Information for Prospective Students Information for First-Year Students Information for Transfer Students Information for International Students Learning Communities, Study Abroad, Theme Semester Calendars Quick Reference Forms Listings Table of Contents SAA Search Feature Academic Advising, Concentration Advising, How-tos, and Degree Requirements Academic Standards Board, Academic Discipline, Petitions, and Appeals SAA Advisors and Support Staff


Spring/Summer '99 Course Guide

Courses in Buddhist Studies (Division 332)


Calendars

Spring Half-Term, 1999 (May 3 June 22, 1999)
Spring/Summer Term, 1999 (May 3 August 17, 1999)
Summer Half-Term, 1999 (June 28 August 17, 1999)


Skip to a Specific Term's Descriptions:

Spring Half-Term

Spring/Summer Term

Summer Half-Term


Spring Half-Term Courses

Take me to the Spring Half-Term '99 Time Schedule for Buddhist Studies.


Note: The Department Waitlist policy for all courses is 2 Go to the department office to get on a waitlist, and then attend the first class meeting. Policies and procedures for handling the waitlist will be explained there.


Buddh. St. 250/Asian Studies 250. Undergraduate Seminar in Buddhist Studies.

Section 101 Hidden Treasures: The Tradition of Revelation in Tibetan Buddhism. Meets with Religion 380.101

Instructor(s): Ben Bogin (boginb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No knowledge of an Asian language required. (3). (HU). May be repeated with department permission.

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will explore the unique tradition of the concealment and discovery of sacred texts and objects known in Tebet as terma. Throughout the term we will discuss the role of this tradition within the context of Buddhist doctrine, Tibetan culture, and religious revelation in general. Reading assignments will consist of translations of original Tibetan sources as well as secondary sources written by contemporary scholars. The course will focus on the lives of two major treasure discoverers, Pemalingpa (1450-1521) and Jigmelingpa (1730-1798), in order to provide an intimate view of the historical figures central to the tradition. Themes to be discussed will include: Tibetan Buddhist views of sacred landscapes; the literary traditions of myth, prophecy, and autobiography; and contemporary issues concerning present-day treasure revelations. Requirements will include participation in class discussions, weekly writing assignments, and a final exam. No previous knowledge of Buddhism is necessary.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Spring/Summer Term Courses

Take me to the Spring/Summer Term '99 Time Schedule for Buddhist Studies.


Summer Half-Term Courses

Take me to the Summer Half-Term '99 Time Schedule for Buddhist Studies.


Note: The Department Waitlist policy for all courses is 2 Go to the department office to get on a waitlist, and then attend the first class meeting. Policies and procedures for handling the waitlist will be explained there.


Buddh. St. 250/Asian Studies 250. Undergraduate Seminar in Buddhist Studies.

Section 201 Buddhist Saints: Tales of Holy Men and Women in Asia

Instructor(s): Amanda Goodman (akgoodma@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No knowledge of an Asian language required. (3). (HU). May be repeated with department permission.

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

From the miraculous birth of the Buddha to the supernatural tales of Chinese meditation masters, the stories of extraordinary figures have shaped the religious imagination of Buddhists throughout Asia. Whether performing miracles, casting spells, or enduring harsh austerities, Buddhist saints have been depicted as wonder-workers and spiritual guides in the writings, folk legends, and artwork of India, Tibet, China, Korea, and Japan. In order to better understand the ways in which these charismatic figures have been constructed, we will re-examine the image of these holy men and women in light of certain questions: Why are certain individuals identified as holy? What sets these figures apart from their worldly counterparts? How does gender figure into the construction of these figures? Drawing on key concepts in religious studies, women's studies and literary theory, we will focus on the larger issues underlying the reading and writing of idealized religious figures in Buddhist traditions. All reading materials are in English translation. Requirements: class participation and two essays. There are no prerequisites.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

lsa logo

University of Michigan | College of LS&A | Student Academic Affairs | LS&A Bulletin Index

This page maintained by LS&A Academic Information and Publications, 1228 Angell Hall

Copyright © 1999 The Regents of the University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA +1 734 764-1817

Trademarks of the University of Michigan may not be electronically or otherwise altered or separated from this document or used for any non-University purpose.

This page was created at 11:43 AM on Wed, Aug 11, 1999.