdays the whole afternoon will be devoted to a field trip to a local natural area. Grades will be based on several exams plus frequent quizzes in the lab and the field.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

Biol. 305. Genetics.

Section 101 Students Must Reserve Two Thursday Evenings, May 20 and June 3, 5:00-8:00 P.M. for Exams.

Instructor(s): Santhadevi Jeyabalan (sjeyabal@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 162 (or 152) or 195. Prior or concurrent enrollment in Biol. 310, 311, or Biol. Chem. 415, or Chem. 451. (4). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Open to students concentrating in the natural sciences or intending to apply for graduate or professional study in basic or applied biology. This introduction to genetics includes the following sections: gene transmission in eukaryotes and prokaryotes, linkage and recombination, gene expression, mutation and recombination, DNA and chromosomes, recombinant DNA, gene regulation, developmental genetics, and population genetics. There are six hours of lecture each week and two discussion sections of one and a half hours each, directed by Graduate Student Instructors. The discussion sections introduce relevant new material, expand on and review lecture material, and discuss problem assignments. Grading is based on three exams covering lectures, discussions, reading assignments; exams include problems that test applications of basic concepts and genetic techniques. A practice problem set is available and is covered in discussion sections. Two demonstrations of living material and genetic tools are given during the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Biol. 310. Introductory Biochemistry.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Kathleen Nolta (nolta@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 162 (or 152) or 195; and organic chemistry. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Biol. 311, Biol. Chem. 415, or Chem 451. (4). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~nolta/Bio310.html

Introductory Biochemistry is designed to be a general introduction to the chemistry of biological systems. This course will furnish basic information concerning the organization of chemical reactions in cells and will include information on the enzymes that catalyze these reactions as well as on the interactions between different pathways. Topics covered include: amino acid structure and nomenclature; protein structure and function; enzyme kinetics; nucleic acids; intermediary metabolism; photosynthesis; and regulation of metabolism. This is a lecture based course with supplementary discussion sections.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Biol. 381. General Ecology.

Ecology and Population Biology

Section 711 (5 credits.) This Course is Offered only at the Biological Station, May 16 June 11. Enrollment only by Permission of T. Crandell in the Biological Station Office, 1111 Nat. Sci.

Instructor(s): David Karowe , Joel Heinen

Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 162 (or 152-154) or 195; and a laboratory course in chemistry. (6 in Ann Arbor; 5 at Biol. Station). (Excl). (BS). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement. Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Credits: (6 in Ann Arbor; 5 at Biol. Station).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The study of the factors influencing the distribution and abundance of organisms in nature. Course topics will focus on individual ecology (abiotic and biotic limiting factors, foraging strategies), and population ecology (population dynamics, life history strategies, evolution, competition, herbivory, predation, and mutualism), but will also address community ecology and ecosystem ecology. Lecture and discussion will be supplemented by field laboratory exercises designed to test ecological questions in a variety of terrestrial and aquatic habitats. Students will conduct group research projects and present their results in a symposium at the end of the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Biol. 455. Ethnobotany.

Section 711 This Course Is Offered only at the Biological Station, May 16 June 11. Enrollment only by Permission of T. Crandell in the Biological Station Office, 1111 Nat. Sci.

Instructor(s): Richard Ford (riford@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two college-level biology courses. (5). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (5 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Ethnobotany is the direct interaction between people and plants. Culturally, people name, classify, and use plants. Behaviorally, they collect, harvest, manipulate, and domesticate plants. Plants impose limitations because of their ecology, reproductive biology, population dynamics, physiology, anatomy, and biochemistry. Ethnobotany considers the human-plant equation as an integrated system. We will draw examples in lecture world-wide but concentrate on Native American cultures for our laboratory research problems and numerous field trips. In particular, we will consider their methods of plant management, critical aspects of indigenous knowledge for conservation and applied problems, and ethical issues of intellectual property rights as we explore the ethnobotony of particular cultures. Native Americans from Northern Michigan will be class guests.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spring/Summer Term Courses

Take me to the Spring/Summer Term '99 Time Schedule for Biology.


Summer Half-Term Courses

Take me to the Summer Half-Term '99 Time Schedule for Biology.


Biol. 330. Biology of Birds.

Biological Evolution and Diversity

Section 711 Taught at the Biological Station. (June 19 to August 14)

Instructor(s): Ted Anderson

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two collegiate courses in biology. (5). (Excl). (BS). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement.

Credits: (5 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An introduction to ornithology with emphasis on field identification of the birds of northern Michigan. Field trips are to a variety of habitats in the region. Labs include classification, morphology, and identification of study, specimens. Lectures cover a variety of topics in the evolution, physiology, behavior, and ecology of birds. Each student participates in a group project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Biol. 381. General Ecology.

Ecology and Population Biology

Section 711 Taught at the Biological Station. (June 19 to August 14). (5 credits.)

Instructor(s): Claudia Jolls, Leege

Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 162 (or 152-154) or 195; and a laboratory course in chemistry. (6 in Ann Arbor; 5 at Biol. Station). (Excl). (BS). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement. Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (6 in Ann Arbor; 5 at Biol. Station).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course studies the factors influencing the distribution and abundance of animals and plants. Topics include individual ecology (abiotic and biotic limiting factors), population ecology (population dynamics, competition, predation, and other species interactions), community ecology (species diversity and succession), ecosystem ecology (nutrient cycling and energy flow), and human impacts on ecosystems. Lecture and discussion will be supplemented by field projects designed to test a variety of ecological questions in a range of terrestrial and aquatic communities. Students will conduct a research project at the end of the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Biol. 390. Evolution.

Biological Evolution and Diversity

Section 711 (5 credits). Taught at the Biological Station. (June 19 to August 14).

Instructor(s): Stephen Pruett-Jones

Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 162 (or 152-154). (4 in Ann Arbor; 5 at Biol. Station). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (4; 5 in the half-term in Ann Arbor; 5 at Biol. Station).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Intended for students who wish to learn about both evolutionary biology and be exposed to the natural history of a region. Lectures will emphasize evolutionary theory as the explanation of observed organic diversity in the northern Michigan region. Field experiments will involve plants and animals, aquatic and terrestrial situations and utilize observational, experimental and statistical techniques. Numerous field trips will be taken to understand the importance of human modifications of the environment, biological diversity and differential survival of organisms.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Biol. 438. Biology of Mollusks.

Biological Evolution and Diversity

Section 711 Taught at the Biological Station. (June 19 to August 14). (5 credits.)

Instructor(s): John Burch (jbburch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 162. (3; 5 at the Biological Station). (Excl). (BS). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement.

Credits: (3; 5 at the Biological Station).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An introduction to the biology of mollusks, with emphasis on those living in fresh water and on land. Subjects covered in the course are natural history, systematics, taxon recognition, origins and evolution, diversity and adaptive radiation, zoogeography, functional morphology, genetics, and medical and economic malacology. Laboratory sessions are designed to augment the lectures and field trips. Field trips demonstrate the diversity of local freshwater and land mollusks and provide an acquaintance with their habitats and ecology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Biol. 442. Biology of Insects.

Biological Evolution and Diversity

Section 711 Taught at the Biological Station. (June 19 to August 14)

Instructor(s): Brian Scholtens

Prerequisites & Distribution: Any college-level biology course. (5). (Excl). (BS). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement. Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Credits: (5).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course introduces students to entomology, emphasizing the diversity of insects, their life histories, ecology and behavior using the identification and natural history of the orders and major families of insects. Fieldwork will include trips to major habitats of the area for study and collection and short class projects on ecological and evolutionary questions. Laboratory work will include examining basic insect structure and preparation of individual collections. Lecture topics will include coverage of insect groups, evolution and phylogeny, ecology, behavior and physiology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Biol. 457. Algae in Freshwater Ecosystems.

Biological Evolution and Diversity

Section 711 Taught at the Biological Station. (June 19 to August 14)

Instructor(s): Rex Lowe

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two laboratory courses in botany. (5). (Excl). (BS). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement.

Credits: (5 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A survey of the algae of northern Michigan with emphasis on taxonomy and ecology. Students become familiar with the algae of streams, bogs, fens, swamps, beach pools, and the Great Lakes. Special attention is given to field investigations of periphyton and phytoplankton community ecology and their application to water quality assessment.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Biol. 482. Limnology.

Ecology and Population Biology

Section 711 Taught at the Biological Station. (June 19 to August 14)

Instructor(s): Nancy Tuchman

Prerequisites & Distribution: Three laboratory courses in botany or zoology. (5). (Excl). (BS). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement.

Credits: (5 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course introduces the fundamentals of aquatic ecology (with an emphsis on lakes) from an ecosystem-level approach. General limnological principles as well as physical, chemical, and biological parameters of lakes will be studied. Biological investigations include an introduction to the ecology and taxonomy of the algae, zooplankton, macroinvertebrates, macrophytes, and fishes. Field studies include a comparative lake survey in which students will gain experience in field sampling, laboratory analysis of samples, statistical analysis, and interpretation of data for several types of lakes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Biol. 486. Biology and Ecology of Fish.

Ecology and Population Biology

Section 711 Taught at the Biological Station. (June 19 to August 14)

Instructor(s): Reich, Wehrly

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two laboratory courses in biology. (5). (Excl). (BS). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement.

Credits: (5 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Field and laboratory studies of fish communities. Field trips will sample a variety of aquatic habitats in the area, with analysis of habitat characteristics and fish community composition. Laboratories and lectures will examine physiological, behavioral, and functional morphological factors that determine possible ("fundamental") habitat range, and modifying organismic interactions such as predation and competition leading to actual ("realized") distributions. Strengths and weaknesses of various research approaches to vanalysis of communities will be evaluated.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Biol. 492. Behavioral Ecology.

Ecology and Population Biology

Section 711 Taught at the Biological Station. (June 19 to August 14).

Instructor(s): Brian Hazlett (bhazlett@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 162 (or 152-154) or 195, and one additional course in zoology. (5 in Ann Arbor; 5 at Biol. Station, which also includes Biology 493). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (4 in Ann Arbor; 5 in the half-term; 5 at Biol. Station, which also includes Biology 493).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Class exercises, field techniques and an individual research project will be used to develop skills in taking behavioral data under field conditions and to test functional hypotheses about behavior from current ecological theory. Topics will include: behavior in an evolutionary context, parental care and mating systems, and predator-prey interactions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Biol. 585. Ecology of Streams and Rivers.

Ecology and Population Biology

Section 711 Taught at the Biological Station. (June 19 to August 14)

Instructor(s): Joseph Holomuzki

Prerequisites & Distribution: A previous or concurrent course in limnology, aquatic ecology, phycology, or aquatic invertebrates is recommended. (5). (Excl). (BS). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement.

Credits: (5 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course takes an integrated approach to the study of population, community, and ecosystem structure and function in flowing water. Both observation and experimentation are used to explore interactions among algae, aquatic plants, invertebrates, and fish and their physical and chemical environments in streams and rivers. Study topics will include the natural history of benthic organisms, hydrodynamics, competition, predation, and ecosystem theories. Field trips are taken to streams for observation and comparison. Research experiences are emphasized.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

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